Seen passage 3

Set-1
2. Read the passage and complete the table below. 10

Anne Frank is perhaps the most well-known victim of the Nazi Holocaust of World War II. Anne, born on 12 June 1929, was given a diary at the age of 13, in which she chronicled her life from 1942 to 1944. During this time, Anne spent two years in hiding with her family in Nazi-occupied Amsterdam in a secret annex with four other Jews. Betrayed and discovered in 1944, Anne was sent to the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, where she died of typhus in 1945. Anne’s father, Otto Frank, was the only occupant of the secret annex to survive the war. In 1947, he published Anne’s diary as The Diary of a Young Girl. Anne’s account of her internment, as well as her deep belief in humanity has become one of the world’s most widely read books.

 

What/Who Source What/Who When

Anne Frank (i)… Well-known victim of (ii) …

Nazi– Holocaust

Anne and diary living in a (iv) … 1943–1944

(iii) …

The world reading (v) … about (vi) … 1947

Her (vii) … diary humanity after reading (viii) …

(ix) … has become world’s most (x) … after being published

Or. Read the above text and make a flow chart showing different events in Anne’s life. 10

Born in 1929 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-1

  1. Ans. (i) Germany, (ii) after World War II, (iii) her family, (iv) secret annex, (v) ‘The diary of a Young Girl’, (vi) her interment, (vii) deep belief, (viii) the book, (ix) The Diary of a Young Girl’, (x) widely read books.
    2. Ans. Or. (1) Born in 1929 (2) given a diary in 1942 (3) spent from 1942 to 1944 in hiding (4) wrote diary (5) died in 1945 of typhus (6) the diary being published in 1947

Set-2
2. Read the passage and complete the table below: 10

Alexandra Alex Scott was born in Connecticut in 1996, and was diagnosed with neuroblastoma, a type of childhood cancer, shortly before she turned one. In 2000, just after turning four, she informed her mother that she wanted to start a lemonade stand to raise money for doctors to help children. Her first lemonade stand raised 2,000 dollars and led to the creation of the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation. Alex continued her lemonade stands throughout her life, ultimately raising over one million dollars toward cancer research. She passed away in August 2004 at the age of eight. Today, Alex’s Lemonade Stand sponsors a national fundraising weekend in the United States which is popularly known as Lemonade Days. Each year, as many as 10,000 volunteers at more than 2,000 Alex’s Lemonade Stands make a difference for children with cancer.

What/Who Information What/Who When

Alex Scott (i) … birth (ii) …

(iii) … to help wanted to start a (iv)… in 2000

She (v) … lemonade stands throughout her (vi) …

(vii) … United States (viii) … every year

10,000 volunteers (ix) … doing something for each (x) …

of 2,000 Alex’s children with cancer

Lemonade Stands

Or. Read the above text and make a flow chart showing the activities of Alex. 10

  1. Starting a lemonade stand 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-2

  1. Ans. (i) Connecticut, (ii) 1996, (iii) Alex, (iv) lemonade stand, (v) continued, (vi) life, (vii) Alex’s Lemonade Stand, (viii) national fundraising weekend, (ix) America, (x) year.
  2. Ans. Or. (1) Starting a lemonade stand (2) raised money for doctors to help children (3) raised 2000 dollars her first lemonade stand (4) inspired her to build the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation (5) continued her lemonade stands throughout her life (6) making a difference for children with cancer.

 

Set-3
2. Read the passage and complete the table. 10

I am in a tiny steel cage attached to a motorcycle, stuttering through traffic in Dhaka, Bangladesh. In the last ten minutes, we have moved forward maybe three feet, inch by inch, the driver wrenching the wheel left and right, wriggling deeper into the wedge between delivery truck and a rickshaw in front of us. Up ahead, the traffic is jammed so close together that pedestrians are climbing over pickup trucks and through empty rickshaws to cross the street. Two rows to my left is an ambulance, blue light spinning uselessly. This is what the streets here look like from seven o’clock in the morning until ten o’clock at night. If you’re rich, you experience it from the back seat of a car. If you’re poor, you’re in a rickshaw, breathing in the exhaust. 

