Rules of Flow chart

Rules of Flow Chart

  1. At first give a title.
  2. Use 6 (six) rectangular/square boxes including the given box.
  3. Boxes can be horizontal or vertical.
  4. Use arrow sign between two boxes.
  5. Use numeric letters serially in each box.
  6. Start points with capital letters.
  7. Start points according to the given box in the question. For example:
Rules Examples
a.       Verb + ing + noun/noun phrase Enlightening the individual, Broadening our outlook,  Ennobling our mind,  Refining our sensibility,  Learning about a society’s culture
b.       By + verb + ing + noun/noun phrase By increasing popularity of band and pop music, By traveling by the British, By using language and music, By using the tools and objects
c.       For + verb + ing + noun/noun Phrase For having a glorious past, For discharging tannery wastes, For discharging medical wastes, For discharging hospital wastes, For discharging household wastes, For encroaching of the river
d.       To + verb + noun/noun phrase To tame wild animals, To ride on a Tiger, To defeat a crocodile, To protect  from wild animals, To hold a snake in his hand, To help people cultivate land
e.       Noun + of + noun Phrase Loss of popularity of entertainment, Source of entertainment, Medium of distance education, Instrument of information, Creation of cultural assault
f.        Noun/noun Phrase Honesty, Integrity, Courage, Responsibility, Graciousness, Gratefulness
g.       Verb + Others Born in 1929, Given a diary in 1942, Spent from 1942 to 1944 in hiding, Wrote diary, Died in 1945, Published the diary in 1947
h.      Adverbial/preposition + noun/noun phrase By proper planning, For higher education
  1. Maintain order.
  2. Writing points precisely avoiding article, adverb etc.
  3. Avoid punctuation at last of each point.

 

 

 

Example

A

Diasporas of the world and their causes

  1. Diasporasoccurring either under coercion or on people s desire to leave
  2. Manydiasporasoccurring inthe world
  3. One of the great diasporas being that of the Jewish people
  4. Jewishpeopleforcibly leaving their countr
  5. Another noteworthydiaspora being that of Aryans
  6. Ravages of nature being another reason of diasporas

 

B

Some important Diasporas and their causes

  1. Diaspora of Jewish people
  2. Many incidents of diasporas occurring in the world
  3. The causes of Aryan diaspora being nuclear
  4. Massive diaspora happening in Africa
  5. Another noteworthy diaspora being that of Aryan
  6. Globalization being one of the chief reasons of diaspora

 

C

Major diasporas in the past

  1. Jews forced to leave their land in ancient time
  2. A noteworthy movement of Aryans from central Europe to the Indian subcontinent thousands of years
  3. The Palestinian diaspora causing great plight in twentieth century
  4. African diaspora because of war
  5. African diaspora owing to the ravages of nature
  6. Bangladeshi diaspora in 1971 owing to war

 

D

Causes and aspects of conflict

  1. Disagreement among parties or individuals fueling conflict
  2. Opposition among parties or individuals fueling conflict
  3. An attempt to reach an objective different from that of the other party giving rise to conflict
  4. The elements of conflict having varied sets of principles and values
  5. Conflict pertaining to opposing ideas and actions of different entities
  6. Conflict leading to antagonistic state

 

E

Characteristics of conflict

  1. A disagreement
  2. Opposition among parties or individuals fueling conflict
  3. An attempt to reach an objective different from that of the other party giving right to Conflict
  4. The element of conflict having varied sets of principles and values
  5. Conflict pertaining to opposing ideas and actions of different entities
  6. Conflict leading to antagonistic states

 

F

Advantages and disadvantages of conflict

  1. Described as disagreement
  2. Opposition among parties or individuals fueling conflict
  3. An attempt to reach an objective different from that of the other party giving rise conflict
  4. The elements of conflicts having varied sets of principles and values.
  5. Conflict pertaining to opposing ideas and actions of different entities
  6. Conflict being an opportunity for learning and understanding our differences

 

G

Special aspect of a craftwork

  1. A practical from of art
  2. The product of a society and culture
  3. Representing the all embracing nature of folk imagination
  4. Reflecting the community aesthetics, values and beliefs
  5. Reflecting the culture ambition of the community
  6. Greatly enticing and attractive

 

