Textual gap filling, Updates

Textual Gap Filling

Read the following text and fill in the gaps with appropriate words to make it a meaningful one.

1. Folk songs have enriched our culture tremendously. The (a) — styles are followed in themes. words and (b) — of these songs. In the minds of common people the folk songs have (c) — for a long time. The history and (d) — of folk songs in our country are very rich. The most (e) — songs are Palligiti, Bhatiali, Bhawaiya, Jari, Sari, Lalongiti, etc.

2. Travelling by air is enjoyable and comfortable. But it is very important to ensure the (a) — along with other things. Oxygen mask is very (b) — for each passenger. Putting on life vest is (c) — mandatory when it is asked by the crew (d) —. A passenger should read the given information before (e) — off. In case of an emergency, they should take up bracing position.

3. The ethnic people in Bangladesh hold a very important (a) — in the culture of the country. The (b) — of these people live in the Chattogram Hill Tracts. The others live in the (c) — of Mymensingh, Rajshahi and Sylhet. They are mostly (d) —. By (e) — they are Hindus. Christians of Buddhists. They speak their own mother tongues.

4. Kartik Poramanik is really a nature (a) —. Out of his love to nature, he started his (b) — planting mission. He began to plant trees at a very early (c) —. He was greatly encouraged by his (d) —. He not only planted trees but also took great (e) — of them so that one day, each of his trees could be a gigantic one.

5. Bhabanipur is a typical Bangladeshi village in Jhenaidah. In this village, there lives an (a) — woman named Shamima Akhter Maya. Her willpower and (b) — have made her different She has seen the most cruel aspect of (c) —. But the cruelty could not (d) — her spirit. has become a winner (e) — all the odds of life.

6. The Bangladeshis have a (a) — food habit. Their food culture is enriched not only with delicious (b) — with appetizing items. For regular main (c) — boiled rice is served, with fishes, vegetables, meat etc. Hilsha is (d) — of the most popular fishes which is also our national Sweet is also a (e) — popular food here in Bangladesh

7. Folk songs are songs sung in (a) — traditional style of a community or (b) —. Here the traditional style includes the (c) — words and tunes of the songs (d) — have existed for a long time (e) — the common people.

8. River gypsies are an ethnic group of people in Bangladesh. They are known as bedey to (a) — people. The (b) — have their own lifestyle and (c) —. They live in groups and do not (d) — any land. Therefore, they live a nomadic life (e) — from one place to another.

9. River gypsies (a) — are known as ‘bedey to local people (b) — an ethnic group of people in Bangladesh. The gypsies have their own lifestyle and (c) —. They are habituated (d) — living in groups. They do not own any (e) —.

10. It was Sunday. Mita, Zara, Jhuma Islam and Mazharul Islam (a) — up very early. They quickly got ready and (b) — for Tha Kha floating market. They planned to have breakfast at the market. They (c) — the market place sharp at 7. The canals were surrounded with coconut, palm trees. hired a boat. The boatman started to (d) — slowly taking them to the centre of the market. There were boats everywhere. The sellers were mainly (e) — Thai women. Their small boats were laden with bundles of lotus flowers, farm-fresh coconuts, fruits, vegetables, local food and delicious sweets.

11. Fifteen-year old Shamima’s dreams were nipped in the bud. Her father wanted to marry her (a) — against her will. Marrying off (b) — girl under 18 is against the (c) — in Bangladesh did not want to (d) — married. But nobody paid any (e) — to her.

12. Thinking how people suffer in the heat, Kartik Poramanik began his tree-planting mission. (a) — Kartik would wake up early in the morning, take one or two labourers with him and (b) — out to plant trees. He would walk long (c)to plant trees, carrying with him some dry food and water. He would pay all the (d) — from his own pocket. Kartik planted trees beside the roads, in and (e) — the bazar, schools and colleges, open fields and many other places.

13. Zara and her parents have come from London to Bangladesh with a view to visiting her cousin. Mita and her parents. (a) — visiting some interesting places of Bangladesh, they decided to visit Thailand. Mita’s parents could not go (b) — them because of their works. Mita is very (c) — about her first plane journey. Mita, Zara and her parents fill up the immigration (d) — before going through the immigration. The immigration officer will check their (e) — and stamp them and then they will be ready for travelling.

14. The history of pearls is very long. When human beings were looking for (a) — they first saw pearl at the seashore. Pearl is actually a highly (b) — gem. We also (c) — the name of pearls in different religious books and in (d) — mythologies. It was greatly (e) — with love, marriage, wealth and social status.

15. Nakshi Kantha is a kind of (a) — quilt. The name was from the Bengali word ‘Naksha’ which craft and is said to be (d) — pattern. It is a kind of (c) — to Bangladesh and means (d) — West Bengal in India. The art has been practised in (e) — Bengal for centuries. The name Nakshi Kantha became popular after the poet Jasimuddin’s poem Nakshi Kanthar Math was published in 1929.

16. Good food means the right kind of food for good health. It is nutritious. It must contain natural — that our body needs to grow properly (b) — stay healthy. But remember, you must not (c) — too much though the food is good. (d) — too much is bad for health. You (e) — to eat a certain amount of food that your body needs.

17. The Tha Kha floating market is more traditional with a few tourists visiting than other floating markets. Originally, the Tha Kha floating market used to sit only six or seven days a month (a) — on the phase of the moon. Nowadays, the trade takes place on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays too. The main buyers here are the Tha Kha (b) — People seem to know each other very well. Everyone was seen (c) — and calling each other by name. The locals did not (d) — Mita and others much. They were all (e) — buying and selling.

18. Bangladeshi cuisine is rich and varied with the use of many spices. We have (a) — and appetizing food, snacks and sweets. Boiled rice is our (b) — food. It is served with a (c) — of vegetables, curry, lentil soups, fish and meat. Fish is the main (d) — of protein. Fishes are now (e) — in ponds. Also we have fresh-water fishes in the lakes and rivers.

19. Folk songs are songs sung in the traditional style of a community or country. Here the traditional style (a) — the themes, words and tunes of the songs that have existed for a long time among the (b) — people. We have a (c) — history and collection of folk songs in Bangladesh. Of them Palligiti, Bhatiali. Bhawaiya, Jari, Sari, Gambhira, Lalongiti, Palagaan and songs of Hason Raja are very (d) —. The traditional musical instruments are usually (e) — with these songs.

20. Mita, Zara and her parents are at Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport. They are (a) — in the lounge. Mita is very (b) —. This is her (c) — time to board a plane. They are (d) — by Bangladesh Biman. Mita is hoping to have a (e) — time in Thailand.

21. The Greeks thought of pearls as a sign of wealth and social position. The beauty of pearls was (a) — with love and marriage. In ancient Rome, pearls were (b) — the greatest sign of (c) — and social status. At that time the young women of noble families loved to (d) — beautiful pearl necklaces. The brave knights used to wear them in the (e) — for good luck.

22. The Ama divers rely on their own skills and breathing techniques. They use that skill and (a) — to push themselves down to the (b) — of the sea and back to the surface again. They can (c) — their breath for up to two minutes. Careful watching, lung capacity and hunter (d) — are the special qualities of Ama divers. However, some of these young villagers are going to the city for other jobs. The remaining Ama divers are now (e) — between 50 and 60.

23. Scientists believe that Bangladesh will be worst affected by global climate change. The (a) — rain and drying out of rivers have made boat movement heavily restricted. Thirdly, many river gypsies are (b) — their lifestyle in the (c) — of changed reality. They are thinking of living permanently on land. The authority feels that river gypsies need help to (d) — in the mainstream population, Therefore, the government is offering voting rights, permanent (e) — and bank-loan facilities. However, changes do not come overnight.

24. It was Sunday. Mita, Zara, Jhuma Islam and Mazharul Islam (a) — up very early. They quickly got ready and started for Tha Kha floating market. They (b) — to have breakfast at the market. They reached the market (c) — sharp at 7. The canals were (d) — with coconut palm trees. They hired a boat. The boatman started to row slowly taking them to the (e) — of the market.

25. In some fishing villages along the coast of Japan, there are amazing groups of women known as ‘Ama divers’. These women worked and are still (a) — as Ama. The word ‘Ama’ means ‘women of the sea or sea women’. They are independent (b) —. They make their (c) — by diving. They can (d) — to the depth of the sea up to 25 metres. And they dive without (e) — oxygen tanks of other breathing equipment.

26. Thousands of years ago, the first pearl was probably discovered while human beings were searching for food at the seashore. Throughout history, the pearl with its (a) — has been one the most highly valued gems. Pearls have been (b) — many times in religious texts mythologies from the earliest times. The ancient Egyptians (c) — pearls so much that they were (d) — with them. It is said that the famous Queen of Egypt, Cleopatra would (e) — a pearl in glass and drink it as a sign of love and respect for the entire nation.

27. Fifteen-year old Shamima’s dreams were nipped in the bud. Her father wanted to (a) — her of against her will. Marrying off a girl under 18 is (b) — the law in Bangladesh. Shamima did not want to get (c) —. But nobody paid any heed to her. They (d) — her marriage with a man much older than her. All her tears and protests went in (e) —. Shamima was married off to Kamal Uddin Joardar.

28. They came upon a century-old rain tree. An owl had his (a) — in that tree. The dove and the bat (b) — at the owl’s door. The old grumpy owl opened the door. The dove and the bat requested him to give them (c) —. The owl (d) — let them in. The two birds were (e) — too. They begged for some food.

29. Once there were hardly any trees in this village. Kartik used to go to (a) — houses for his job. At times he would get (b) — in the scorching sun, but there were no trees under which he could (c) — and rest for a while. Thinking how people (d) — in the heat, Kartik (e) — his tree planting mission.

30. Throughout the monsoon, river gypsies remain busy with fishing. They also dive for natural (a) — in waters. Sometimes, they (b) — for a couple of weeks. Men catch snakes and (c) — people with snake charming and sell herbal cures. Women go from door to door to sell bangles cosmetics and other things. They also try to (d) — pains of old people often by sucking out blood from their body. Many villagers believe in the magical (e) — of the gypsies.

31. Although the wheel is a very (a) — invention, the history of its origin is unknown. Experts que what the first wheel was developed from a circular object. The early man observed that a huge pic of stone could be rolled easily if it was (b) — in shape. Similarly, a heavy tree-trunk is to (c) — carry: but it can be rolled away with less effort. Even, a gigantic tree-trunk can be moved easily using other small and round trunks as rollers under it. Thus, early man took advantage of rolling objects and developed the (d) — wheel. Apart from its mechanical advantage, a wheel’s mobility has contributed (e) — to the civilization.

32. Ladies and gentlemen, welcome on board Flight BG88 to Bangkok. We are currently third in line for (a) — and are (b) — to be in the air in approximately seven minutes. Please (c) — your seat belt and secure all baggage under your seat or in the overhead compartments. Keep your seats and table trays in upright position for take-off. Please (d) — off all personal electronic devices. including laptops and cellphones. This is a non-smoking flight. (e) — in the lavatory is prohibited. Thank you for choosing Bangladesh Biman. Enjoy your flight.

33. The ethnic people in Bangladesh (a) — a very important (b) —. They do (c) — in the culture of the country. cultivation. They speak their (d) — mother tongues. (e) — religion they are Hindus, Christians and Buddhists.

34. Sweets are (a) — among close relatives when there is good news (b) — births, weddings. promotions, etc. Sweets of Bangladesh are mostly milk (c) —. The common ones are roshgulla, sandesh, rasamali, gulap jamun, kalo jamun and chom-chom. There are hundreds of (d) — varieties of sweet preparations. Sweets are therefore an important (e) — of the day-to-day life of Bangladeshi people.

35. Though Shamima (a) — in an ordinary village, she is an (b) — woman. Her willpower and (c) — have made her extraordinary. She did not (d) — much happiness in her life but such kind of experience could not defeat her. She (e) — all her odds of life and became successful.

36. Gypsy children are born and (a) — up on roaming boats. Therefore, they cannot (b) — to conventional schools. And hence, mobile boat schools are (c) — up for gypsy children. Some (d) —organizations are running special schools on boats to (e) — river gypsy children in some areas.

37. The tribal people follow their (a) —. The platform they build their houses on is called (b) —. Men wear lungi. Women (c) — their own cloth. Their staple food is (d) —. They are fond of songs, dance, music and (e) —. Wrestling is their favourite sport.

38. In a typical village of Bangladesh named Tarapur, there lives an age-old man. He has a great (a) — to plant saplings which once (b) — into gigantic trees. He has never forgotten what his father (c) — him to remember. Once there will hardly be any tree in this (d) —. So, he began his (e) — mission there.

39. Once there were (a) — any trees in this village. Kartik (b) — to go to different houses for his fob. At times he would get (c) — in the scorching sun, but there were no trees (d) — which he could sit and rest for a while. Thinking how people suffer in the (e) — Kartik began his tree planting mission.

40. The old (a) — owl opened the door. The dove and the bat (b) — him to give them shelter. The Owl unwillingly (c) — them in. The two birds were hungry too. They (d) — for some food. The selfish owl was not happy. However, he shared his (e) — with them. The dove was so tired that she could hardly eat.

41. Kartik Poramanik is a (a) — hair dresser in a village (b) — Tarapur. He is a lover of nature. To save people (c) — the heat of the scorching sun, he started planting trees at the age of ten. He has (d) — hundreds of trees beside the roads, in and (e) — the bazar, schools and many other places.

42.  The ancient Egyptians (a) — pearls so much that they were buried with (b) —. Its said that the (c) — queen of Egypt, Cleopatra would dissolve a (d) — in a glass and drink it as a sign of love and respect for the (e) — nation.

Filling gaps without clues

Gap Filling Without Clue

Fill in each gap using appropriate word

1. (D. B. 2019) We all know what a dream is. Generally we dream during our sleep. Some dreams are sweet or (a) —. When we dream something extremely bad, we call it a (b) — Dreams have no (c) — They are soft and (d) —. The dream we have during the day time is called (e) —, Dreams have fascinated philosophers for thousands of years, but none could (f) — specifically what dream actually is. Dreams can be extraordinarily (g) — or very vague. While many theories have been proposed no consensus has emerged. It is important to consider that science is still (h) — the exact purpose and function of sleep itself. Some researchers suggest that dreams have no (i) — purpose, while others believe that (j) — is essential to mental, emotional and physical well-being.