I’m sitting in the back of a CNG, a three- wheeled motorcycle shaped like a slice of pie and covered with scrap metal. I’m here working on a human rights project, but whenever I ask people in Dhaka what they think international organizations should really be working on, they tell me about the traffic. Alleviating traffic congestion is one of the major development challenges of our time. Half the world’s population already lives in cities, and the United Nations (UN) estimates that the proportion will rise to nearly 70 percent by 2050. Dhaka, the world’s densest and fastest growing city, is a case study in how this problem got so bad and why it’s so difficult to solve. Dhaka’s infrastructure doesn’t match the scale of its population. Just 7 percent of the city is covered by roads, compared with around 25 percent of Paris and Vienna. Dhaka also suffers from the absence of a planned road network. There are 650 major intersections, but only 60 traffic lights, many of which don’t work. That means the police force isn’t enforcing driving or parking rules; they’re in the intersections, directing traffic. 
The cost of Dhaka’s traffic congestion is estimated at $3.8 billion a year, and that’s just the delays and air pollution, not the less-tangible losses in quality of life. Paradoxically, the poor infrastructure is one of the reasons why the city is growing so fast. Without roads or trains to whisk them to the suburbs, Dhaka residents have no choice but to crowd into the middle, set up slums between high-rises, and walk to work.

Who/What Event/Activity Where/Place When/How long

The CNG/The writer moved forward by three feet (i) …. (ii) ….

One of the major development challenges (iii) …. at present 

(iv) …. lives in cities (v) ….

7 percent area (vi) ….. in Dhaka at present.

About 25 percent is covered by roads (vii) …. 

The police directs traffic (viii) …. 

(ix) …. costs $3.8 billion in Dhaka (x) ….

  1. Or. Based on your reading of the passage, make short notes in each of the boxes in the flow-chart

showing the causes for traffic congestions in Dhaka. 

  1. The world’s densest and fastest growing city 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-3

  1. Ans. (i) In the street of Dhaka, Bangladesh (ii) ten minutes (iii) alleviating traffic congestion (iv) Half the world’s population (v) at present (vi) is covered by roads (vii) in Paris and Vienna (viii) in the intersections (ix) Traffic congestion (x) a year.
  2. Ans. Or. 1. The world’s densest and fastest growing city 2. Inadequate infrastructure in terms of population 3. Just 7 percent of the city covered by roads 4. The absence of a planned road network 5. 650 major intersections with only 60 traffic lights 6. No strict enforcement of driving or parking rules.

 

Set-5
2. Read the passage and complete the table below: 10

Children’s right to education also implies that the school they go to will have a pleasant and learning-friendly environment where everyone will have an enjoyable time. Teachers will be kind, caring and supportive and children will feel relaxed. No harsh words will be spoken to them and special care will be taken of children with learning disabilities. That unfortunately is not the general picture in our schools. The system of education in our part of the world does not allow children much freedom, and classrooms look more like cages where they are pent up for hours. Rabindranath Tagore (read his ‘An Eastern University’ in Unit Six) found it unacceptable; so did William Blake (1757-1857), an English poet and painter, whose favorite subjects included children. In his poem ‘The School Boy’ Blake writes about a young boy who is unhappy with his school where dour-faced teachers give joyless lessons. He would rather like to be outdoors and enjoy the summer day. He pleads with his parents to rescue him from the drudgery of school.

What/Who Source/Information What/Where When

Our (i) … existing at present not allowing (ii) … during school time

A young boy (iii) … unhappy (iv) …

The (v) … according to Tagore’s essay (vi) … during the classes

The boy (vii) … enjoying time in (viii) …

(ix) … of The School Boy requesting for (x) … school time

  1. Or. Read the above text and make a flow chart showing the problems of school in our part of

the world. 10

  1. Having no learning friendly environment 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-5

  1. Ans.(i) education system, (ii) much freedom, (iii) The School Boy, (iv) during showering joyless lessons, (v) students, (vi) penting up, (vii) in Blake’s poem, (viii) summer days, (ix) The boy, (x) rescue.
    2. Ans.Or. (1) Having no learning friendly environment (2) play no caring and supportive role by the teacher (3) taken no care of the students with low caliber (4) not enjoying enough freedom by the students (5) crowded classroom (6) dour-faced teachers.

Set-6

  1. Read the passage and complete the table below: 10

The tests indicated that poultry feed in the country had also been contaminated, as samples of chicken and fish contained traces of antibiotics. High microbial populations were found in several samples of pasteurized milk, indicating poor processing procedures by the manufacturers. Samples of cucumber and street foods also showed high microbial populations, suggesting widespread contamination in the water supply. The Director of Institute of Public Health (IPH), told the Dhaka Tribune that the survey report has been submitted to the Health Ministry. Further tests of different products were being carried out at the Food Safety Lab. A former Director General of the Health Service and senior national adviser of the FAO, said the findings were shocking for the whole nation. He added that instead of focusing only on the end products, the issue should be addressed at the root level. Pointing out that there were four steps in the production process-farmer, transport, wholesale, and retail trader. He said better monitoring and supervision were mandatory for stopping food adulteration.
Adulterated food products are reportedly the cause behind thousands of people suffering from fatal diseases like cancer, kidney failure and heart problems. Health specialists told the Dhaka Tribute that the Ministry of Food had enacted a Food Safety Act, but was yet to prepare the necessary rules. As the issue of food safety was also linked to 14 other ministries, a coordinated agency should take responsibility of ensuring safety in food products, they added.