H

Factors that influence craftwork

  1. Individual creativity
  2. Community aesthetics
  3. Utility functions
  4. Human values
  5. Distraction by the makers desire
  6. The factor determining the form and content of a craftwork

 

I

Bad effects of education linked with culture

  1. Succumbs to some compulsion of necessity or lure of material advantage
  2. Brings humiliation to the intellectuals
  3. Made to trade the mill of passing examinations, not far learning anything
  4. Creates an educated community, not a cultured community
  5. Gradual decrease of the proportion of possible employments
  6. Shows the perversity of human nature

 

J

Comments of the author on Indian and Bangladeshi universities

  1. Universities not to be considered to be mechanical organization to collect and distributing knowledge
  2. People to offer their intellectual hospitality through universities
  3. Not a single good university established in the modern time in the whole India
  4. The best products of Indian mind not known
  5. Indians students going overseas for proper education
  6. Regarding educational institutions as India s alms bowl of knowledge

 

K

Information about Western Universities

  1. Mechanical organization for collecting and distributing knowledge
  2. The people of the university not offering their intellectual hospitality
  3. Not acquainting the learners with the best products of the Indian mind
  4. Indians alms bowl of knowledge
  5. Lowering our intellectual self respect by encouraging us to make a foolish display of decorations composed of borrowed feathers
  6. Not producing a cultured community but a community of qualified candidates

 

Try yourself

Read the following text and make a flow chart showing the perception of beauty.           

Beauty is easy to appreciate but difficult to define. As we look around, we discover beauty in pleasurable objects and sights—in nature, in the laughter of children, in the kindness of strangers. But asked to define, we run into difficulties. Does beauty have an independent objective identity? Is it universal or is it dependent on our sense perceptions? Does it lie in the eye of the beholder? we ask ourselves. A further difficulty arises when beauty manifests itself not only by its presence, but by its absence as well. as when we are repulsed by ugliness and desire beauty. But then ugliness has as much a place in our lives as beauty or may be more—as when there is widespread hunger and injustice in a society. Philosophers have told us that beauty is an important part of life, but isn’t ugliness a part of life too? And if art has beauty as an important ingredient, can it confine itself only to a projection of beauty? Can art ignore what is not beautiful?

  1. Beauty being easy to appreciate
  2. Beauty being difficult to define
  3. Beauty being discovered inpleasurable objects in nature
  4. Beauty prevailing in the laughter of children and in the kindness of strangers
  5. Beauty having an independent objective identity
  6. Beauty being an important part of life with the ugliness as a part of life

 

Read the following text and make a flow chart showing the conditions of adolescent girls in Bangladesh.

When adolescent girls are pulled out of school, either for marriage or work, they often lose their mobility, their friends and social status. The lack of mobility among adolescent girls also curtails their economic and non-formal educational opportunities. Moreover, they lack information about health issues. According to a study, only about three in five adolescents have even heard of HIV. It is also reported that more than 50 percent of adolescent girls are undernourished and suffer from anaemia. Adolescent fertility is also high in Bangladesh. The contribution of the adolescent fertility rate to the total fertility rate increased from 20.3% in 1993 to 24.4% in 2007. Moreover, neonatal mortality is another concern for younger mothers.

  1. Pulling out of school, either for marriage or work

 

Read the following text and make a flow chart showing the causes of the destruction of the Sundarbans and its effect.

The Sundarbans is known for vanishing islands but the scientists said the current retreat of the mangrove forests on the southern coastline is not normal. “The causes for increasing coastline retreat, other than direct anthropogenic ones, include increased frequency of storm surges and other extreme natural events, rises in sea level and increased salinity which increases the vulnerability of mangroves,” said Pettorelli.

“Our results indicate a rapidly retreating coastline that cannot be accounted for by the regular dynamics of the Sundarbans. Degradation is happening fast, weakening this natural shield for India and Bangladesh.”

“As human development thrives, and global temperature continues to rise, natural protection from tidal waves and cyclones is being degraded at alarming rates. This will inevitably lead to species loss in this richly biodiverse part of the world, if nothing is done to stop it.”

“The Sundarbans is a critical tiger habitat; one of only a handful of remaining forests big enough to hold several hundred tigers. To lose the Sundarbans would be to move a step closer to the extinction of these majestic animals,” said ZSL tiger expert Sarah Christie.