Answer: (a) romantic/pleasant (b) nightmare (c) colour (d) silvery (e) day-dream (f) define/say (g) vivid (h) unraveling (i) real (j) dreaming

2. [C. B. 2019] In recent years there have been many alarming reports that world’s climate is undergoing a significant change. All these reports provide (a) — evidence (b) — world’s temperatures are increasing day by day. This increase in global (c) — is caused (d) — increased amounts of carbon dioxide (e) — the earth. Most climatologists (f) — that greenhouse effect is the likely (g) — of this global warming. It may harm human (h) — seriously. This could catastrophically (i) — mankind’s (j) —  to grow food.

Answer: (a) strong (b) that (c) warming (d) by (e) around (f) believe/predict (g) cause (h) beings (i) reduce (j) ability

3. (R. B. 2019) The persona of a traffic policeman has always been a (a) — one. It has often found (b) — space and close treatment in literature and other (c) —. Besides the many poems about this (d) — character, there is at least one (e) — where the central character is a traffic policeman. In 1963, Greek film maker Filippos Fylaktas made this film (f) — My Brother, the Traffic policeman. It featured a slightly (g) — traffic police, Antonis Pikrocholos who is utterly (h) — to service and duty and applies the traffic (i) — with unyielding (j) —.

Answer: (a) curious (b) important (c) arts (d) fascinating (e) movie (f) named (g) manic (h) devoted (i) code (j) severity

4. (J. B. 2019) There goes a proverb that child is (a) — of the man. Today’s child is the (b) — of a nation. He will (c) — the country. The whole (d) — depends on their proper (e) —. It is our fundamental (f) —  to rouse their (g) — talent. A sound environment is (h) — both in the family and the society so that a child (i) — up physically, mentally and spiritually. Only then it will be (j) — to build up a beautiful and developed country.

Answer: (a) father (b) future (c) lead (d) country (e) development (f) duty/resonsibi1ity (g) hidden/latent (h) required (i) grow (j) possible

5. [S. B. 2019] We know that all species are (a) — for maintaining ecological balance. If one is (b) —, the whole natural environment (c) —. In order to (d) — the environment from being spoilt, we should therefore protect (e) — wildlife. The good news is that many countries are now (f) — action to protect their (g) — wildlife. We should (h) — the earth’s wild (i) — to save ourselves. To be (j) — to animals is to be kind to mankind.

Answer: (a) important (b) gone (c) suffers (d) protect (e) our/the (f) taking (g) vulnerable (h) protect/save (i) lives/ creatures/animals (j) kind

6. (B. B. 2019) In Britain road and transport rules are (a) — followed by the drivers. Consequently it has the best road (b) — record in Europe. All transports must strictly (c) — by the rules (d) —by the government. Coaches and minibuses (e) — carry children under 16 must be (f) — with seatbelts. There the law (g) — agencies are (h) —. So, the buses and coaches have become the (i) — form of road (j) —.

Answer: (a) strictly/duly (b) safety (c) abide (d) prescribed/set (e) that (I) equipped/furnished (g) enforcing (h) strict (i) symbolic (j) road

7. (Ctg. B. 2019) Adolescents (a) — on their (b) —, their communities, schools, health services and their workplaces to (c) — a wide range of skills that can (d) — them to cope with the (e) — they face and make a successful transition from (f) — to adulthood. Parents, members (g) — the community, service providers, and (h) — institutions have the (i) — to both promote adolescent development and adjustment and to intervene (j) — when problems arise.

Answer: (a) depend (b) families (c) learn (d) help/assist (e) pressures/problems (f) childhood (g) of (h) social (i) responsibility (j) effectively

8. (Dnj. B. 2019) Diaspora is an age-old (a) —. In recent times, Rohingya (b) — has attracted a lot of attention. More than one million Rohingyas have (c) — from Myanmar to Bangladesh. Their migration is (d) — to the adverse conditions in Rakhine State of Myanmar–the ancestral homeland of the Rohingyas. The government of Bangladesh has (e) — this huge number of refugees on humanitarian (f) —. But these people are a huge (g) — on our economy and on our (h) —. The world community should extend their full support to the (i) — Rohingyas so that they can (j) — return to their homeland.

Answer: (a) issue/matter/phenomenon (b) diaspora (c) fled/come/ migrated (d) due (e) accepted (f) ground (g) burden (h) environment (i) migrated (j) safely/easily

9. [HSC Exam (Ka Set) 2018] In our country, women are the worst sufferers in every stage of life. Social prejudices and customs tend to (a) — their position. When a female child is born. it is not regarded (b) — a happy event. She is not welcomed with the deep (c) — of heart. Instead of being delighted, most of the members of the family think that she has come to add to their (d) —. Even the mother of the female child is not welcomed cordially for giving (e) — to a female child. Rather the mother of the female child is (f) — for this. In the most cases, women are the victim of gender (g) —. In fact the life of our women is not smooth (h) — If we want lasting development of the country, we have to (i) — the dignified status of (j) — women of our country. The government is conscious of this matter.

Answer: (a) degrade (b) as (c) feeling  (d) suffering  (e) birth (f) condemned  (g) discrimination (h) at all /  (i) ensure  (j) all / the

10. [HSC Exam. (Kha Set) 2018] Dream is a series of thoughts, images and sensations occurring in a person’s mind during sleep. Dream is a (a) — of unconscious wishes, thoughts and imaginations. It (b) — be sweet or horrible. When we dream (c) — pleasant, we call it a sweet dream. (d) — when we dream something extremely bad, we (e) — it a nightmare. Dream is meaningless if (f) — is a day dream. But dream has also (g) — real purpose as it is related to our (h) —, emotional and physical well-being. The main benefit (i) — dream is that it produces new thoughts (j) — ideas in brain and helps to clean up clutter from mind.

Answer: (a) representation (b) can/may (c) something (d) but (e) call (f) it (g) a (h) mental (i) of (j) and

11. [Dhaka Board-2017] Rabindranath Tagore was a man of (a) — genius. He was (b) — a poet and a novelist (c) — a playwright, a composer, a painter and a philosopher. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for (d) — ‘Gitanjali’ into English. Those translations earned him a great (e) — in the West. As a humanist, Tagore accused the British (f) — and pleaded for the (g) — of India from Britain, Tagore was highly influential in (h) — the best of Indian culture to the West and Vice-versa. He (i) — himself to literature at a very early age. After coming back from England, he began to write (i) — in all branches of literature.

Answer: (a) Versatile (b) not only (c) but also (d) translating (e) popularity/ name (f) rulers (g) freedom (h) transporting (i) turned/attached (j) profusely/copiously

12. [Comilla Board-2017] Bangladesh is a land of (a) — beauty. Its beauty is so captivating that a stranger cannot but be (b) — looking at this endless variety. Nature has (c) — showered its blessings on this country. The rivers, hills and forests are rich in natural (d) —. The people of this country feel a strong (e) — for their motherland. They love their motherland from the (f) — of heart. They work hard to (g) — its economic condition and to remove poverty. Most of them toil hard from dawn to dusk to accelerate the pace of (h) —. The progress of this country lies in the (i) — of common people. They are the (j) — of a beautiful and prosperous Bangladesh.

Answer: (a) natural (b) overwhelmed (c) generously (d) beauty (e) love/attraction (f) core (g) develop (h) development (i) hands (j) makers

13. The long and wide beach at Kuakata has a (a) — natural setting. This sandy beach slopes b) — into the Bay of Bengal and bathing there as (c) — as is swimming or diving. Kuakata is truly a (d) — beach and a (e) — for migratory winter birds. Fishing boats (f) — in the Bay of Bengal with colourful (g) — surfing waves and the lines of coconut trees add to the (h) — colours of Kuakata. The (i) — culture of the Rakhaine community and hundred year old Buddhist temple indicate the age-old tradition and cultural (j) — of this area.

Answers : (a) unique (b) gently (c) pleasant (d) virgin (e) sanctuary (1) plying (g) sails (h) vibrant (i) indigenous (j) heritage.

14. A peace movement is a social movement that (a) — to achieve ideals such as the (b) — of a particular war (or all wars), minimize inter-human violence in a particular (c) — or type of situation, including ban of guns, and is often linked to the (d) — of achieving world peace. Means to achieve these (e) — includes advocacy of (f) — nonviolent resistance, diplomacy, boycotts, demonstrations, (g) – camps, supporting anti-war political (h) — and banning guns, creating (i) — government, direct democracy, supporting people who (j) — warcrimes or conspiracies to create wars, and making laws. Answers : (a) tends (b) ending (c) place/area (d) goals (e) include (f) pacifism (g) peace (h) candidate (i) open (j) wage.

15. The Sundarbans is known for vanishing (a) — but the scientists said the current (b) — of the mangrove forests on the southern coastline in not normal. “The causes for increasing coastline retreat, other than direct anthropogenic ones, include increased frequency of (c) — surges and other extreme (d) — events, rises in (e) and increased salinity which increases the (f) — of mangroves’, said Pettorelli.” Our results indicate a rapidly retreating (g) — that cannot be accounted for by the (h) — dynamics of the Sundarbans. Degradation is happening (i) — weakening this natural (j) — for India and Bangladesh.

Answers : (a) Islands (b) retreat (c) storm (d) natural (e) sea (f) vulnerability (g) coastline (h) regular (i) fast (j) shield

16. Dreams have fascinated philosophers for thousands of years but only (a) — have dreams been subjected to (b) research and scientific study. Chances are that we often find ourselves puzzling over the (c) — of a dream or perhaps we (d) — why we dream at all. A dream can (e) — any of the images, thoughts and (f)—that are experienced during sleep. Dreams can be extraordinarily (g) or very (h) filled with joyful emotions or (i) — emotions, focused and understandable or unclear and (j) —.

Answers : (a) recently (b) empirical (c) content (d) wonder (e) include (f) emotions (g) vivid (h) vague (i) frightening (1) confusing.

17. Orpheus was presented by his father with a (a) — and taught to play upon it which he did to such (b) — that nothing could (c) — the charm of his music. Not only his (d) —but wild animals also were (e) — by his music. The very trees and rocks were (f) — by him. The former (g) — around him and the latter (h) — somewhat of their (i) — softened by his (j) —.

Answers : (a) lyre (6) perfection (c) withstand (d) fellow-mortals (e) softened (f) charmed (g) crowded gathered (h) relaxed (1) hardness () notes/music.

18. The term ‘Diaspora’ is used to (a) — to people who have left their homelands and (b) — in other parts of the world, either because they were (c) — to do so or (d) — they wanted to leave on their (e) —. The word is increasingly (f) — Sundarbans for such people as a (g) — group and/or a community. The world has seen many (h) — but scholars have been studying the (i) — with great interest only in (j) — decades.

Answers : (a) refer (b) settled (c) forced (d) because (e) own (f) used (9) collective (h) diasporas (i) phenomenon (j) recent.

19. Among the great diasporas of history is that of the (a) — people, who were forced to (b) — their lands in ancient times. The (c) — of Aryans from Central Europe to the Indian Subcontinent thousands of years ago is also a (d) — Diaspora, although the causes of this diaspora are (e) —. In the twentieth century history, the (f) — Diaspora has attracted a lot of attention and been a cause of (g) — for world leaders because of the (h) — of Palestinians. There have been (i) — diasporas in Africa, too, over the centuries, either because of war or because of the (j) — of nature. But the chief reason why the phenomenon of diaspora is attracting so much attention now is globalization.

Answers : (a) Jewish (b) leave (c) movement (d) noteworthy (e) unclear (f) Palestinian (g) concern (h) plight (i) massive (j) ravages.

20. Migration from Bangladesh to Britain (a) — in 1930s and was predominantly a Sylheti (b) — Men of this particular geographical area (c) — by the British ship companies first started the (d) — of migration. These men were (e) — illiterate and belonged to the landless (f) After the World War II, due to labour (g) — British government encouraged labour migration from its (h) — colonies. The post-war British economy demanded (i) — and plentiful labour, much of which was (j) — from South Asia.

Answers : (a) started (b) phenomenon (c) employed (d) process (e) largely (f) peasant (g) shortage (h) former (i) cheap 6) recruited.

21. In Brick Lane area street signs are not just in English but also in (a) —. And the lamp posts are in green and red resembling the (b) — of the Bangladeshi flag. In fact, everywhere one may (c) the visual cues of the Bangladeshi, and even more specially, the Sylheti (d) — in the area. Storefronts (e) — flights from London to Sylhet, some on Bangladesh Biman the national airline in Bangladesh and others on Air Sylhet, a private airline company (f) — by British Bangladeshis. There is a (g) — of Sonali Bank, the major (h) — commercial Bank of Bangladesh. There is a food store (i) — frozen fish from Sylhet’s Surma (j) —.

Answers : (a) Bengali (b) colour (c) see (d) presence (e) advertise (f) formed (g) sign (h) state-own (i) advertising (j) river.

22. Mandela was among the first to (a) — armed resistance to apartheid, going (b) — in 1961 to form the ANC’s armed wing. He left South Africa and (c) — the continent and Europe, studying guerrilla (d) — and building support for the ANC. Branded a (e) — by his enemies, Mandela was (f) — to life imprisonment in 1964, isolated from millions of his countrymen as they suffered (g) —, violence and forced resettlement under the (h) — regime of racial segregation. He was (i) — on Robben Island, a penal colony of Cape Town, where he would spend the next 18 years before being moved to mainland (j) —.

23. The history of Bengal is the history of a people who have (a) — made their highways (b) — with their blood. We shed blood in 1952; even though we were the (c) — in the elections of 1954 we could not (d) — a government then. In 1958 Ayub Khan (e) — Martial Law to (f) — us for the next ten years. In 1966 when we (e) — the six point movement our boys were shot dead on 7 June. When after the (h) — of 1969 Ayub Khan fell from power and Yahya Khan (i) — the reins of the government he declared that he would give us a (j) — and restore democracy; we listened to him then. A lot has happened since and elections have taken place.

24. I am in a tiny steel cage (a) — to a motorcycle, (b) — through traffic in Dhaka, Bangladesh. In the last ten minutes, we have (c) — forward maybe three feet, inch by inch, the driver (d) — the wheel left and right, (e) — deeper into the wedge between a delivery truck and a rickshaw in front of us. Up ahead, the traffic is jammed so close together that (f) — are climbing aver pickup trucks and through (g) — rickshaws to cross the street. Two rows to my left is an ambulance, blue light (h) — uselessly. This is what the streets here look like from seven o’clock in the morning until ten o’clock at night. If you’re rich, you (i) — it from the back seat of a car. If you’re poor, you’re in a rickshaw, breathing in the (j) —.