What/Who Source/Information What/Where When

Samples of (i) … poultry feed in the country (ii) … after testing

The manufactures in several (iii) … high microbial (iv) … after testing

Better monitoring and (v) … mandatory for stoping adulteration (vi) … always

Samples of (vii) … water supply (viii) … survey

(ix) … being carried out (x) … after the first test

Or. Read the above text and make a flow chart showing the steps of preventing food adulteration. 10

  1. Monitoring the food level of production 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-6

  1. Ans.(i) chicken and fish, (ii) traces of antibiotics, (iii) samples of pasteurized milk, (iv) populations, (v) supervision, (vi) in Dhaka, (vii) cucumber and street foods, (viii) high microbial populations, (ix) Further tests of different products, (x) the Food Safety Lab.
  2. Ans.Or. (1) Monitoring the food level of production (2) ensuring proper food processing (3) regular supervision (4) applying rules strictly (5) inflicting heavy punishment (6) forming a coordinated agency.


Set-7
2. Read the passage and complete the table below. 10

I caught sight of her at the play, and in answer to her beckoning, I went over during the interval and sat down beside her. It was long since I had last seen her, and if someone had not mentioned her name I hardly think I would have recognized her. She addressed me brightly. ‘Well, it’s many years since we first met. How time does fly! We’re none of us getting any younger. Do you remember the first time I saw you? You asked me to luncheon.’

Did I remember?

It was twenty years ago and I was living in Paris. I had a tiny apartment in the Latin quarter overlooking a cemetery, and I was earning barely enough money to keep body and soul together. She had read a book of mine and had written to me about it. I answered, thanking her, and presently I received from her another letter saying that she was passing through Paris and would like to have a chat with me; but her time was limited, and the only free moment she had was on the following Thursday; she was spending the morning at the Luxembourg and would I give her a little luncheon at Foyot’s afterwards? Foyot’s is a restaurant at which the French senators eat, and it was so far beyond my means that I had never even thought of going there. But I was flattered, and I was too young to have learned to say no to a woman…. I had eighty francs (gold francs) to last me the rest of the month, and a modest luncheon should not cost more than fifteen. If I cut out coffee for the next two weeks I could manage well enough. 

I answered that I would meet my friend-by correspondence at Foyot’s Thursday at half-past twelve. She was not so young as I expected and in appearance imposing rather than attractive. She was, in fact, a woman of forty… and she gave me the impression of having more teeth, white and large and even, than were necessary for any practical purpose. She was talkative, but since she seemed inclined to talk about me I was prepared to be an attentive listener.

Who/What Event/Activity Where/Place When/How long

The writer caught sight of the lady guest (i) .… 20 years after the lunch at Foyot’s.

(ii) .… sat down beside her (iii) .…

The writer (iv) .… in Paris (v) .…

The Lady requested the writer to give her a lunch (vi) .… on Thursday,

(vii) .… usually cat at Foyot’s often.

The writer (viii) .… in his pocket. 

The writer wanted to meet the lady at Foyot’s (ix) .…

(x) .… was a woman of forty.

  1. Or. Based on your reading of the passage, make short notes in each of the boxes in the flow-chart showing the information about the lady entertained by the writer. 10
  2. Not so young as expected by the writer 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-7

  1. Ans. (i) at the play (ii) The writer (iii) during the interval (iv) was living (v) 20 years ago (vi) at Foyot’s (vii) French senators (viii) had eighty francs (ix) on Thursday at half-past twelve (x) The lady.
    2. Ans. Or. 1. Not so young as expected by the writer 2. Imposing rather than attractive in appearance 3. A woman of forty 4. Gave the impression of having more teeth than were necessary for any practical purpose 5. Talkative 6. Seemed inclined to talk about the writer.

  2. Read the passage and complete the table below: 10

I was startled when the bill of fare was brought, for the prices were a great deal higher than I had anticipated. But she reassured me. ‘I never eat anything for luncheon,’ she said. ‘Oh, don’t say that!’ I answered generously. ‘I never eat more than one thing. I think people eat far too much nowadays. A little fish, perhaps. I wonder if they have any salmon.’ Well, it was early in the year for salmon and it was not on the bill of fare, but I asked the waiter if there was any. Yes, a beautiful salmon had just come in, it was the first they had had. I ordered it for my guest.