  1. Increased frequency of storm surges

Read the following text and make a flow chart showing the importance of the Hakaluki Haor.

Hakaluki Haor is one of the major wetlands of Bangladesh. The Haor system provides a wide range of economic and non-economic benefits to the local people as well as to the people of Bangladesh. These include fish production, rice production, cattle and buffalo rearing, duck rearing, collection of reeds and grasses, and collection of aquatic and other plants. The Haor system also protects the lower floodplants from flash floods occuring in the moths of April-May, maintains the supply of fish in other lower water bodies and provides habitat for migratory and local waterfowls.

  1. Providing economic benefits

Read the following text and make a flow chart showing the goals of peace movement

A peace movement is a social movement that seeks to achieve ideals such as the ending of a particular war (or all wars), minimize inter-human violence in a particular place or type of situation, including ban of guns, and is often linked to the goal of achieving world peace. Means to achieve these ends include advocacy of pacifism, non-violent resistance, diplomacy, boycotts, demonstrations, peace camps; supporting anti-war political candidates and banning guns, creating open government, direct democracy; supporting people who expose war- crimes or conspiracies to create wars, and making laws. Different organizations involved in peace movements may have some diverse goals, but one common goal is sustainability of peace.

 

Peace movement is basically an all-encompassing “anti-war movement”. It is primarily characterized by a belief that human beings should not wage war on each other or engage in violent conflicts over language, race, natural resources, religion or ideology. It is believed that military power is not the equivalent of justice. The peace movement tends to oppose the proliferation of dangerous technologies and weapons of mass destruction in particular, nuclear weapons and biological warfare. Moreover, many object to the export of weapons including hand-held machine guns and grenades by leading economic nations to lesser developed nations.

Read the following text and make a flow chart showing the goals of peace movement

  1. Introduction of peace movement

 

Read the following text and make a flow chart showing about Gazi Pir and his activities

According to some myths and legends, Gazi Pir was a Muslim saint who is said to have spread Islam in the parts of Bengal close to the Sundarbans. He was credited with many miracles. For example, he could supposedly calm dangerous animals and make them docile. He is usually depicted in paats or scroll paintings riding a fierce-looking Bengal tiger, a snake in his hand, but in no apparent danger. According to some stories, he also fought crocodiles who threatened the people of a region full of canals and creeks, indeed, a kind of watery jungle bordering the Bay of Bengal. Because of his alert and vigilant presence, all predatory animals were said to have been kept within bounds. It was also believed that he enabled villagers to live close to forests and jungles and cultivate their lands. The story of Gazi Pir has been preserved in folk literature as well as art and has been performed in indigenous theatre.

  1. A Muslim Paint

 

Read the passage below and make short notes in each of the boxes in the flow-chart showing the etiquette and manners a child should follow.

As a child you must have been told to greet your elders and visitors to your home according to your culture and tradition. You must also have been taught to be polite in company and keep quiet while others, especially your elders, spoke. Possibly, you at times grudged such schooling. Possibly, at times you even protested such disciplining. Now, certainly you know that you can’t always behave the way you want specially in the presence of others. There are rules of behaviour you have to follow in a company. We are social beings and have to consider the effect of our behaviour on others, even if we are at home and dealing with our family members.

We have two terms to describe our social behaviour–‘etiquette’ and ‘manners’. ‘Etiquette’ is a French word and it means the rules of correct behaviour in society. The word ‘manners’ means the behaviour that is considered to be polite in a particular society or culture. Manners can be good or bad. For example, it is a bad manner to speak with food in one’s mouth. No one likes a bad-mannered person. Remember that etiquette and manners vary from culture to culture and from society to society.

We learn etiquette and manners from our parents, families and various institutions, such as schools, colleges or professional bodies. There are rules of behaviour for all kinds of social occasions and it is important to learn them and practise them in everyday life. The manners that are correct in a wedding reception will not do in a debating club. Therefore, we have to be careful about etiquette and manners. We know how important it is to say ‘please’ and ‘thank you’ in everyday life. A few more polite expressions such as ‘pardon me’, ‘excuse me’, ‘may I’, are bound to make your day smooth and pleasant.