25. The obvious solution is to (a) — the rickshaws from the cars, from the CNGs, give each of them lanes and lights according to their top (b) — and, crucially, make car (c) — pay the cost of taking up more space on the roads. But that, politically (d) is unrealistic. Car owners are a small part of the (e) —, but they are the most (f) —. Every year, Dhaka adds an extra 37,000 cars to its already (g) — roads. Think about all this from a Bangladeshi politician’s (h) — of view. Any attempt to solve the traffic (i) — means (j) — the poor, the middle class, and the rich all at once.

26. The tests (a) — that poultry feed in the country had also been (b) —, as samples of chicken and fish contained (c) — of antibiotics. High (d) — populations were found in (e) — samples of pasteurised milk, indicating poor (f) — procedures by the manufacturers. Samples of cucumber and street foods also (g) — high microbial populations, (h) — widespread contamination in the water supply. The Director of Institute of Public Health (IPH), told the Dhaka Tribune that the survey report has been (i) — to the Health Ministry. Further tests of different products were being (j) — out at the Food Safety Lab.

27. It was twenty years ago and I was (a) — in Paris. I had a tiny apartment in the Latin Quarter (b) — a cemetery, and I was earning (c) — enough money to keep body and soul together. She had read a book of mine and had (d) — to me about it. I answered, (e) — her, and presently I received from her another letter saying that she was (f) — through Paris and would like to have a (g) — with me; but her time was limited, and the only free moment she had was on the (h) — Thursday, she was spending the morning at the Luxembourg and would give her a (i) — luncheon at Foyot’s afterwards? Foyot’s is a restaurant at which the French senators eat, and it was so far (j) — my means that I had never even thought of going there.

28. Adolescents are (a) — both from young children and adults. Specifically, adolescents are not fully (b) —of understanding complex concepts, or the relationship between behaviour and (c) — or the degree of control they have or can have over health decision-making, (d) — that related to sexual behaviour. This (e) — may make them particularly (f) — to sexual exploitation and high-risk behaviours. Laws, customs, and practices may also (g) — adolescents differently than adults. For example, laws and policies often restrict adolescents’ (h) — to reproductive health information and services, especially when they are (i) —. In addition, even when services do exist, provider attitudes about adolescents often pose a (j) — barrier to the use of those services.

29. Adolescents (a) — on their families, their communities, schools, health services and their (b) — to learn a wide range of (c) — that can help them to (d) — with the pressures they face and make a successful (e) — from childhood to (f) —. Parents, members of the (g) — service providers, and social (h) — have the responsibility to both (i) — adolescent development and adjustment and to (j) —effectively when problems arise.

30. Shilpi’s mother-in-law and neighbours continued to (a) — the newlyweds. Deeply rooted cultural practices and (b) — caused a rift between Shilpi and Rashid and their (c) — family, some of whose members insulted and (d) — the couple. Unable to (e) — their close relatives of the risks, Shilpi and Rashid returned to the counsellor. They took the help of a parent (f) — who has been trained to speak to other parents about adolescent issues. Shilpi’s mother-in-law and neighbours (g) — came to understand the harmful effects of early (h) — on mother and child. Today, the village no longer pressurizes the (i) — their parents and neighbours now support them and speak out against (j) — marriage and pregnancy.

31. In 2008, 9-year old Katie Stagliano (a) — a tiny cabbage seedling home from school. As she (b) — for her cabbage, it grew to 40 pounds. Katie (c) — her cabbage to a soup kitchen where it helped to (d) —more than 275 people. Moved by the (e) — of seeing how many people could (f) — from the donation of fresh produce to soup kitchens, Katie (g) — to start vegetable gardens and donate the (h) — to help feed people in need. Today, Katie’s Krops donates thousands of pounds of (i) — produce from numerous gardens to organizations that help people in (j) —.

32. Anne Frank is perhaps the most well-known (a) — of the Nazi Holocaust of World War II. Anne, born 1 on 12 June 1929, was given a diary at the age of 13, in which she (b) — her life from 1942 to 1944. During this time, Anne spent two years in (c) — with her family in Nazi-occupied Amsterdam in a (d) — annex with four other Jews. Betrayed and (e) — in 1944, Anne was sent to the BergenBelsen (f) —  camp, where she died of typhus in 1945. Anne’s father, Otto Frank, was the only (g) — of the secret annex to survive the war. In 1947, he (h) — Anne’s diary as The Diary of a Young Girl. Anne’s account of her internment, as well as her deep belief in (i) — has become one of the world’s most (j) — read books.

33. Accessibility to higher education (a) — that students get the opportunity to get university education and (b) — support from educational institutions. Increasing (c) — at the secondary and higher secondary level puts (d) — on higher educational institutions. But due to (e) — capacity, only a small number of students may be enrolled in universities. Thus, each year a large number of students are (f) — access to higher education. Also, due to poverty and (g) — in educational expenses, students of the lower middle class do not get easy (h) — to higher education. Moreover, those who get places in the universities have limited access to (i) — all kinds of diversified educational facilities (j) — to their study fields.

34. Everyone has the right to a (a) — of living adequate for the health and well-being of oneself and of one’s family, (b) — food, clothing, housing and (c) — care and necessary social services, and the (d) — to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of (e) — in circumstances (f) — one’s control. Motherhood and childhood are (g) — to special care and (h) —. All children, whether born in or out of wedlock, shall (i) — the same social (j) —.

35. One of the (a) — of water in our country are the rivers. Rivers are everywhere in our life, literature, and culture. But are the rivers in good (c) —? Unfortunately, they are not. A few are already dead and several are going through the (d) — of death. The river Buriganga is an example of a (e) — river. A report (f) — in the Daily Sun describes what has (g) — to the river Buriganga and why. It’s water is (h) — and a perpetual (i) — fills the air around it. But that is not what it was like (j) —.

36. The city paid back the (a) — of the river by sucking life out of it! According to newspaper report, the Buriganga is (b) — because of pollution. Huge quantities of toxic chemicals and wastes from mills and factories, hospitals and clinics and households and other (c) — are dumped into the river every day. The city of Dhaka (d) — about 4500 tons of solid waste every day and most of it is directly (e) — into the Buriganga. According to the Department of the Environment (DoE), 20,000 tons of tannery waste, (f) — some highly toxic materials, are (g) — into the river every day. Experts (h) — nine industrial areas in and (i) — the capital city as the primary sources of river (j) —.

37. Bangladesh is (a) — with huge inland open water resources. It has (b) — river canals, beels, lakes, and vast areas of (c) —. Hakaluki haor is one of the major (d) — of Bangladesh. With a land area of 18,386 hectares, it supports a rich (e) — and provides direct and indirect (f) — benefits to nearly 190,000 people. This haor was (g) — an Ecologically Critical Area in April 1999 by the government of Bangladesh. Hakaluki is a (h) — ecosystem, containing more than 238 (i) — beels and jalmahals. The most (j) — beels are Chatla, Pinlarkona, Dulla, Sakua, Barajalla, Balijhuri, Lamba, Tekonia, Haorkhal, Tural, Baghalkuri and Chinaura.

38. Hakaluki Haor is an important source of (a) — resources for Bangladesh. Kalibaus, Boal, Rui, Ghagot, Pabda and Chapila are the main fish (b) — found here. From the Kushiara there are (c) — upstream movement of fish towards the beels and (d) — of Hakaluki. The beels in Hakaluki haor provide winter (e) — for the mother fisheries. In early (f) — these mother fisheries produce millions of fries for the entire downstream fishing (g) —. Floodplains are also an important source of fisheries resources within the area. However, many of the beels have lost their capacity to provide shelter for mother fisheries because of sand (h) — from upstream rivers and canals, use of complete (i) — technique for fishing and lack of aquatic plants to provide feed and shelter for (j) — fish.

39. The researchers used various climate-change models to (a) — the future for three bamboo species relied on by pandas in the Qinling Mountain region of China, which (b) — about a quarter of the total remaining panda habitat. These models (c) — in their specific predictions, but each (d) — some level of temperature rise within the coming century. The results (e) — that if the bamboo is restricted to its current distribution area, between 80 and 100 percent of it will (f) — by the end of the 21st century, because it won’t be able to grow under the increased temperatures. If, however, bamboo can move into new, (g) — areas (which will reach the same temperatures as current bamboo habitats due to warming), then there is hope. However, all depend on the (h) — to which humans can (i) — climate change by limiting greenhouse-gas (j) — in the future.

40. A (a) — mangrove forest shared by Bangladesh and India that is home to (b) — 500 Bengal tigers is being rapidly (c) — by erosion, rising sea levels and storm surges, (d) — to a major study by researchers at the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and others. The Sundarbans forest took the (e) — of super cyclone Sidr in 2007, but new (f) — studies show that 71% of the forested coastline is (g) — by as much as 200 metres a year. If (h) — continues at this pace, already (i) — tiger populations living in the forests will be put (j) — at risk.

41. Kuakata is one of the (a) — spots which allow a visitor to watch both the sunrise and the (b) — from the beach. That perhaps makes Kuakata one of the world’s most (c) — beaches. The long and wide beach at Kuakata has a (d) — natural setting. This sandy beach (e) — gently into the Bay and bathing there is as pleasant as is (f) — or diving. Kuakata is truly a (g) — beach and a sanctuary for migratory winter birds. Fishing boats plying in the Bay of Bengal with (h) — sails, surfing waves and the lines of coconut trees add to the (i) — colours Kuakata. The indigenous culture of the Rakhaine community and hundred year old Buddhist temples indicate the age-old tradition and cultural (j) — of this area.

42. Kuakata is truly a (a) — beach and it is (b) — as a sanctuary for the (c) — winter birds. Fishing boats (d) — in the Bay of Bengal with colorful sails. The lines of coconut tree contribute to (e) — the beauty of Kuakata. The (f) — culture of the Rakhaine community indicates the (g) — old tradition and cultural (h) — of this area. Kuakata is also (i) — a remarkable place for the Hindus and the Buddhists. Each year the place is (j) — by thousands of devotees.

43. Hercules was the son of Jupiter and Alcmena. Eurystheus, the King of Mycenae and his cousin, made him (a) — some difficult tasks, which are known in Greek myths as the ‘twelve (b) — of Hercules’. The first (c) — La fight with a lion. The valley of Nemea was being (d) — by a terrible lion and so Eurystheus ordered Hercules to slay the beast and bring him his (e) —. At first, Hercules tried to fight the lion with his club and (f) — but this took him nowhere. Then Hercules attempted a (g) — tactic: he decided he would use his hands. He thus (h) — to slay the animal on his own, relying entirely on his (i) — strength. Victorious, he returned to Mycenae carrying the dead lion on his shoulders, a sight that (j)  — the King.

44. Conflict can be (a) — in many ways but one of the simplest is that it pertains to the (b) — ideas and actions of different entities, resulting in an (c) — state. Conflict is an (d) — part of life. All of us possess our own opinions, ideas and sets of (e) —. We have our own ways of looking at things and we act according to what we (f) — is proper. Hence, we often find ourselves in conflict in different (g) —; it may involve other (h) — groups of people, or a struggle within our own selves. Consequently, conflict (i) — our actions and decisions in one way or (j) —.

45. An old man with steel (a) — spectacles and very (b) — clothes sat by the side of the road. There was a pontoon bridge (c) — the river and carts, trucks, and men, women and children were (d) — it. The mule-drawn carts (e) — up the steep bank from the bridge with soldiers helping (f) — against the spokes of the wheels. The trucks ground up and away (g) — out of it all and the peasants (h) — along in the ankle deep dust. But the old man (i) — there without moving. He was too (j) — to go any farther.

46. We human beings tend to (a) — how far we have come as a species in a (b) — short period of time. It was only in the 1870s when we had the first house that was lighted with (c) —. Cars just started to become available 100 years ago. Charles Lindbergh made the first trans-Atlantic flight in 1927. Televisions didn’t become (d) — available until after World War II. In other words, the advances (e) —has made in a relatively short period of time have been nothing short of (f) —. Perhaps just as extraordinary is how we tend to simply adapt to these (g) — changes, not realising how completely our world has been altered in a short (h) — of time. With that in mind, it is worth looking back at some of the amazing (i) — advances we have made in the last few (j) —.

47. Global technology has been an integral part of our quest to (a) — leprosy. The rapid diagnostic test for leprosy (b) —, for example, was developed in (c) — with a Brazilian company. This company combined IDRI’s leprosy (d) — antigens with a smart phone-based platform that standardizes the (e) — to accurately interpret results and get a (f) — value. The test requires just a single drop of blood, mixed with a (g) — reagent. The appearance of two lines (h) — that the person is positive for leprosy. From there, the (i) —  from the phone is pushed to the person’s medical (j) —.

48. Cancer is one of the (a) — diseases of the modern era. Ever since the days of Hippocrates people have been searching for a (b) —. Cancer is similar to the common (c) — in that although there are many ways to (d) — it, modern medicine is still yet to come up with a cure. This is (e) — because like the common cold, there are many (f) — types of cancer, and they are all (g) — different. Unfortunately, with over seven million deaths per year, cancer is much more (h) — than the common cold. A wide (i) — of drugs, chemicals, stem cells, genetically modified viruses, and even arsenic have all been (j) — as cancer cures.

49. A craftwork is an applied form of art, a social and (a) —. product reflecting the inclusive nature of folk (b) —. A craftwork, which usually doesn’t bear the (c) — of its maker, retains a personal touch. When we look at a thirty year old nakshikantha we wonder at its (d) — and designs that point to the artistic (e) — and the presence of the maker in it. The fact that we don’t know her name or any other (f) — about her doesn’t take anything away from our (g) — of the artist. Indeed, the (h) — nature of the kantha and the tactile feeling it (i) — animate the work and make it very (j) —.

50. Good manners do not (a) — us anything, but what they bring (b) — in return is beyond measure. To be polite and gentle (c) — others one does not have to (d) — money, but the love and honour that such manners bring us cannot (e) — bought in a market. Good manners are often a matter (f) — habit. They are (g) — habit formed through training (h) — tradition. But (i) — reality such manners are also a matter of principle. For it is out of consideration and respect for others (j) — good manners are born.