The waiter asked her if she would have something while it was being cooked. ‘No,’ she answered, ‘I never eat more than one thing unless you have a little caviare, I never mind caviare.’ My heart sank a little. I knew I could not afford caviare, but I could not very well tell her that. I told the waiter by all means to bring caviare. For myself I chose the cheapest dish on the menu and that was a mutton chop.
‘I think you are unwise to eat meat,’ she said. ‘I don’t know how you can expect to work after eating heavy things chops. I don’t believe in overloading my stomach.’

Then came the question of drink. ‘I never drink anything for luncheon,’ she said. ‘Neither do I,’ I answered promptly. ‘Except white wine,’ she proceeded as though I had not spoken. ‘These French white wines are so light. They’re wonderful for the digestion.’ ‘What would you like?’ I asked, hospitable still, but not exactly emotional.

She gave me a bright and amicable flash of her white teeth. ‘My doctor won’t let me drink anything but champagne.’ I imagine I turned a little pale. I ordered half a bottle. I mentioned casually that my doctor had absolutely forbidden me to drink champagne. ‘What are you going to drink, then?’ ‘Water.’

Who/What Event/Activity Where/Place When/How long

The writer (i) …. at Foyot’s when the bill of fare was brought

(ii) …. never eats more than one thing at lunch

The lady guest thinks people eat far too much (iii) ….

Salmon was not shown (iv) …. Early in the season

(v) …. had come In the restaurant Just then

The lady guest (vi) …. while the salmon being cooked

(vii) …. was the cheapest dish on the menu

The lady guest took champagne (viii) ….

The writer (ix) …. at Foyot’s (x) ….

  1. Or. Based on your reading of the passage, make short notes in each of the boxes in the flow-chart showing the names of food and drinks taken by the lady guest and the writer. 10
  2. Salmon fish 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-8

  1. Ans: (i) was startled (ii) The lady guest (iii) nowadays (iv) on the bill of fare (v) a beautiful salmon (vi) wanted to have caviare (vii) Mutton chop (viii) at Foyot’s (ix) took water (x) at lunch.
    2. Or. Ans: (1) Salmon fish (2) caviare (3) mutton chop (4) French white wine (5) champagne (6) water.

Set-9

  1. Read the passage and complete the table below. 10

I was past caring now. So I ordered coffee for myself and an ice cream and coffee for her. ‘You know, there’s one thing I thoroughly believe in,’ she said, as she ate the ice cream, ‘One should always get up from a meal feeling one could eat a little more.’ ‘Are you still hungry?’ I asked faintly. ‘Oh, no, I’m not hungry; you see , I don’t eat luncheon. I have a cup of coffee in the morning and then dinner, but I never eat more than one thing for luncheon. I was speaking for you.’ ‘Oh, I see!’ Then a terrible thing happened. While we were waiting for the coffee, the head waiter, with an ingratiating smile on his false face, came up to us bearing a large basket full of huge peaches. They had the blush of an innocent girl; they had the rich tone of an Italian landscape. But surely peaches were not in season then? Lord knew what they cost. ‘You see, you’ve filled your stomach with a lot of meat’ – my one miserable little chop- ‘and you can’t eat any more. But I’ve just had a snack and I shall enjoy a peach’.
The bill came and when I paid it I found that I had only enough for a quite inadequate tip. Her eyes rested for an instant on the three francs I left for the waiter, and I knew that she thought me mean. But when I walked out of the restaurant I had the whole month before me and not a penny in my pocket. ‘Follow my example,’ she said as we shook hand, and never eat more than one thing for luncheon. ‘I’ll do better than that’, I retorted. ‘I’ll eat nothing for dinner to-night.’ ‘Humorist!’ she cried gaily, jumping into a cab, ‘you’re quite a humorist!’ But I have had my revenge at last. I do not believe that I am a vindictive man, but when the immortal gods take a hand in the matter it is pardonable to observe the result with complacency. Today she weighs twenty-one stone.

Who/What Event/Activity Where/Place When/How long

One should get up feeling one could eat a little more from a meal (i)…………………..

(ii)……………. would have a coffee in the morning.

The head waiter (iii)…………………………… while they were waiting for coffee.

The head waiter Had an ingratiating smile (iv)………….

(v)… had the blush of an innocent girl.

The eyes of the lady guest (vi)… on the three francs for an instant.

The waiter (vii)… in his pocket when he walked out of the restaurant.

(viii)… would eat nothing for dinner that night.