  1. Greeting elders and visitors at home

 

Read the following text and make a flow chart showing how a child becomes acquainted with its culture/manners/etiquette. (one is done for you)

  1. Learning from family

 

Conflict can be described as a disagreement among groups or individuals characterized by antagonism and hostility. This is usually fueled by the opposition of one party to another in an attempt to reach an objective different from that of the other party. The elements involved in the conflict have varied sets of principles and values, thus allowing a conflict to arise.

Conflict can be defined in many ways but one of the simplest is that it pertains to the opposing ideas and actions of different entities, resulting in an antagonistic state. Conflict is an inevitable part of life. All of us possess our own opinions, ideas and sets of beliefs. We have our own ways of looking at things and we act according to what we think is proper. Hence, we often find ourselves in conflict in different scenarios; it may involve other individuals, groups of people, or a struggle within our own selves. Consequently, conflict influences our actions and decisions in one way or another.

Conflict comes naturally; the clashing of thoughts and ideas is a part of the human experience. It is true that it can be destructive if left uncontrolled. However, it shouldn’t be seen as something that can only cause negative things to transpire. It is a way to come up with more meaningful realizations that can certainly be helpful to the individuals involved.

Conflict can be seen as an opportunity for learning and understanding our differences. We can all live harmoniously despite conflicts as long as we know how to responsibly manage these struggles.

  1. A disagreement among groups or individuals

 

A craftwork is an applied form of art, a social and cultural product reflecting the inclusive nature of folk imagination. A craftwork, which usually doesn’t bear the signature of its maker, retains a personal touch. When we look at a thirty year old nakshikantha, we wonder at its motifs and designs that point to the artistic ingenuity and the presence of the maker in it. The fact that we don’t know her name or any other details about her doesn’t take anything away from our appreciation of the artist. Indeed, the intimate nature of the kantha and the tactile feeling it generates animate the work and make it very inviting. A craftwork is shaped by the interaction of individual creativity and community aesthetics, utility functions and human values. It is distinguished by its maker’s desire to locate himself or herself in the wider and and ever-changing cultural aspirations of the community, and subsequently of the market. But even when the market is an important factor, community aesthetics remains the factor determining the form and content of the craftwork. The exquisite terracotta dolls from Dinajpur dating back to early 1940s that form a part of the Bangladesh National Museum’s collection were mostly bought from village fairs by some patron. They were no doubt meant to be consumer items, but the dolls reflect community aesthetics in such a manner that the market has not been able to impose its own preferences on them.

 

Read the following text and make a flow chart showing some objects that have influence on craftworks.

  1. Ever changing culture

 

A peace movement is a social movement that seeks to achieve ideals such as the ending of a particular war (or all wars), minimize inter-human violence in a particular place or type of situation, including ban of guns, and is often linked to the goal of achieving world peace. Means to achieve these ends include advocacy of pacifism, non-violent resistance, diplomacy, boycotts, demonstrations, peace camps; supporting anti-war political candidates and banning guns, creating open government, direct democracy; supporting people who expose war- crimes or conspiracies to create wars, and making laws. Different organizations involved in peace movements may have some diverse goals, but one common goal is sustainability of peace.

Peace movement is basically an all-encompassing “anti-war movement”. It is primarily characterized by a belief that human beings should not wage war on each other or engage in violent conflicts over language, race, natural resources, religion or ideology. It is believed that military power is not the equivalent of justice. The peace movement tends to oppose the proliferation of dangerous technologies and weapons of mass destruction in particular, nuclear weapons and biological warfare. Moreover, many object to the export of weapons including hand-held machine guns and grenades by leading economic nations to lesser developed nations.

Read the following text and make a flow chart showing the principles of peace movement.

  1. Anti-war attitude

Read the following text and make a flow chart showing the importance of Hakaluki Haor. (One is done for you).    10

The haor system provides a wide range of economic and non-economic benefits to the local people as well as to the people of Bangladesh. These include fish production, rice production, cattle and buffalo rearing, duck rearing, collection of reeds and grasses and collection of aquatic and other plants. The haor system also protects the lower flood plains from flash floods occurring in the months of April-May, maintains the supply of fish in other lower water bodies and provides habitat for migratory and local waterfowls

  1. Fish production
Advertisements