51. A six-year old boy named Ryan Hreljac was (a) — to know that the African children had to walk many kilometers everyday just to (b) — water. Ryan decided to make a (c) — in Africa. By doing (d) — chores and (e) — speaking on clean water issue. Ryan (f) — enough money. He built his first (g) — with that money in a northern (h) — village. His (i) — led to Ryan’s Well Foundation, which worked to bring (j) — to clean water and sanitation.

52. Today’s women (a) — important role in all spheres of life. They (b) — no longer within the four walls of their home. They have (c) — out of their kitchens and are (d) — with men in all the development programmes of the government. Many women have (e) — higher education and are (f) — as doctors, engineers, teachers, administrators, judges, etc. They have been able to (g) — their worth. However, women still face (h) — discrimination. Many girls are married of at an (i) — age. Many never can have the (j) — to go to school.

53. Folk music (a) — of songs and music of a community that are (b) — by any sophisticated musical rules or any standard music styles. Bangladesh has a heritage of rich folk music (c) — includes both religious and (d) — songs. Folk music can be described as that type of ancient music which (e) — from the heart or a community; based on their natural style of (f) — uninfluenced by the rules of classical music and modern popular songs. Any mode or form (g) — by the combination of tune, voice and dance may (h) — described as music. Thus, the (i) — of folk song, folk dance and folk tune is called folk music. For (j) —, Baul songs are a combination of tune, music and dance.

54. Introverts and extroverts (a) — two kinds of men (b) — in the society.An introvert is quite(c) — to an extrovert. Without (d) — extrovert no man or woman can (e) — life in the country. What we have (f) — from the (g) —of Sohel and Farid gives us the quality of introvert. (h) — Farid has done in the bus (i) — introvert. Fahima is (j) — the extrovert quality.

55. Television has become a (a) — source of entertainment of the present world. A wide (b)—of programmes is (c) — on numerous channels. Almost every family has a television (d) — today. Television (e) — are not only entertaining, they can be highly (f) — too. For example, television is now (g) — used for distance learning. The courses (h) — by the open university are shown on BTV. Several chanels like the Discovery Channels and the National Geographic Chanel telecast highly informative and (i) — programmes. However, watching TV (j) — is not permissible.

 

 

3. [DHAKA BOARD — 2013] UNICEF (a) — originally for the United Nations  International Children’s Emergency Fund. But now it is the United Nations Children’s Fund which (b) — long-term help to children of developing nations. It (c) — several welfare projects in Bangladesh. It has established numerous maternity and baby care centres around the country to (d) — the health of babies and child-bearing mothers. It has helped Bangladesh get rid of (e) — childhood diseases. It has (f) — training programmes to create rural health workers. Thus, this organisation has been able to (g) — infant mortality rates in Bangladesh. Above all, in times of natural disasters, it undertakes (h) — work to help the distressed people. To (i) — education, UNICEF distributes reading and writing materials among students, trains teachers and (j) — primary education particularly among girls.

4. [DINAJPUR BOARD — 2013, SYLHET BOARD-2011] Jerry, an (a) — of twelve lived in the orphanage. The writer hired a cabin (b) — to the orphanage. Jerry came to the cabin to (c) — wood for the writer. He also (d) — some extra work for the (e) — of the writer. Once he (f) _____a cubby-hole where he (g) — some kindling and medium wood (h) — that the writer might (i) — dry fire materials ready in (j) — of sudden wet weather materials ready in (j) — of sudden wet weather.

5. [JESSORE BOARD—2013, JESSORE BOARD-2008] Introverts and extroverts are two (a) — of people (b) — in society. An (c) — is quite opposite to an extrovert. Without (d) — extrovert no one can (e) — life in the country. What we have (f) — from the (g) — of Sohel and Farid gives us the quality of (h) — . What Farid has done in the bus (i) — introvert. Fahima is (j) — the extrovert quality.

6. [COMILLA BOARD — 2013, SYLHET BOARD-2006] Air and water are two important (a) — of the environment. These elements are (b) — for life on earth.  They are often (c) — in many ways. Air is polluted by (d) — If we want to live a (f) — life, and water by different kinds of (e) — and filth. We should (g) — the pollution of the environment. Total prevention may be (h) — but we can certainly (i) — pollution by raising (j) — among the people.

7. [SYLHET BOARD—2013, COMILLA BOARD-2011] Banks are often unable or (a) — to lend money to the poorer section of society. The Grameen Bank (b) — credit to the poor, particularly rural (c) — .There are about 800 micro finance (d) — in our country. It is estimated that they have (e) — employment opportunities for about 54,000 people. A recent (i) — indicates that micro-credit programmes had a (g) — effect on socio-economic variables (h) — children’s schooling, nutrition and family (i) — and about 5% of programme participants rose above (j) — line.

8. [RAJSHAHI BOARD — 2013, DHAKA BOARD-2011, BARISAL BOARD-2009, COMILLA BOARD-2007] Sports are a popular form of (a) — . Many international (b) — events are organised from time to time. Most of those events are (c) — by multinational manufacturing companies and business firms. They (d) — for the sports events in exchange for the right to (e) — their products during those events. These events are (f) — worldwide by satellite and people all (g) — the world watch them (h) —. As a result, the sponsors’ products receive maximum media (i) — thus giving companies international (j) —.

9. [BARISAL BOARD — 2013, BARISAL BOARD-2011] E-mail has brought about (a) — in modern (b) — . Messages can be transmitted from one country to another within a few (c) — . It is far cheaper than telephone calls. Trade and commerce has become greatly (d) — on this speedy mode of communication. It has (e) — not reached everyone, specially in (f) — countries like ours, as most of the people cannot (g) — to have a personal computer. But (h) — of the people have started (i) — commercially operated e-mail for important (j) —.

10. [CHITTAGONG BOARD—2013, BARISAL BOARD-2007] Bangladesh is a land of (a) —. But nowadays the rivers are (b) — up. So, (c) — is an urgent necessity for our country now. The rivers carry (d) — which makes the land (e) — to grow crops. Besides, they supply us with plenty of (f) — . During the dry season, we (g)–river water to the land. At present, the (h) — of water causes bad harvest. We can easily (i) — the use and utility of the rivers in our life and (j) — .

11. [DHAKA BOARD-2012] All things that make up the environment are (a) — . The way in which people, animals and plants are related to each other and to their (b) — is known as (c) — . The ecosystem is a (d) — web that links animals, plants and every other life (e) — in the biosphere. All these things (f) — together. The system is in a steady state of (g) — balance which means that by (h) — any one part of the web you can affect all the other parts. For example, the (i) — of forests may have serious ecological (j) — on humans and animals.

12. [RAJSHAHI BOARD-2012, RAJSHAHI BOARD-2008, BARISAL BOARD-2008, JESSORE BOARD–2003] Man pollutes water, another vital (a) — of the environment by  (b) — waste into  it. Farmers (c) — chemical fertilizers and insecticides in their fields. Some of these chemicals, washed away by rain and flood, (d) — mixed with water in rivers, canals and ponds. Water is also (e) — by mills and factories when they throw their (f) — chemicals and waste products into rivers and canals. Water vehicles also pollute rivers by dumping oil, food waste and human (g) — into them. In sanitary latrines (h) — on river and canal banks are also (i) — for further pollution. In this way, various (j) — of waste and filth contaminate water.

13. [JESSORE BOARD-2012] UNICEF is an international (a) — . It runs several welfare (b) — in Bangladesh. It has reduced infant (c) — rates through raising (d) — about health and (e) — . It has organized (f) — programmes for (g) — health workers to (h) — health help to the rural (i) —. At present it is trying to (j) — primary education particularly among girls.

14. [COMILLA BOARD-2012, DINAJPUR BOARD-2012, CHITTAGONG BOARD-2006] If we (a) — forests and cut (b) — trees, the effects  might eventually (c) — us all. If forests (d) — into deserts, what will (e) — carbon  dioxide? Then the weather pattern (f) — change and the world will become (g) — . This is called the green house effect. As a (h) — of this effect the polar ice caps will (i) — and this will cause the flood of (j) — areas of the globe.

15. [CHITTAGONG BOARD-2012, COMILLA BOARD-2006] Learning a language is (a) — riding a cycle. The most (b) — thing (c) — any language is communication. You learn to (d) — effectively by using a language, by doing things with it and by experiencing it. You (e) — learn English in the same (f) — as one learns to ride a cycle. Do not (g) — if people laugh at you (h) — you make (i) — . You can certainly learn (j) — mistakes.

16. [SYLHET BOARD-2012, CHITTAGONG BOARD-2009] Man pollutes water, an important (a) — of the environment by (b) — waste into it. Farmers (c) — chemical fertilizers and insecticides in their fields. Some of these chemicals (d) _____ away by rain and floods (e) — mixed with water in rivers, canals and ponds. Water is also (f) — by mills and factories which throw their (g) — chemicals and waste products into rivers and canals. Water vehicles also pollute water by (h) — oil, food waste and human waste into them. In sanitary latrines (i) — on river and canal banks are also (j) — for further pollution.

17. [BARISAL BOARD-2012] William Caxton introduced printing into England. His success as a merchant enabled him (a) — retire early and (b) — himself to literary pursuits. In 1477, he set up his (c) — press and (d) — nearly a hundred books. A (e) — of prodigious industry, he translated twenty (f) — himself. What is more (g) — him is that he published books in English when most works appeared (h) — French or Latin. Caxton (i) — it as his aim to hasten the spread of knowledge by making books (j) — to the public in English.

18. [RAJSHAHI BOARD-2011] Computer is one of the latest important and most (a) — invention of science. A computer performs three important (b) — . It receives data, processes data (c) — various computations and emits data. Computer now (d) — us in various ways. In a (e) — minutes a computer can perform calculations that trained mathematicians would need years to complete. Now computers are (f) — used in agricultural farms. Trains and planes are run by the (g) — . (h) — results can be accurately given by computer within the shortest span of time. The computer has become very sophisticated and can perform (i) — complicated tasks. This is why many people call the computer “an electronic (j) — .”

19. [JESSORE BOARD-2011] Rose is a symbol of (a) — . I have a rose garden. The garden looks (b) — when the roses bloom. It (c) — sweet. The (d) — and fragrance of the rose attract all. I pluck roses from my garden (e) — our house (f) — . Now-a-days many people (g) — roses. The (h) — of rose is profitable. So we should (f) — roses and only to earn money but also to (j) — our houses.

20. [CHITTAGONG BOARD-2011] Today women (a) — an important role in all spheres of life. They (b) — no longer within the four walls of their home. They have (c) — out of their kitchens and are (d) — with men in all the development programmes of the government. Many women have (e) — higher education and are (f) — as doctors, engineers, teachers, administrations, judge etc. They have been able to (g) — their worth. However, women still face (h) — discrimination. Many girls are married (i) — at an early age. Many never (j) — to school.

21. [DINAJPUR BOARD-2011] Returning home can be very difficult. When people (a) — to their home countries, they often find many changes. The (b) — old streets may not look the same. People they remember may not (c) — them. If they go back to their own childhood house, the house may look very (d) — . It may (e) — small and cramped. One woman wrote that she returned to her (f) — and her house was gone. In its (g) — , there was a little, modern grocery shop. No one (h) — her. She was extremely (i) — . It is also possible to return to a place where everyone remembers you. That makes a person feel happy inside; at least you were not (j) — .

22. [DHAKA BOARD-2010] Language plays a very (a) — role in our life. We use language from the (b) — we wake up in the morning (c) — we go to bed at night. We use language not only during our (d) — hours but also in our dreams. We use language to (e) — what we feel and to say (f) — we like or dislike. We also use language to (g) — information. In short language is (h) — present in our life. It is an (i) — part of what we do, (j) — and believe.

23. [RAJSHAHI  BOARD-2010, COMILLA BOARD-2009] Dhaka is the capital of Bangladesh. It is a (a) — city. It is a city (b) — traffic jam. A fly (c) — is built at Mohakhali with a view to (d) — the traffic jam. To solve this problem, traffic rules (e) — be enforced. Besides this drivers, passers-by and (f) — should honour and abide (g) — all rules (h) — making the city habitable. Otherwise our life (i) — remain (j) — stake.

24. [JESSORE BOARD-2010] Man pollutes water, another vital (a) — of the environment by dumping (b) — into it. Farmers (c) — chemicals, washed away by rain and flood, (d) — mixed water with in river, canals and ponds. Water is also (e) — by mills and factories when they throw their (f) — chemicals and waste products into rivers and canals. Water vehicles also pollute rivers by dumping oil, food waste and human waste (g) — them. Insanitary latrines (h) — on river and canal banks are also (i) _____ for further pollution. In this way, various (j) — of waste and filth pollute water.

25. [COMILLA BOARD-2010, RAJSHAHI BOARD-2007, DHAKA BOARD-2005] Modern life (a) — much on transport. We can very well (b) — how important transport is when it is (c) — by natural calamities or during socio-political crises. In fact, transport has made it (d) — for us to reach places previously (e) — . It has (f) — helped the flourish of trade and commerce and to (g) — new knowledge and ideas. (h) — transport has (i) — friendship and understanding among nations and people (j) — the globe.

26. [CHITTAGONG BOARD-2010] It is a happy news that the (a) — of adopting unfair means in the examination has been (b) — to a greater extent. Our students have now (c) — that passing in the examination is not the only goal of student life. But still this heinous (d) — has not been totally (e) — . When an examinee is caught copying in the examination there is nothing open to authority (f) — to (g) — him /her. This damages not only the concerned examinee, but also (h) — a total loss to the whole family of that examinee So, our students must refrain themselves (i) — this bad practice. They should also remember that a building (j) — strong foundation must fall down either today or tomorrow.

27. [SYLHET BOARD-2010] One day a fox was very (a) — . It was (b) — for some food to eat. But it could not manage any (c) — . At last it became very (d) — and sat (e) — a tree. A crow was sitting on the tree with a (f) — of meat in its beak. The fox looked at the crow and (g) — the piece of meat. An idea came to its mind to (h) — the meat from the crow. The fox said loudly “(i) — a beautiful bird it is! But alas! the bird (j) — not sing.”

28. [BARSIAL BOARD-2010] Electricity is (a) — a part of our everyday (b) — that we rarely think twice about its importance and necessity. When we switch (c) — the light and the fan or turn on our television and computer, we enjoy (d) — blessing of electricity. Even when we turn off the bedside lamp and are fast asleep, (e) — remains working for us driving our fans, heating or cooling our rooms and running our refrigerators. Unfortunately, we (f) — enjoy the uninterrupted blessings of electricity. There is some (g) — in the generation (h) — electricity in Bangladesh. (i) — , load-shedding or suspension of the supply of electricity has (j) — a regular programme of the power Development Board.