The writer has had his revenge (ix)…

The lady guest (x)… today.

  1. Or. Based on your reading of the passage, make short notes in each of the boxes in the flow-chart showing the information about the peaches. 10
  2. The head waiter came up to them with the peaches 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-9

  1. Ans. (i) always (ii) The lady guest (iii) came with a basket of peach (iv) on his false face (v) The peaches (vi) rested (vii) did not have a penny (viii) The writer (ix) at last (x) weighs twenty-one stone.
    2. Ans. Or. 1. The head waiter came up to them with the peaches. 2. The peaches were huge. 3. They had the blush of an innocent girl. 4. They had the rich tone of an Italian landscape. 5. Peaches were not in season then. 6. The writer wondered about their cost.

Set-10

  1. Read the passage and complete the table below. 10

Shilpi was only 15 years old when she married Rashid in 2008. Marrying off daughters at an early age is a standard practice for many families living in rural Bangladesh. After her wedding, Shilpi joined a local empowerment group that provides adolescent girls with the tools needed to gradually change cultural practices, particularly those pertaining to early marriage and pregnancy. The group’s activities include discussions on how to most effectively change behaviour related to reproductive health as well as one-on- one counseling. It also offers peer-to-peer support and life skills training that help adolescents say no to early marriage. The empowerment group is one of more then 10,000 groups supported by some local Non Government Organizations (NGOs) working all over Bangladesh. These NGOs work through Canada’s Adolescent Reproductive Health Project which also aims to increase access to quality health services for adolescents. During one of the group sessions, Shilpi came to understand the potentially harmful effects of early marriage and pregnancy.
While maternal mortality in Bangladesh has declined by nearly 40 percent since 2001, the rate remains high with 194 maternal deaths per 100,000, live births in 2010- dropping from 322 in 2001 with a projected decrease to 143 by 2015. Girls who get pregnant are at risk of serious health complications. These include dangerous hemorrhage and fistula, a painful internal injury caused by obstructed childbirth that commonly leads to serious maternal morbidities and social exclusion. When Shilpi heard about those risks, she invited her husband, Rashid, to discuss pregnancy with a counselor. After hearing about the risks, Rashid agreed to delay having children for five years despite pressures from his parents and neighbors to produce an offspring. Together, the couple met with a female health care provider, who informed them about the various family planning options available.
Shilpi’s mother-in-law and neighbors continued to pressurize the newlyweds. Deeply rooted cultural practices and traditions caused a rift between Shilpi and Rashid and their extended family, some of whose members insulted and criticized the couple. Unable to convince their close relatives of the risks, Shilpi and Rashid returned to the counselor. They took the help of a parent peer who has been trained to speak to other parents about adolescent issues. Shilpi’s mother-in-law and neighbors eventually came to understand the harmful effects of early pregnancy on mother and child. Today, the village no longer pressurizes the couple; their parents and neighbors now support them and speak out against early marriage and pregnancy.

What/Who Source/Event What/Where When/Information

Shilpi (i) … Rashid 15 years old (ii) …

(iii) … come to know group session (iv) … about early marriage

and pregnancy

The (v) … supported by Canada’s peer-to-peer support during

Adolescent Reproductive

Health Project

The NGO’s (vii) … is providing girls quality health services during (viii) …

The adolescent girls are provided by local (ix) … tools needed to one-on-one counseling.

gradually change (x) …

Or. Read the above text and make a flow chart showing the reasons of early marriage in Bangladesh.

10

  1. To establish cultural practice 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-10

  1. Ans. (i) married, (ii) 2008 (iii) She, (iv) harmful effects, (v) empowerment group, (vi) adolescence, (vii) aim, (viii) adolescence, (ix) empowerment group, (x) cultural practice.
  2. Ans.Or. (1) To establish cultural practice (2) considering daughter as burden (3) unconscious about the bad effect of early marriage

(4) unhealthy cultural practice (5) lack of standard education

(6) superstitious beliefs.

Set-11

  1. Read the passage and complete the table below: 10

Universities should never be made into mechanical organizations for collecting and distributing knowledge. Through them the people should offer their intellectual hospitality, their wealth of mind to others, and earn their proud right in return to receive gifts from the rest of the world. But in the whole length and breadth of India there is not a single University established in the modern time where a foreign or an Indian student can properly be acquainted with the best products of the Indian mind. For that we have to cross the sea, and knock at the doors of France and Germany. 

Educational institutions in our country are India’s alms-bowl of knowledge; they lower our intellectual self-respect; they encourage us to make a foolish display of decorations composed of borrowed feathers….Man’s intellect has a natural pride in its own aristocracy, which is the pride of its culture. Culture only acknowledges the excellence whose criticism is in its inner perfection, not in any external success. 
When this pride succumbs to some compulsion of necessity or lure of material advantage, it brings humiliation to the intellectual man. Modern India, through her very education, has been made to suffer this humiliation. Once she herself provided her children with a culture which was the product of her own ages of thought and creation. But it has been thrust aside, and we are made to tread the mill of passing examinations, not for learning anything, but for notifying that we are qualified for employments under organizations conducted in English. Our educated community is not a cultured community, but a community of qualified candidates.
 

Meanwhile the proportion of possible employments to the number of claimants has gradually been growing narrower, and the consequent disaffection has been widespread. At last the very authorities who are responsible for this are blaming their victims. Such is the perversity of human nature. It bears its worst grudge against those it has injured…

Who/What Event/Activity Where/Place When

A single University upholding the Indian mind. (i)… in India (ii)…

(iii)… are our alms-bowl of knowledge (iv)… 

Man’s intellect (v)… in its own aristocracy. 

(vi)… provided her children with a culture (vii)…

We are educated only to qualify to work (viii)… 

Our educated community (ix)… 

(x)… is increasing in proportion to employments in India day by day.

Or, Based on your reading of the passage, make short notes in each of the boxes in the flow-chart showing the information about an Eastern University. 10

  1. Mechanical organization for collecting and distributing knowledge 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-11

  1. Ans. (i) is not established (ii) in the modern time (iii) Educational institutions (iv) in India (v) has a natural pride (vi) India herself (vii) once (viii) in organizations conducted in English (ix) is not a cultured community (x) The number of claimants.
  2. Ans. Or. 1. Mechanical organization for collecting and distributing knowledge 2. Does not offer the intellectual hospitality to other 3. Cannot show the best products of the Indian mind 4. Alms-bowl of knowledge 5. Lowers our intellectual self-respect 6. Encourages a foolish display of decorations composed of borrowed feathers.


Set-12
2. Read the passage and complete the table below. 10

In the Bengali language there is a modern maxim which can be translated, ‘He who learns to read and write rides in a carriage and pair.’ In English there is a similar proverb, ‘Knowledge is power.’ It is an offer of a prospective bribe to the student, a promise of an ulterior reward which is more important than knowledge itself… Unfortunately, our very educational has been successful in depriving us of our real initiative and our courage of thought. The training we get in our schools has the constant implication in it that it is not for us to produce but to borrow. And we are casting about to borrow our educational plans from European institutions. The trampled plants of Indian corn are dreaming of recouping their harvest from the neighboring wheat fields. To change the figure, we forget that, for proficiency in walking, it is better to train the muscles of our own legs than to strut upon wooden ones of foreign make, although they clatter and cause more surprise at our skill in using them than if they were living and real.

But when we go to borrow help from a foreign neighborhood we overlook the fact…that among the Europeans the living spirit of the University is widely spread in their society, their parliament, their literature, and the numerous activities of their corporate life. In all these functions they are in perpetual touch with the great personality of the land which is creative and heroic in its constant acts of self-expression and self-sacrifice. They have their thoughts

published in their books as well as through the medium of living men who think those thoughts, and who criticize, compare and disseminate them. Some at least of the drawbacks of their academic education are redeemed by the living energy of the intellectual personality pervading their social organism. It is like the stagnant reservoir of water which finds its purification in the showers of rain to which it keeps itself open. But, to our misfortune, we have in India all the furniture of the European University except the human teacher…

Who/what Event/Activity Where/Place when

He who learns to read and write rides (i)…

(ii)… has been successful in depriving us of our real initiative and our courage of thought.
‘It is not for us to produce but to borrow’ is what we learn (iii)…

(iv)… borrow our educational plans (v)…

Among the Europeans the living spirit of the University (vi)… in their society their parliament, their literature, and the numerous activities of their corporate life.

(vii)… have their thoughts published (viii)…

(ix)… have all the furniture of the European University except the human teacher (x)…

2.Or, Based on your reading of the passage, make short notes in each of the boxes in the flow-chart showing the lacking of our education. 10

  1. Depriving us of our real initiative 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-12

  1. Ans.(i) in a carriage (ii) Our education (iii) in our schools (iv) We (v) from European institutions (vi) is widely spread (vii) The Europeans (viii) in their books (ix) We (x) in India.
    2.Ans. Or. 1. Depriving us of our real initiative 2. Depriving us of our courage of thought 3. The constant implication of our inability to produce something 4. We cannot but borrow from others 5. Our educational plans are borrowed from European institutions 6. Lack of the human teacher.