29. [DINAJPUR BOARD-2010] Everybody (a) — to live a happy and peaceful life. But what are the (b) — that can assure you of such a nice life? Naturally people’s opinions are quite different on this point. The factors (c) — be money, power, security, honour, love, health, good family bondage, education, voluptuous pleasures etc.  Most people (d) — money alone can ensure all other elements (e) — for a happy life. It’s partly true. But if you (f) — stick to money, you may start running after money. But you cannot live in two rooms, cannot (g) — two persons’ food etc. at the (h) —  time. You should bear in (i) — that your necessity or desire has a limit. If you exceed the limit and run (j) — money with an endless greed, you will be utterly ruined.

30. [DHAKA BOARD-2009] An elephant does many things with its trunk. It smells, feels and picks things up with its (a) — . Elephants can uproot trees (b) — their trunks. They can defend themselves by wrapping their trunks (c) — enemies and dashing them (d) — the ground. They used their trunks to eat (e) — peanuts too. They can even brush (f) — flies. In the lumberyards of India elephants learn to pull logs out (g) — rivers and stack them. Elephants have even been taught to sweep. By holding a broom in (h) — trunk, an elephant can (i) — a road clean of dust. What a wonderful (j) — that trunk is!

31. [RAJSHAHI BOARD-2009, SYLHET BOARD–2003] One day a lad went to a famous teacher and having expressed his desires to (a) — knowledge, begged him to (b) — him in the arts and science. The learned man wishing to (c) — out what sort of ability the lad (d) — , asked him where God (e) —. Then lad replied, “I will answer you, if you will first (f) — me where He is (g) — .” The sage, from this sensible (h) — , thought highly of the boy’s (i) — and according to his (j) — perfected him in his studies. Thus, the wisdom of the wise manifests itself early.

32. [JESSORE BOARD-2009] While eating food we have to (a) — that we should not eat just to satisfy hunger or to (b) — the stomach. We should (c) — to preserve our health. For good (d) — we need good food. Sometimes it so happens that people (e) — live even in the midst of plenty, do not eat the (f) — they need for a good health as they (g) — no knowledge of health and nutrition. Again the poor illiterate people think that good food (h) — costly food. They do not (i) — that whatever food they get can be nutritive (j) — they can select the food items wisely to make a balanced diet.

33. [SYLHET BOARD-2009] The Shatgombuj mosque is a 15 Century Islamic (a) — situated in the suburbs of Bagerhat, on the (b) — of the Sunderbans, some 175 km. south-west of Dhaka. It is an (c) — Mughal architectural site (d) — a very large area. The Mosque is (e) — in that it has sixty pillars, which (f) — seventy seven exquisitely (g) — domes that have worn away with the (h) — of time. The mausoleum of the city’s (i) — Khan Jahan Ali can be found nearby. With the (j) — of the mosque as a World Heritage Site it is hoped that this beautiful architectural monument will be preserved from further decay.

34. [DINAJPUR BOARD-2009] Bangladesh is one of the (a) — countries of the United Nations. As a peace-loving and (b) — country she has been undertaking welfare and (c) — activities in line (d) — the United Nations. Bangladesh has (e) — the UN declaration of the second decade (f) — the disabled in the Asia and the Pacific region. Along (g) — other governments of this region she is (h) — to implement the charter. There is also provision in our constitution for ensuring health (i) — , education and employment for the (j) —.

35. [DHAKA BOARD-2008] Michael Baumann is a lawyer. He doesn’t like (a) — who talk too much. He himself (b) — to speak very little. He doesn’t (c) — a beard but he (d) — an enormous moustache. He (e) — it makes him look important. He does not have a lot of (f) — on his head but he isn’t (g) — either. His hair is not straight but (h) — . He is (i) — his fifties and (j) — to eat.

36. [COMILLA BOARD-2008, SYLHET BOARD-2005] Sincerity is the best way of achieving success. One can go a long way if one does anything with sincerity. People who are sincere to their work are (a) — of making anything success. The great men are also sincere because they (b) — that sincerity is the (c) — to success. Those who are not (d) — can never (e) — a long way in the world. The poor people are not always sincere, because they do not know the (f) — of sincerity. If they knew it, they would (g) — a good use of it. Sincerity (h) — _ not only to do work properly, but also with dutifulness, honesty, modesty and good behaviour. The people of our country are not still (i) — of the (j) — of sincerity.

37. [CHITTAGONG BOARD-2008] Natural disaster (a) — throughout the world in recent years. The main reason behind this is greenhouse effect or (b) — of the air (c) — the earth. Global warming in melting the (d) — ice of polar regions and of the peaks of (e) — mountains. Consequently the (f) — of sea water has alarmingly increased. Cyclones and tidal bores (g) — inundating and destroying the coastal regions to a large extent. Climatologists (h) — that in the last 185 years 99 cyclones hit the coastal (i) — and off shore islands of our country causing irrecoverable loss (j) — life and properties.

38. [SYLHET BOARD-2008] Who is to control the crimes of the country? The rich? The government? Who? It is everybody’s responsibility. In a country where everybody is trying to defeat every other one to make unlimited wealth as quickly as possible, it is very difficult to curb the crimes. Almost all contribute to crime and disorder in one or the other (a) — . World Bank and other International Organisations have published (b) — on corruption and human rights violation in Bangladesh. They have also suggested how to (c) — the existing situation. But none of them is (d) — so far. It is alleged that most of the political parties are (e) — to gain their party interests. They have also divided the nation ideologically. National (f) — is a dream that might never come true. Sometimes some so called intellectuals write some article in newspapers. But that brings no (g) — . Abuse of (h) — by the public servants has led the nation to its present situation. The representatives of the people are being mainly (i) — for it. But it is not the only truth. Let us all be united to bring an end to this deteriorating (j) — .

39. [DHAKA BOARD-2007] Television has become a (a) — source of entertainment of the present world. A wide (b) — of programmes is (c) _____ on numerous channels. Almost every family has a television (d) — today. Television (e) _____ are not only entertaining, they can be highly (f) — too. For example, television is now (g) — used for distance learning. Courses (h) — by the Open University are shown on BTV. Several channels like the Discovery telecast informative and (i) — programmes. However, watching TV (j) — is not permissible.

40. [JESSORE BOARD-2007, COMILLA BOARD–2003] Money is power and can do much good and evil. It gives (a) — and delight. It (b) — do everything. A person without (c) — is a person to be pitied. Nobody pays (d) — respect to him. His friends do not (e) — him. He has to depend on the (f) — of others. In order to (g) — money he does a lot of jobs. It is a must (h) — our life. But it does not necessarily (i) — happiness. Happiness is absolutely a (j) — matter.

41. [CHITTAGONG BOARD-2007] No other word is so (a) — as the word ‘Mother’. It is (b) — up with our existence. Everyone starts his life first (c) — the word, ‘mother’. This word lasts to the child (d) — death. It is mother, who first becomes touched (e) — our happiness and sorrows. We know about the mother of Bayejid Bostami (f) — Ishwar Chandra Vidyasagar. In every religion the position of mother is (g) — the highest place. Our great Prophet Hazrat Mohammad (Sm.) (h) — that “Heaven is at the (i) — of mother”. So, when I think of my mother, my head (j) — down.

42. [SYLHET BOARD-2007] A large number of people (a) — English all over the world. Some people use it as a (b) — language and some people take it as a (c) — language. Many international (d) — now depend on English to (e) — with offices in different countries. Their advertisements published in different (f) — are always in (g) — . They also want people who possess a good (h) — knowledge of English. People seeking employment (i) — expect to get good jobs without (j) — English.

43. [DHAKA BOARD-2006] There have been (a) — changes in the types of entertainment over time. Many of these no longer exist. Even if they do, people keep looking for newer forms of (b)—. Thus snake charming, puppet show, Jatragan, Jarigan, Sharigan and Kabigan which were common forms of entertainment in the past, have almost lost their (c)—. Radio is now giving place to television and to (d) — channels in particular. The entertainment business, like other spheres of life, is getting (e) — day by day. Folk music or palligeeti is now sung with western (f) —. At the same time, (g) — music is now fusing melodies from folk and traditional songs. In general, band and pop music are becoming more and more (h) — particularly among the (i) — generation. Sport has become a great source of entertainment (j) —.

44. [RAJSHAHI BOARD-2006] I do not think that it is (a) — not to make any (b) — while learning English because we (c) — through trial and error. I think it is better to (d) — English without paying much (e) — on being correct because it is not important to (f) — always correct English. I do not (g) — that a shy man can never (h) — English. This is because a shy man can learn English by (i) — English newspapers, (j) — and various text books.

45. [JESSORE BOARD-2006] Traffic jam is one of the major problems of our time. It is a very (a) — affair in big cities and towns. Our population has (b) — very fast over the last fifty years or so. The (c) — of vehicles has also gone up. But our roads are not broad (d) — to accommodate so many buses, trucks and cars. Slow moving vehicles (e) — rickshaws and baby taxies have added complications to the problem. On top of that our drivers are not very willing to (f) — traffic rules. They often (g) — impatient and look to go (h) — of one another (i) — traffic signals. Sometimes they (j) — recklessly and meet horrible road accidents.

46. [BARISAL BOARD-2006] From the moment we are born we cannot (a) — alone. We are always in (b) — of assistance of (c) — others around us. We need clothes, which others (d) —; houses, which others (e) — and food, which others (f) —. We have to earn our livelihood by (g) — for others, while they get their livelihood by working for us. As children, we need our parents to be our comforters, and to take (h) — of us in body and (i) —. As we grow up we need to care of others; we cannot exist a day (j) — our fellowmen.

47. [RAJSHAHI BOARD-2005] Newspapers in Bangladesh have constantly (a) — our attention to the (b) — safety measures provided by (c) — garment factories. They (d) — adequate space, (e) — staircases and (f) — exists. (g) — addition, most of the garment (h) — do not have any training (i) — fire safety. At least 104 garment employees were (j) — in fire related incidents.

48. [JESSORE BOARD-2005] Your performance in the interview is very important, even (a) — some people regard (b) — as poor predictors of future (c) —. There is a good (d) — of subjectivity in an interview to judge a (e) —, but as a candidate, the subjectivity inherent in interviews can work to your (f) —. If you manifest confidence and enthusiasm, smile a (g) — and generally look as through you know (h) — you are talking about, then you are will on the (i) —, to a result (j) —you respond is probably more important than what you say.

49. [COMILLA BOARD-2005] Riaz is fed (a) — with his next door (b) —. His bed room is very (c) — to theirs. Every time he sits down to (d) — in the evening (e) — comes the blaring sound of the television (f) — the house next door. It (g) — that the TV is kept (h) — the whole evening. In winter he can bear it by (i) — his window closed (j) — in summer it gets too hot and stuffy in the window is kept closed.

50. [CHITTAGONG BOARD-2005] The great ship “Titanic” (a) — for New York from Southampton on April 10, 1912. She was (b) —1316 passengers and a crew of 891. At that time, however, she was the only largest ship that had been (c) — built. She was regarded as unsinkable for she had sixteen water-tight compartments. The tragic (d) — of the great ship will always be remembered, for she went down on her maiden (e) — with a heavy loss of life. Four days after setting out, while the Titanic was sailing (f) — the icy water of the North Atlantic, a huge ice-berg was suddenly spotted (g) — the lookout. After the alarm had been given, the great ship turned sharply to avoid a (h) —. Suddenly, there was slight trembling sound from below and the captain went down to see what had (i) —. The noise had been so faint that no one thought that the ship had been damaged. Below the captain realised to his horror that the ‘Titanic’ was sinking rapidly, for five of the sixteen water-tight compartments had already been (j) —.

51. [BARISAL BOARD-2005] In the polar regions, one kind of houses is made of glass for growing crops in it. When the rays of the sun fall on earth, their wave-length is so small that they (a) — on the soil inside the house without (b) — the glass walls. When those rays are reflected by the earth, their wave-length gets (c) — and thus they can easily heat, the glass-walls. This process of artificially heating up the glass-houses is called the green house effect. Though it is fundamentally the (d) — of a scientific process, now we (e) — by it to a dangerous effect being caused in the atmosphere. For various scientific reasons, now a days the amount of carbondioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, chlorofluro carbons are (f) — in the atmosphere. Consequently, when the rays of the sun, after being (g) — by the earth, goes up with larger wave lengths, the abovementioned gases get heated by it (h) — the glass-walls of the aforesaid green house. The result is obvious and fatal : the temperature of the (i) — around the earth increases more than (j) —.

52. [DHAKA BOARD-2004] Many events of (a) — importance took place during the last century. Significant advances were made in the (b) — of science and technology. Many European colonies (c) — independence. The movement for democracy become (d) — in many parts of the world. Two world wars (e) — out in this century. It also witnessed the misuse of atomic energy. Two cities of Japan were completely (f) — as a result of the dropping of atom bombs. The Vietnam war and the Gulf war killed (g) — of innocent people. However, the emergence of Bangladesh as an (h) — nation was a momentous event. After a bloody (i) — of nine months, Bangladesh was born. Now we hold our heads (j) — in the comity of nations.

53. [RAJSHAHI BOARD-2004] A large number of people (a) — English all over the world. Some people use it as a (b) — language and some people take it as a (c) — language. Many international (d) — now depend on English to (e) — with offices in different countries. Their advertisements published in different (f) — are always in (g) —. They also want people who possess a good (h) — knowledge of English. People seeking employment (i) — expect to get good jobs without (j) — English.

54. [JESSORE BOARD-2004] Amin is a young man of 20 years. His parents were very poor. They could not provide his educational (a) —. Amin passed the S.S.C Examination. He thought that he (b) — not be able to continue his studies. The thought that he would get (c) — in poultry and cultivation of fish. He get himself admitted into Youth Development Training Center and after (d) — training he (e) — an amount of money from a bank. He (f) — a poultry farm. He was (g) — profits. Then he started fish cultivation (h) — brought huge (i) — for him. He is no more an (j) — man rather he can provide people with work.

55. [COMILLA BOARD-2004] Bangladesh is a country (a) — an area of 1,47,570 square kilometres. It is (b) — with more than 120 million people. About one thousand people (c) — per square kilometre. So it is a (d) — populated country. The growth rate is very (e) — which must be (f) — immediately. If this rate (g) — on unchecked. Bangladesh will (h) — a great problem. So everyone should (i) — forward to (j) — public consciousness.

56. [CHITTAGONG BOARD-2004] For international communication a common language is (a) —. There are many (b) — for which English has achieved the (c) — of being that language. Now English has (d) — the national borders to (e) — people who speak other languages. It is no longer the (f) — possession of British or American or other native speakers, but a language that belongs to (g) — people. This phenomenon has led to a (h) — variety of English around the world. As more and more people speak English, more and more varieties have (i) — which are strongly (j) — by the pronunciation, grammar and idioms of the respective mother tongues.

57. [SYLHET BOARD-2004] Atom bomb was first (a) — on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the World War II. When the first bomb (b) —, the world knew for the first time that man (c) — at long last been in possession of a force (d) — in all respects. The atom bomb (e) —. But alas! the superhuman energy has been (f) — against mankind. One single bomb (g) — the (h) — town Hiroshima and another bomb Nagasaki. There had (i) — many children, women and patients not (j) — in the problems of the war.

58. [BARISAL BOARD-2004] Student life is a life of (a) — for future struggle. To make him (b) — for the struggle, education is necessary. So the first and foremost duty of a student (c) — to prosecute his studies well. He who (d) — his lessons regularly (e) — well in the examination. On the (f) — the student who wastes his time cuts a (g) — figure. It should be (h) — in mind that none can get back the (i) — time. If the students neglect their studies they will suffer in the (j) — run.

59. [DHAKA BOARD-2003] Housing is one of the (a) — problems of our (b) —. Thousands of people in big (c) — like Dhaka and Chittagong dwell on the footpaths. In rural (d) — also there is an acute (e) — of houses. The cost of construction is (f) — everyday. At present it is very (g) — for the common (h) — to afford the (i) — of construction. This problem needs to be (j) — immediately.

60. [RAJSHAHI BOARD–2003] One day a grocer borrowed a balance and weights from a fruit seller. After a few days the fruit seller asked the grocer to (a) — his balance and weights to him. The grocer said, “I am sorry to say that the mice ate away your balance and weights.” The fruit seller became very (b) — at the (c) — excuse of the dishonest grocer. Then one day the fruit seller said to the grocer, “I am (d) — to the town to do some shopping. Please send your son with me to (e) — my things. We will come back tomorrow.” So the grocer (f) — his son with the fruit seller. The next day the fruit seller returned alone from the town. “Where is my son?” asked the grocer. “A crow carried your son away,” replied the fruit seller. “How can a crow (g) — away such a big boy?” The grocer shouted angrily. “Just the same way as the mice can (h) — away the balance and weights,” said the fruit seller. ‘The grocer (i) — the point. He returned the balance and weights to the fruit seller. Then the fruit seller sent the boy (j) — to his father.

61. [COMILLA BOARD–2003] Money is power and can do much good and evil. It gives (a) — and delight. It (b) — do everything. A person (c) — is a person to be pitied. Nobody pays (d) — respect to him. His friends do not (e) — him. He has to depend on the (f) — of others. In order to (g) — money he does a lot of jobs. It is a must (h) _____ our life. But it does not necessarily (i) — happiness. Happiness is absolutely a (j) — matter.

62. [CHITTAGONG BOARD–2003] Jerry was a twelve years old boy (a) — lived in the orphanage. The authoress hired the cabin (b) — to the orphanage. Jerry came to the cabin to (c) — wood for the authoress. He also did some extra work (d) — the convenience of the authoress. Once he (e) — a cubby hole where he put some kindling and medium wood (f) — that the writer might get dry fire materials ready in case of (g) — wet weather. The authoress was pleased (h) — him. When she gave him some candy or apples, he used to (i) — silent. He expressed his (j) — by looking at the gift and the authoress.

63. [BARISAL BOARD–2003] Sports can give us (a) —. International sports (b) — organise different sporting events in different (c) —. Most of these events are sponsored by multinational manufacturing companies and business firm. They pay for the sport event. They do it because in (d) — they get the right of (e) — their products (f) — the events. The satellite channels (g) — the events (h) —. As a (i) —, people all over the world can (j) — the events live.

64. Have you heard the name of Orpheus? He is a (a) — character. He was the son of Apollo, the god of music who (b) — him a lyre. Apollo taught him how to (c) — on it. Orpheus mastered the lesson successfully. Devotion and practice made him (d) —. Nothing could withstand the (e) — of his music. His fellow mortals and wild animals were (f) — by his music. He is (g) — to Tansen in Bengal myth. Men and animals crowded (h) — him. To hear the soft mournful songs of Orpheus, vale and dale, fauna and flora would (i) — even he rescued his (j) — wife from underworld by singing melancholic song.

65. Beauty is easy to appreciate but difficult to define. As we look around, we discover beauty in (a) — objects and sights in nature, in the (b) — of children, in the kindness of strangers. But asked to define, we run into (c) —. Does beauty have an independent objective identity? Is it (d) — or is it dependent on our sense (e) —? Does it lie in the (f) — of the beholder? Thus, we ask (g) —. However, poets, artists, philosophers and thinkers (h) — always in search of beauty in their works and arts. But most of them have the common opinion that where there is beauty, there is (i) — that is a thing of beauty is a joy (j) —.

66. Many diseases are rising at an (a) — rate, which experts believe is due to (b) — pollution of the (c) —. Pollution appears to be (d) — in urban area (e) — rural societies too are (f) — by increased use of (g) — fertilizer and insecticides. Nevertheless, today city people appear to suffer from many more (h) — and (i) — more (j) — than country people.

67. Bangladesh is blessed with huge inland open water resources. It has (a) — rivers, canals, beels, lakes, (b) — vast areas of flood plains. Hakaluki (c) — is one of the major (d) — of Bangladesh. With at least (e) — of 18,386 hectares. It supports (f) — rich biodiversity and provides (g) — and indirect livelihood benefits to (h) — 1,90,000 people. This haor was (i) — an Ecologically Critical Area (j) — April 1999 by the government of Bangladesh.

68. Overeating (a) — taking too much food (b) — one needs. We eat (c) — to overload our stomach but to (d) — a sound health. A sound health (e) — on eating habit, to some extent. Overeating tells (f) — our health. By (g) — awareness of the people, the habit of overeating can be (h) —. With a view to (i) — our body fit, we should (j) — taking too much food.

69. Kuakata is one of the (a) — spots which allows a (b) — to watch both the sunrise and the (c) — from the beach. That perhaps makes Kuakata one of the (d) — most attractive beaches. The long and (e) —— beach at Kuakata has a typical (f) — setting. This sandy beach slops (g) — into the Bay and bathing there is as (h) — as is swimming or diving. Kuakata is (i) — a virgin beach and a (j) — for migratory winter birds.

70. Food adulteration is one of the (a) — problems in the recent time in our country. Different food and food products, vegetables, fruits and fishes are being (b) — (c) — the unscrupulous and profit-monger businessmen and green grocers. However, we, the general people (d) — the victims (e) — all sorts of pangs and serious diseases. The businessmen use (f) — chemicals such as DDT, Aldrin, Heptachlor just to make their products (g) — attractive or to (h) — them for a long time. So, it is time the authorities concerned took (i) — steps to stop such food adulteration. Proper monitoring, supervision and public awareness should be compulsory from (j) — level to consumers.

71. There goes a proverb that child is (a) — of the man. Today’s child is the (b) — of a nation. He will (c) — the country. The whole (d) — depends on their proper (e) —. It is our fundamental (f) — to rouse their (g) — talent. A sound environment is (h) — both in the family and society so that a child (i) — up physically, mentally and spiritually. Only then it will be (j) — to build up a beautiful and developed country.

72. Conflict can be (a) — as clash of values and ideas among other things and the most serious form of conflict is (b) — clashes that results in lots of (c) — casualties. There can be conflict (d) — which is (e) — intrapersonal conflict. The conflict between or (f) — persons is called (g) — conflict. Constraint of resources is also a (h) — of conflict and it is known as (i) — conflict. Conflict is a very common phenomenon. But sometimes it takes (j) —.

73. While many alternatives to fossil fuels have been investigated, there is quite a way to go before mankind’s energy supply is completely renewable. As of today, about 85% of (a) — energy comes from fossil fuels. The (b) — clean energy is considered to be (c) —— is because fossil fuels are not expected (d) — last much longer, they pollute the (e) —, and they have led to tensions (f) — nations. The reason clean energy is (g) — to come by is that we have (h) — the past 150 years dependent on (i) — and it is quite difficult to make (j) — switch. Some have even suggested that the technology for producing vast amounts of clean energy already exists but is being suppressed by big oil companies.

74. Hakaluki Haor has both (a) — and non-economic (b) —. It (c) — a wide range of the local people. People (d) — here can produce fish and rice, rare (e) —, buffalo and duck. They can also (f) — reeds (g) — grass in the haor. This  haor (h) — also provides (i) — place for the (j) — birds.

75. Independence is the (a) — of a man. But no nation can (b) — it without struggle. Our War of Independence (c) — in 1971. People of all walks of (d) — joined the war with a smiling face to (e) — the country. They (f) — face to face the enemy. They did not run (g) — showing their backs. Many died while (h) —. Again many of them (i) — killed. Today we remember them with profound (j) —.

76. A student or learner can improve all his latent talents through the channel of proper education. Proper education aims at (a) — him not only physically (b) — also mentally. Such education (c) — him an ideal man, (d) — can lead both himself (e) — society to the way (f) — happiness and prosperity. A (g) — educated man is sympathetic, (h) — and kind. Indeed, proper (i) — makes him mentally and (j) —developed.

77. Traffic jam is one of the major problems of our time. It is a very (a) — affair in big cities and towns. Our population has (b) — very fast over the last fifty years or so. The (c) — of vehicles has also gone up. But our roads are not broad (d) — to accommodate so many buses, trucks and cars. Slow-moving vehicles (e) — rickshaws and baby-taxies have added complications to the problem. On top of that our drivers are not very willing to (f) — traffic rules. They often (g) — impatient and look to go (h) — of one another (i) — traffic signals. Sometimes they (j) — recklessly and meet horrible road accident.

78. Accessibility to higher education (a) — that students get the (b) — to get university education and (c) — support from educational institutions. Increasing (d) — at the secondary and higher secondary level puts (e) — on higher educational institutions. But due to (f) — capacity, only a small number of students may be enrolled in universities. Thus, each year a huge number of students are denied (g) —— to higher education. Also, due to (h) — and increase in educational (i) —, students of the lower middle class do not get easy access to higher education. Moreover, those who get places in the universities have limited access to avail all kinds of diversified (j) — facilities relating to their study-fields.

79. Education is one of the basic needs of a human being. It is (a) — for the (b) — of mind. Many illiterate people do not have any (c) — of health. If they (d) — educated, they could lead a (e) — and planned life. Education teaches us how to live well. It (f) — us to make the right (g) — in life. It enhances our (h) — to perform our duties properly and (i) — our everyday problems. In fact, it is education (j) — brings positive changes in our life.

80. Sports are a popular form of entertainment. Many international sporting events are (a) — from time to time. Most of these events are (b) — by multinational manufacturing (c) — and business firms. They pay for the sports events in (d) — for the right to (e) — their products during those events. These events are (f) — worldwide by satellite and people all over the world watch them (g) —. As a (h) —, the sponsors’ products (i) — maximum media coverage. This is the commercial (j) — of sports.

81. Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman is the (a) — leader of Bangladesh. He delivered an illustrious and (b) — speech on 7 March in 1971. He made his speech in the presence of a (c) — gathering of people at Suhrawardy Udyan (the then Race Course Maidan). Many (d) — of the past led him to deliver the speech. In his speech, he (e) — the history of Bengal as a history of (f) — and deprivation. Through his speech, he (g) — the people of Bangladesh to get (h) — for the Liberation War. He told the people to fight against the (i) — of West Pakistan. He declared the independence of Bangladesh (j) —.

82. Today women (a) — an important role in all spheres of life. They (b) — no longer within the four walls of their home. They have (c) — out of their kitchens and are (d) — with men in all development programmes of the government. Many women have (e) — higher education and are (f) — as doctors, engineers, teachers, administrators, judges, etc. They have been able to (g) — their worth. However, women still face (h) — discrimination. Many girls are married off (i) — at an early age. Many never (j) — to school.

83. A dictionary is one of the most important (a) — in the life of people. It (b) — the words in a language (c) — in order that the reader may (d) — them easily. A dictionary entry gives us the accepted spelling of a word, its (e) — into syllable, its pronunciation, its origins and its meanings. Sometimes a dictionary also provides (f) — meanings as well as opposite meanings of a word. In addition, if the word is a noun that (g) — a visible thing, the dictionary may provide an (h) — of it. Dictionaries of the past, present and future can become our teachers and good friends. Besides, a dictionary (i) — our word-stock and beautifies our diction of speech. So, it should no way (j) —.

84. Bangladesh is recognized throughout the world as a pioneer in microcredit. Despite (a) — criticisms, it cannot be denied that microcredit (b) — significantly to poverty reduction. Recent study (c) — concluded that microcredit programmes helped participants earn (d) — income, consume more and thereby lifted many (e) — them out of poverty. The reduction of (f) —, in particular, the reduction of extreme poverty (g) — microcredit is very successful. The contribution of (h) — programme to women empowerment is also praiseworthy. (i) — helps the rural women to earn and (j) — small business.

85. Scientists have recently reported that the polar ice caps are melting. This is due to a rise in (a) — temperatures known as the ‘greenhouse effect’. Carbon dioxide is (b) — responsible for temperature rise in the atmosphere. The carbon dioxide is (c) — off when coal and oil are burnt. This gas is (d) — in the air and the ice caps in the North and South poles are melting. This may (e) — lead to a rise in the sea levels which could (f) — many areas of the globe. The ‘greenhouse effect’ is just one of the many (g) — changes which are taking place in the environment. Tropical rainforests, which took fifty million years (h) — are being (i) — at the rate of fourteen acres per minute. The total area of the world’s deserts is increasing every year. Many species of animals and plants are (j) — with the threat of extinction.