 

Part-1Set-13

  1. Read the passage and complete the table below. 10

Tertiary education in Bangladesh comprises two categories of institutions : degree awarding universities and colleges affiliated with the National University (NU). There were only 4 universities in Bangladesh at the time of independence in 1971. All of those universities were publicly financed autonomous entities. At present, there are 35 such universities. Private universities are a relatively new phenomenon in this country. In the early 1990s, the private sector came forward to establish universities. Since then the country has experienced a spectacular growth in private universities–mostly in and around Dhaka and couple of other large cities. At present, there are 79 private universities. The number of colleges providing tertiary level education is around 1,400. Most of them offer BA (pass) education of three year duration; only one-third of them offer BA (Honors) courses and some offer MA degrees as well. All of these colleges are affiliated with the National University.
Accessibility to higher education implies that students get the opportunity to get university education and sufficient support from educational institutions. Increasing enrolment at the secondary and higher secondary level puts pressure on higher educational institutions. But due to limited capacity, only a small number of students may be enrolled in universities. Thus, each year a large number of students are denied access to higher

education. Also, due to poverty and increase in educational

expenses, students of the lower middle class do not get easy access to higher education. Moreover, those who get places in the universities have limited access to avail all kinds of diversified educational facilities relating to their study fields. Only about 12 percent of graduates enter higher educational institutions. More than 80 Percent of these students are admitted to NU affiliated colleges. Others are absorbed by the public and private universities. In the last two decades, there has been a substantial rise in the number of students in private universities. According to the UGC Annual Report 2010, the number rose from 88,669 in 2005 to 2,00,752 in 2010.

Who/What Event/Activity Where/Place When

(i)… comprises two categories of institutions in Bangladesh

Four universities were (ii)… at the time of independence in 1971.

35 public universities are in Bangladesh (iii)…

Private universities (iv)… in this country

(v)… came forward to establish universities in the early 1990s.

The country has experienced a growth in private universities. (vi)…

Only about 12 percent of graduates (vii)… higher educational institutions.

More than 80 percent of these students are admitted to (viii)…

(ix)… is 2,00,752 in private universities (x)…

  1. Or. Based on your reading of the passage, make short notes in each of the boxes in the flow-chart showing the characteristics of public universities. 10
  2. Scope of studying on a wide range of subjects 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-13

  1. Ans. (i) Tertiary education (ii) in Bangladesh (iii) at present (iv) are a relatively new phenomenon (v) The private sector (vi) in and around Dhaka (vii) enter (viii) NU affiliated colleges (ix) The number of students (x) in 2010.
  2. Or. Ans. 1. Scope of studying on a wide range of subjects. 2. Attracting the best minds for teaching. 3. Better library, laboratory, Internet and research facilities. 4. Regular seminars, symposiums, lectures, workshops, debates and exhibitions. 5. Ample scope for national and international exposure. 6. Residential and boarding facilities at low cost/subsidized rates.

 

Set-14
2. Read the passage and complete the table below. 10

My name is Amerigo. I am 13 years old and I live on the street, alone. My mother, who is separated from my father, doesn’t want me. She told me to go away…Now she is married to another man. My father lives very far away. I want to go to him, but he won’t take me either. I begged him to send me some money so that I could buy a bus ticket. I am still waiting. He hasn’t answered.
The streets are now my home. Sometimes I find work. I used to collect trash and sell it to a vendor. I stopped doing that after I had a serious infection and a doctor told me to stay away from the trash dump. Once I worked for an ice cream shop owner and sold ice cream on the beach. But I got no money in return. The owner of the shop gave me something to eat, and let me sleep in his hut at night. The work was difficult and painful. The ice cream box is quite heavy when it is full. I had to walk for hours, offering my ice cream to whoever wanted to buy. There were days when I could not even sell one ice cream. In a way, I am lucky because I am alive. My friends who work sorting rubbish in dumps often suffer from serious diseases. One of them was recently killed after he fell into a hole that opened up in the pile of trash. Many of us work for 10 to 12 hours, and get so little in return that we can’t even buy food.
Shoe-shining is very popular among the street kids. A few of my friends also work in factories and workshops. A boy I know lost one of his eyes after a piece of hot glass flew into his eye at the glass factory where he worked. The owner refused to pay for medical help and fired him. For me, like all other children on the street, it is very hard. I am always hungry, and I don’t know where I will sleep the next night. I would like to live in my own home and sleep there in peace. The nights are very cold in the winter. You can die of cold in the street.