86. Banks are part and parcel of a civilized nation. They are called the (a) — of any civilized nation. Banking activity is the true index of commercial and industrial (b) — of a country. It supplies blood in the financial (c) — of the nation by mobilizing savings and creating (d) — facilities for the economic development of the country. But unfortunately, our (e) — banks only look after the (f) — of upper class people. They are (g) — to give loan to common rural people. But some non-conventional banks specially Grameen Bank have come forward to provide loan to the poor, (h) — to poor rural women. They have created jobs for many educated (i) — youth. Taking loans from the bank, the poor women have improved their (j) — condition.

87. The craft of (a) — paper to give them different (b) — without any cutting or pasting is called Oregami. Although not much is known about its (c) —, Oregami has been (d) — in the Orient for (e) —. In fact, it has taken the form of sophisticated (f) — in Japan where it is specially (g) — for decorating and for (h) —. As a form of (i) — plaything, Oregami takes the form of birds, fish, insects, animals and geometrical figures, sometimes with (j) — parts to imitate the movement of real life objects.

88. Research has shown that air pollutants from (a) — fuel use make clouds reflect more of the sun’s rays (b) — into space. This leads to an effect known as global (c) — whereby less heat and energy reaches the earth. At first, it (d) — like an ironic savior to climate change problems. However, it is believed that global dimming (e) — the droughts in Ethiopia in the 1970s and 80s where millions died, because the northern (f) — Oceans were not warm enough to allow (g) — formation. Global dimming is also (h) — the true power of global warming. By cleaning up global dimming-causing pollutants without (i) — greenhouse gas emissions, rapid warming has been observed, and various human health and ecological disasters have resulted, as (j) — during the European heat wave in 2003, which saw thousands of people die. 

89. Kuakata is truly a (a) — beach and it is (b) — as a sanctuary for (c) — winter birds. Fishing boats (d) — in the Bay of Bengal with colourful sails. The lines of coconut trees contribute to the (e) — beauty of Kuakata. The (f) — culture of the Rakhaine community indicates the (g) — old tradition and cultural (h) — of this area. Kuakata is also a (i) — land for the Hindus and the Buddhists. Each year this place is (j) — by thousands of devotees.

90. Food adulteration is one of the (a) — problems in the recent time in our country. Different food and food products, vegetables, fruits and fishes are being (b) — (c) — the unscrupulous and profit-monger businessmen and green grocers. However, we, the general people (d) — the victims (e) — all sorts of pangs and serious diseases. The businessmen use (f) — chemicals such as DDT, Aldrin, Heptachlor just to make their products (g) — attractive or to (h) — them for a long time. So, it is time the authority concerned took (i) — steps to stop such food adulteration. Proper monitoring, supervision, and public awareness should be compulsory from (j) — level to consumers.

91. Unsafe levels of pesticides are present in around half of the vegetables and more than a quarter of fruits sold in the capital’s markets, a recent (a) — has found. A 15-member team of the National Food Safety Laboratory, with support from the (b) — (FAO), came up with the findings after collecting and testing food samples from the capital’s Gulshan, Karwanbazar and Mohakhali markets. The survey report, a copy of which was acquired by the Dhaka Tribune, read that nearly 40% of 82 samples of milk, milk products, fish, fruits and vegetables contained banned (c) —  such as DDT, Aldrin, Chlordane and Heptachlor. The Director of Institute of Public Health (IPH), told the Dhaka Tribune that the (d) — report has been submitted to the Health Ministry. Further tests of different  products were being (e) — out at the Food Safety Lab. (f) — food products are reportedly the cause behind thousands of people suffering from (g) — diseases like cancer, kidney failure and heart problems. Health specialists told the Dhaka Tribune that the Ministry of (h) — had enacted a Food Safety Act, but was yet to prepare the necessary rules. As the issue of food safety was also linked to 14 other ministries, a coordinated agency should take (i) — of ensuring safety in (j) — products, they added.

92. Bangladesh has a heritage of rich folk music (a) — both religious and secular songs. Folk music usually (b) — from the (c) — of the heart of a community. Folk music means the (d) — of folk song, dance and tune that are (e) — on the basis of country festivals, natural beauty, rural and riverine life. In Bangladesh folk music (f) — from region to region and so there are the northern Bhawaiya, the eastern Bhatiyali and the southern Baul songs in our country. The cultural of (g) — tribes has influenced folk music. Folk music that has a lot of characteristic is (h) — by rural folk. Mystical songs (i) — to folk songs have been composed using the metaphors of rivers and boats. In short, the (j) — of folk music in our country is beyond description.

93. Man’s dignity depends upon his work. Man is a (a) — being on earth. He is to (b) — for others. He should not be (c) — if he is full of (d) — blood. He should be (e) — to help any (f) — of man. The man whom he is helping may be (g) — to him by (h) —. But after all, he is a man. He has the (i) — blood and flesh as the above (j) — man. 

94. The Buddhist Vihara at Paharpur was (a) — in the 7th century. It is the largest (b) — Buddhist (c) — in the Indian subcontinent and is also known as the Somapura Mahavihara, the great monastery. It was (d) — intellectual centre from the 7th century until the 17th century. Its layout is (e) — adapted to its religious (f) —. This monastery-city represents a unique (g) — achievement which has (h) — Buddhist architecture as (i) — as Cambodia. It was (j) — a World Heritage Site in 1985 at the 9th session of the 21 members international committee.

95. No other word is so (a) — as the word “mother”. It is (b) — up with our existence. Everyone starts his life first (c) — the word “mother”. This word lasts to the child (d) — death. It is mother who first becomes touched (e) — our happiness and sorrows. We know about the mother of Bayazid Bostami (f) — Ishwar Chandra Vidyasagar. In every religion, the position of mother is (g) — the highest place. Our great Prophet Hazrat Muhammad (Sm.) (h) — that “Heaven is at the (i) — of mother.” So, when I think of my mother, my knees and head (j) — down.

96. When a girl gets (a) —, she usually drops out of school and begins full-time work in her in laws’ household. In the in-laws’ house, she is (b) —. She becomes (c) — to all forms of abuse, including dowry related (d) —. In Bangladesh, it is still (e) — for a bride’s family to pay dowry, (f) — the (g) — being (h) —. Dowry (i) — can also continue after the (j) —.

97. Folk music (a) — of songs and music of a community that are (b) — by any (c) — musical rules or any standard music styles. Bangladesh has a (d) — of rich folk (e) — which includes both religious and (f) — songs.  Folk music may be described as that type of ancient (g) — which springs from the heart of a (h) —, based on their (i) — style of expression uninfluenced by the rules of classical music and (j) — popular song.

98. Most of us do not know what the words ‘brain drain’ mean. The (a) — of highly trained or qualified people from a (b) — country to another country is called brain drain. Brain drain (c) — countries to lose (d) — professionals. Every year a good number of talented people are (e) — our country in (f) — of better living. This has (g) — a great impact on our economy. The country is (h) — of the services of these talented people though it (i) — a huge sum of money to educate them. There are other loses too. (j) —, necessary steps should be taken to stop this tendency.  

99. Shamsur Rahman was a Bangladeshi poet. As a poet, he was deeply (a) — in his own tradition. He built his literary (b) — against the (c) — of the 30’s poets. He developed the (d) — and added new (e) — to it. From the late sixties, he began to influence the (f) — scene. He brought new (g) — in Bangla poetry. He expressed his (h) — about people’s (i) — rights. His poems also expose moral (j) — of people.

Class 9-10, Seen Passage 1

Seen Passage 1

    1. May Day
    2. Lake Baikal
    3. The French Sculptor Fredic Auguste
    4. ‘Heritage’ is what we inherit from the past
    5. The pioneer of Bangladeshi modern
    6. In the primitive age communications
    7. Can you think of a classroom
    8. Once upon a time in Venice
    9. Bassanio went to Belmont
    10. It was late Summer
    11. Phelps is the most-decorated
    12. Traditional childhood pastimes
    13. A responsibility is a duty
    14. Zahir Raihan was one of the most
    15. To be a good citizen
    16. Pritilata was born
    17. Suppose your kids are
    18. Sohan lives in a village
    19. Countries of the world rely
    20. In a speech at the 90th Science Congress
    21. Paharpur is an important
    22. Have you ever thought of
    23. Michael Madhusudan Dutt
    24. Lake Baikal
    25. Meherjan lives in slum
    26. Mother Teresa was moved
    27. Pahela baishakh
    28. Steven Paul Jobs
    29. The Statue of Liberty
    30. To be a good citizen
    31. Zahir Raihan was one of the most
    32. 21 February
    33. 26 March, our Independence Day
    34. London Olympics
    35. long-ago-a-young-man
    36. The advantages of the Internet technology
    37. Eid is the main religious festival
    38. Humans can neither change
Class 9-10, Seen Passage 2

Seen Passage 2

Seen Passage 2

Read the following text and fill in each gap with a suitable word based on the information of the text.
Mainul Islam is a qualified farmer in Naogaon. Mr Islam was very brilliant as a student. He took his higher education from Bangladesh Agricultural University in Mymensingh. He then came back home and started advanced farming. He has two other brothers who are graduates in different disciplines. The specialty of Islam family is that they all are living in their village and all are renowned in their own fields. Mr. Islam’s younger brother, who is a Rajshahi University graduate, is a science teacher in a local school. His youngest brother is a social science graduate who likes to start a local NGO to work for this area. When asked “What makes you decide to stay here in this village?” Mr Islam smiled and said, “Look, it’s true that we could leave this village for city life. I could be banker or my brothers could be a bureaucrat. But it didn’t attract us. We are sons of this soil. Yes, we have education but does education prepare a person only to be an officer? Don’t we have any obligation to the soil that has made us what we are?” He also added that not every educated individual should be a job seeker.

1. Mainul Islam is an (a) — farmer. He had higher education from Mymensingh Agricultural University. His two other brothers are also educated. They have deep (b) — for the village. They did not go to town in quest of any (c) —. They are (d) — in their respective field. They are happy with their village life. According to them all educated (e) — should not look for job.

2. We can take the (a) — of Mainul Islam and his (b) —. They are really great people.  (c) — completing their education, they did not seek for jobs leaving their family, their village. (d) — they stayed in their village and found out their jobs there. By (e) — this, they have set a new example for others.

 

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions following it.
Highly paid and high-profile conventional job most people like. But have you ever thought of types of jobs out there……cool fun exciting even strange or weird jobs you never knew What are they? Did you ever wonder who pick up the chewing gum left on a park bench or assesses whether a piece of furniture is comfortable enough or who constructs glass eyeballs or who farms oysters in the middle of the ocean? These are all odds unexpected, wild, unconventional strange or just plain weird jobs and careers. They are not your traditional career choices, but somebody there does all these things gets paid for it, and enjoy life like anybody else There are hundreds of such jobs to take if you want to travel the less taken ways of life Decide if you want a change. A lot of strange jobs also allow you to work part-time or freelance when fits your schedule. This way you can get a taste of freedom, a secondary income, and build experience at the same time.

1. There are so many people who do not like (a) — jobs. The reason behind their avoiding those types of jobs is (b) —. They think they may not be (c) — with such types of jobs on regular basis. And it happens, their life will be at (d) —. But it is universally true that the number of people doing these types of jobs is no less than those doing conventional jobs. In fact, it depends absolutely on personal (e) —.

2. Highly paid and high profile conventional jobs are mostly expected by the people. Our choice and important decision in our life (a) — us go ahead. We have to decide first what we would like to be. We can choose traditional career like most of the people or we can choose (b) — jobs. A good number of weird jobs are (c) —. We can choose these jobs as full time job or we can choose them as part-time if they do not (d) — our working schedule. These jobs will not only give us the flavour of liberty and extra money but also give us (e) — experience.

3. We have to change our motive to (a) — for conventional jobs only. The world presents thousands of ways of caring from picking up chewing gums to (b) — trash from streets from accumulating oysters from sea shore to (c) — people with snake charming. Doing these unconventional jobs gives us much fun excitement if we do it wholeheartedly. In our country besides doing official jobs. We have ample (d) — to earn from livestock rearing, agriculture (e) — and poultry raising. One can easily engage oneself in these sector.

 

Read the following text and fill in each gap with a suitable word based on the information of the text.

Unit 14 Lesson 9: A Pound of Flesh

Once upon a time in Venice, Italy, there was a very rich merchant named Antonio. He had many ships that sailed in the sea. His ships carried different types of merchandise to other countries, He sold those goods there. He bought spices and other valuables from foreign countries and sold them in Venice. Antonio was a good and kind man. He always helped the poor. The people of Venice loved him very much for his honesty and kindness. Antonio had a close friend named Bassanio. He was a handsome young man and was born in a noble family. Bassanio liked to live a very luxurious life. He loved grandeur and style. He spent more money than he earned. As a result, he was very often short of money. In such situations, Bassanio would go to his best friend Antonio for help. Antonio would help him with cash.

It so happened that Bassanio fell in love with a wealthy lady named Portia. Portia was known not only for her beauty but also for her wisdom. She was soft towards Bassanio too. He wanted to visit Portia in a grand manner but he did not have any money. So he went to Antonio.

Question: Once there (a) — a rich merchant named Antonio. He had many business ships. He traded with foreign countries. By nature he was honest and kind. People loved him very much. He was a very (b) — friend of Bassanio. Bassanio was born in a (c) — family. He liked luxury. He was very (d) —. He was always in want of (e) —.

 

Read the following text and fill in each gap with a suitable word based on the information of the text.

Unit-14 : Lesson-10

Rossanio went to Belmont to visit Portia grandly dressed with many servants. Portia’s father had died lately. Before his death he had thought of an unusual plan to find a good husband for his Jaudhter. He wanted a man to marry Portia for herself and not for her wealth. He had three caskets made, one ol gold, one of silver and one of lead. One of the caskets had Portia’s portrait in it. The suitor, who would first choose the casket with the portrait would marry her. The first one to try was the prince of Morocco. He thought that silver and lead are poor metals. It is the casket made or precious metal that can hold the precious picture. So he chose the gold casket But all he found was a picture of a skull with a message that said, “All that glitters is not gold. The prince was very sad and went back home. Then came the prince of Spain. He looked at the silver casket for a long time. On it was written. “He who chooses me will get what he deserves.” The prince had a very high opinion about himself. He thought that he deserved the best. He therefore chose the silver casket and opened it. Inside the casket he found the picture of a blinking fool. He was very disappointed and offended. He immediately rode away. Then it was Bassanio’s turn. He looked at the caskets for a long time. He thought.” Appearances are often misleading. Bad men appear good and they hide their inner ugliness under fine clothes.” So he chose the plain looking lead casket. On opening the casket, he found the portrait of Portia inside. Bassanio and Portia got married.