What/Who Event/Information What/Where When

Amerigo, 13 years old boy live (i) …

(ii) …
lives very far away since the separation with his mother

Amerigo’s home The street (iii) …

Amerigo sold ice cream (iv) …

(v) … let Amerigo sleep in his hut At night

Amerigo’s friends who work sorting rubbish (vi) … In dumps (vii) …

Amerigo would like to live (viii) …

The nights (ix) … in the winter

(x) … can die of cold In the street

  1. Or. Read the above text and make a flow chart showing the problems the street children usually face.

No. 1 has been done for you. 10

  1. serious diseases as a result of working with trash 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-14

Ans. 2. (i) on the street (ii) Amerigo’s father (iii) now (iv) on the beach (v) The owner of the ice cream shop (vi) suffer from serious diseases (vii) often (viii) in his own home (ix) are very cold (x) the street children.
Ans. 2. Or. (1) serious diseases as a result of working with trash (2) working 10 to 12 hours a day (3) earning very little, even not enough to buy food (4) hazardous working environment in factories and workshops (5) no specific place for passing the night (6) no protection from cold winter nights.

 

  1. Read the passage below and complete the table. 10

Water, water, everywhere,

And all the boards did shrink;

Water, water, everywhere,

Nor any drop to drink.

Coleridge’s poem, a ballad, narrates the harrowing sea-voyage of an old mariner who at one point of his journey didn’t have any water to drink because of a curse. Cursed or not, we know how important drinking water is in our life. We know we cannot survive without it. In fact two-thirds of our body is made up of water. Not for nothing is it said that the other name of water is life. Is there a crisis in our time with regard to access to clean drinking water? The United Nations in a meeting on the eve of the new millennium identified the drinking water problem as one of the challenges for the future. But do we need to worry about the problem as ours is a land of rivers and we have plenty of rainfall? Besides, we have a sea in our backyard too.

One of the sources of water in our country is the rivers. Rivers are everywhere in our life, literature, economy and culture. But are the rivers in good shape? Unfortunately, they are not. A few are already dead and several are going through the pangs of death. The river Buriganga is an example of a dying river. A report published in the Daily Sun describes what has happened to the river Buriganga and why. It’s water is polluted and a perpetual stench fills the air around it. But that is not what it was like before. The report says that the river had a glorious past. Once it was a tributary of the mighty Ganges and flowed into the Bay of Bengal through the river Dhaleshwari. Gradually, it lost its link with the Ganges and got the name Buriganga. The Mughals marveled at the tide level of the Buriganga and founded their capital Jahangirnagar on its banks in 1610. The river supplied drinking water and supported trade and commerce. Jahangirnagar was renamed Dhaka which grew into a heavily populated city with a chronic shortage of space. The city paid back the bounty of the river by sucking life out of it! According to newspaper report, the Buriganga is dying because of pollution. Huge quantities of toxic chemicals and wastes from mills and factories, hospitals and clinics and household and other establishments are dumped into the river everyday. The city of Dhaka discharges about 4500 tons of solid waste every day and most of it is directly released into the Buriganga. According to the Department of the Environment (DoE), 20,000 tons of tannery waste, including some highly toxic materials, are released into the river every day. Experts identified nine industrial areas in and around the capital city as the primary sources of river pollution: Tongi, Tejgaon, Hazaribagh, Tarabo, Narayanganj, Savar, Gazipur, Dhaka, Export Processing Zone and Ghorashal.

The river would need a monster’s stomach to digest all the wastes mentioned above. There is a limit up to which it can put up with its cruel and thoughtless treatment. We the humans have successfully killed one of our rivers. There are other rivers in the country that are being subjected to similar thoughtless treatment. Unless we take care of our rivers there may come a time when we will cry ‘water’ and find it nowhere.

What/Who Event / Information What / Where When

(i).………. marveled at the tide (ii).….. before 1610

The Mughals founded (iii).………. Jahangirnagar on its banks (iv).….

(v).……….. supplied (vi).…………

It’s water being polluted and (vii).……… the air around it (viii)….

(ix).………. was a tributary of (x).…………. once

  1. Or. Read the above text and make a flow chart showing why the river Buriganga was important in the past. 10
  2. Having a glorious past 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-15

Ans. 2. (i) The Mughals, (ii) level of the Bauriganga, (iii) their capital, (iv) in 1610, (v) The Buriganga, (vi) drinking water, (vii) a filling, (viii) at present, (ix) The Buriganga, (x) the mighty Ganges.
Ans. 2. Or. (1) Having a glorious past (2) discharging tannery wastes (3) discharging medical wastes (4) discharging hospital wastes (5) discharging household wastes (6) encroachment of the river.