Question: Portia’s father wanted that the man who would (a) — his death he made three caskets – one made of gold, another of silver and the other of lead. In one of the caskets he kept the portrait of Portia. He announced that he who would choose the (b) — of Portia would be able to marry her. First came the prince of Morocco. He thought to himself that the casket made of precious metal might contain the portrait of Portia. But he was unsuccessful in his (c) —. The prince of Spain tried his (d) — in the silver caskets but in vain. Before choosing the casket Bassanio thought for a while. He chose the (e) — casket. He opened it and found the portrait of Portia. Finally they got married.

 

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions following it.   
26 March, our Independence Day, is the biggest state festival. The day is celebrated every year in the country with great enthusiasm and fervor. It is a national holiday. All offices, educational institutions, shops and factories remain closed on this day. The day begins with 31 gunshots. Early in the morning the President and the Prime Minister on behalf of the nation place floral wreaths at the National Mausoleum at Savar. Then diplomats, political parties, social and cultural organizations, and freedom fighters pay homage to the martyrs. People from all walks of life also come there with rallies and processions. There are several cultural programs throughout the day highlighting the heroic struggle and sacrifice in 1971. The country also witness a smartly dressed parade of defense forces, border guards, police and the VDP (Village Defense Party) at the National Parade Ground near the National Parliament. In Bangabandhu Stadium, school children, scouts and girl guides take part in various displays to entertain thousands of spectators. The educational institutions also organize their individual programs. Sports meets and tournaments are also organized on the day including the exciting boat race in the river Buriganga. In the evening, all major public buildings are illuminated with colorful lights. Bangla Academy, Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy and other socio-cultural organizations hold cultural functions. Similar functions are also arranged in other places in the country.

Question: 26 March is a (a) — letter day for the people of Bangladesh. On this day, our (b) — War began. The (c) — sons of our country laid down their lives for the (d) — of the country. So, the whole nation celebrates the day every year to (e) — respect to the martyrs.

1. 26 March is a (a) — day for the people of Bangladesh. On this day, our (b) — War began. The heroic sons of our country sacrificed their (c) —. So, the whole nation (d) — the day every year to (e) — respect to the martyrs.

2. Independence Day is the biggest festival in our country. The day is observed throughout the country in a befitting (a) —. The (b) — of Independence Day begins with a 31 gun salute. People from all walks of life (c) — to the National Mausoleum to pay their respect by offering flower (d) —. Several cultural programmes are also (e) — to highlight the supreme sacrifice of our heroic sons for the independence of the country.

3. 26 March is a (a) — letter day in the history of our life. On this (b) — day in 1971 our independence was declared. People from all walks of life went to the battlefield to (c) — away our long-cherished independence. Thirty lakh people (d) — down their lives in the battlefield. Besides, two lakh women had to lose their chastity to buy our independence. Those who sacrificed their life, honour and happiness for the sake of our independence will remain ever (e) — in our heart for good.

4. 26 March is a red-letter day in our national (a) —. It is our Independence Day. This is a day to (b) —why and how Bangladesh is created. The birth of Bangladesh was not easy. Our heroic people protested (c) — the evil motive and plan of the Pakistani rulers. Conscious people of our country (d) — against Pak rulers in 1952, ’62, ’68, ’69 and finally in 1971. So 1971 was the (e) — of the previous movements.

5. The day of 26 March is observed with great respect and (a) — every year in the country. The President and Prime Minister visit the National Mausoleum at Savar to pay (b) — to the martyrs. They place (c) — of flowers there on behalf of the nation. People (d) — of caste and creed proceed with rallies and show respect to the martyrs who lost their lives in 1971. This day is a (e) — day in history.

6. March 26 is a (a) — day in the history of Bangladesh. On this day. Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, the father of the nation (b) — the independence of Bangladesh. Every year we (c) — Independence Day in a befitting (d) —. On this day the national flag is (e) — in all important places and offices.

7. The day of 26 March is observed with great (a) — and zeal every year in the country. It is a (b) —holiday. The day begins with a 31gun salute. The President and the Prime Minister visit the National Mausoleum at Savar to pay (c) — to the martyrs. They place wreaths of flowers there on behalf of the (d) —. People irrespective of caste or creed proceed with rallies and (e) — respect to the martyrs who lost their lives in 1971.

8. Our biggest state festival is Independence Day. It is observed with great solemnity every year across the (a) —. Early in the morning the President and the Prime Minister visit the National Mausoleum at Savar to pay homage to the (b) —. They place (c) — of flowers there on behalf of the nation. People from all castes and (d) — proceed with rallies and show respect to the martyrs who sacrificed their lives in 1971. This day is a memorable day in the (e) — of Bangladesh.

 

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions following it. 
The pioneer of Bangladeshi modern art Zainul Abedin is widely acclaimed for his Bengal ‘Famine Sketches’. Through a series of sketches, Zainul not only documented the harsh famine of 1940 but also showed its sinister face through the skeletal figures of the people destined to die of starvation in a man-made plight. He depicted these extremely shocking pictures with human compassion. He made his own ink by burning charcoal and using cheap ordinary packing paper for sketching. He produced a series of brush and ink drawings, which later became iconic images of human sufferings.

Zainul developed a knack for drawing and painting when he was a high school student. After completing high school, he got admission to the Government School of Art, Calcutta (now Kolkata). He graduated with the first position in first class in 1938. He was appointed teacher of the Art School while he was still a student there. He also attended the Slade School of Arts, London in 1951-52.

Zainul Abedin is considered the founding father of Bangladeshi art. He was an artist of outstanding talent and earned international reputation. For his artistic and visionary qualities, he is referred to as Shilpacharya meaning ‘great teacher of art’ in Bangladesh. He was the first Principal of the first art school in Dhaka in East Pakistan (now Bangladesh). He organized the Nabanna (harvest) exhibition in 1969. In the exhibition, a 65-foot long scroll portraying the rural East Pakistan in phases from abundance to poverty. This intensified the already heightened non-cooperation movement against the Pakistan regime. The exhibition was symbolic of the artists protest and a milestone in demanding cultural and political freedom. Zainul’s dynamic style of work is evident in a 30 foot long scroll painting called Manpura, which was done to commemorate the death of hundreds and thousands of people in the devastating cyclone of 1970.

He designed the pages of Constitution of Bangladesh. He founded the Folk Art Museum at Sonargoan, and also Zainul Abedin Shangrahasala, a gallery of his own works in Mymensingh in 1975.

The river Brahmaputra plays a predominant role in his paintings and a source of inspiration all through his career. Much of his childhood was spent near the scenic beauty of the river Brahmaputra. A series of water colours that Zainul did as his tribute to the river earned him the Governor’s Gold Medal in an all-India exhibition in 1938. This was the first time when he came into spotlight and this award gave him the confidence to create his own visual style.

Zainul was born in Kishoreganj on 29 December 1914, and died on 28 May, 1976.

Question:

1. Zainul is our (a)—. His Bengal `Famine Sketches’ were admired (b)—. He not only documented the harsh famine of 1940 (c)—showed its sinister face through the skeletal figures of the people (d)—were destined to die of starvation.

2. Zainul’s pictures were (e)—pathetic, During his school life, he (f)—a skill on drawing and (g)—. He (h)—from the Govt. School of Art in Calcutta. He got first class in (i)—. He also attended the Slade School of Arts in (j)—.

3. Zainul Abedin (a)—the sufferings of the (b)—of Bangladesh. He painted the (c) —figures of (d)—people in the great (e) —of (f)—. In (g)—thousands of people (h)—in the devastating cyclone. His famous (i)—’Manpura’ has showed this (j)—scene.

4. Zainul Abedin had (a) — potentiality to become (b) — artist. His knack coincided with his (c) — as he graduated from an art school. He depicted both (d) — and (e) — in his artworks.

5. Zainul Abedin had (a) — potentiality to become an artist. He is the pioneer of Bangladeshi art. He loved nature and art from his (b) —. He showed his artistic and visionary qualities in his student life. Graduating, (c) — credit, he served as a teacher for many years. He showed his talent in different sketches. In his different sketches, (d), — sketches were acclaimed both nationally and internationally. He is also famous for designing the pages of constitution and (e) — the Folk Art Museum.

6. Zainul Abedin had (a) — potentiality to become an artist. He is the pioneer of Bangladeshi art. He was a (b) — student. He was from Kishoreganj. Graduating (c) — credit, he served as a teacher for many years. He showed his talent in his different sketches (d) — were acclaimed both nationally and internationally. He is also famous for designing the pages of Constitution and (e) — the Folk Art Museum.

7. There is hardly any person (a) — has not heard the name of Zainul Abedin. He was a brilliant student. He got himself (b) — into the government school of Art in Kolkata. He took his graduation in 1938 from there and (c) — first class first. From his school life, he had a great knack for art. He is the (d) — of Bangladeshi modern art. His “Famine sketch” of Bengal in 1940 has earned him much (e) —.

8. Zainul Abedin is considered the (a) — father of Bangladeshi art. He had an outstanding talent and earned international (b) —. He is referred to as a great teacher of art’ in Bangladesh for his artistic and visionary qualities. His style of work is (c) — which is evident in a 30-foot long scroll painting called Manpura. He (d) — this painting to commemorate the death of the people who (e) — in the devastating cyclone of 1970.

9. Zainul Abedin is the (a) — of Bangladeshi modern art. He is well-known to the world for his “Famine Sketches’. In his sketches, he (b) — the cruel famine of 1940. After completing high school, he went to Kolkata and got admitted into the Government School of Art there. He received his graduation in art in 1938. Then he joined there as a teacher. For his (c) — qualities, he was given the title of (d) — He showed his protest against the Pakistan regime by painting scroll of (e) —. 

10. Zainul Abedin had (a) — potentiality to become an artist. He is the pioneer of Bangladeshi art. He loved nature and art from his (b) —. He showed his artistic and visionary qualities in his student life. Graduating (c) — credit, he served as a teacher for many years. He showed his talent in different sketches. Of his different sketches, (d) — Sketches were acclaimed both nationally and internationally. He is also famous for designing the pages of constitution and (e) — the Folk Art Museum.

 

Read the following passage to answer the question number 3
Meherjan lives in a slum on the Sirajgonj Town Protection Embankment. Her polythene roofed shelter looks like a cage. She is nearly 45 but looks more than her age. In front of her shelter, she is trying to make a fire to cook the day’s only meal. Her weak hands tremble as she adds some fallen leaves and straw to the fire. The whispering wind from the river Jamuna makes the fire unsteady. The dancing of the flames reminds Meherjan of the turmoil in her life. Not long ago Meherjan had everything — a family, cultivable land and cattle. The erosion of the Jamuna consumed gradually all her landed property. It finally claimed her last shelter during the last monsoon. It took the river only a day to demolish Meher’s house, trees, vegetable garden and the bamboo bush. She had a happy family once. Over the years, she lost her husband and her family to diseases that cruel hunger and poverty brought to the family. Now, she is the only one left to live on with the loss and the pain. The greedy Jamuna has shattered her dreams and happiness. There are thousand others waiting to share the same fate with Meherjan. Bangladesh is a land of rivers that affect its people. Erosion is a harsh reality for the people living along the river banks. During each monsoon many more villages are threatened by the roaring of rivers like the Jamuna, the Padma and the Meghna. It is estimated that river erosion makes at least 100,000 people homeless every year in Bangladesh. In fact, river erosion is one of the main dangers caused by climate change. If we can’t take prompt actions to adapt to climate change, there will be thousands of more Meherjans in our towns and villages every year.

Question: Meherjan, a homeless woman, lives in a (a) — on the Sirajgonj Town Protection Embankment. She lost her shelter and properties (b) — of the erosion of the Jamuna. Her husband died of diseases caused by poverty and (c) —. River erosion is still (d) — threats to the lives and properties of thousands of people. Meherjan’s life is only an example of the (e) — of climate change in our country.

1. Meherian is a (a) — homeless woman who lives in a slum. She lost her shelter and properties (b) — to the erosion of river Jamuna. She also lost her family. Her husband had died diseases caused by poverty and (c) — of food. Now, she is only a slum (d) —. Like Meherjan there are many people who have become the (e) — of river erosion.

2. River erosion is a serious problem in Bangladesh. Erosion makes people (a) —. People have to take shelter on embankments and other places. Meherjan is one of the (b) — victims of river erosion. She once had everything. The greedy Jamuna has (c) — all her properties and shattered her dreams. Many people have the (d) — fate like Meherjan. During monsoon many villagers lose everything by the (e) — rivers every year.

3. River erosion is caused by (a) — change. It is a severe threat for the people (b) —, along the river banks. Every year it makes thousands of people (c) — Meherjan is a (d) — of this disaster. She has lost everything because of the greed of the river and now (e) — a very unhappy life.

4. River erosion is still posing (a) — to the lives and properties of thousands of people. People living (b) — the rivers are the most likely victims of river erosion. Each year many people become (c) — due to river erosion in Bangladesh. Meherjan’s life is just one (d) — of how climate change (e) — the lives of thousands of people.

5. Meherjan is a woman of about 45 who lives (a) — in a slum in Sirajgonj. She is leading a very miserable life (b) — her family and property she had previously. All her property and (c) — were grabbed by the erosion of the river Jamuna. Her husband and other family members (d) — to die of several diseases caused from hunger and poverty. So now she is to struggle alone just to keep body and (e) — together.

6. Meherjan is a (a) — of river erosion. But she had (b) — a lofty dream to lead a happy (c) — life. Due to her ill-luck, the river Jamuna (d) — her hopes and aspirations. Now, she lives in a slum. River erosion has (e) — away her all riches and properties. All her past memories prick her all the time.

7. Meherjan is a woman of (a) — now living in a slum in Sirajganj. She has a (b) — experience about the river Jamuna. The erosion of this river (c) — every of her property including a trees, shelter, etc. She also lost her husband for (d) — of food. The greedy Jamuna causes to live on (e) — no dream and happiness. Dangladesh is a riverine country.

8. So, river erosion is a (a) — phenomenon in our country at makes thousands of people homeless and (b) —. Meherian is a (c) — Of this disaster. She is the (d) — sufferer of the river erosion and is struggling hard to (e) — with it.

 

Read the following text and fill in each gap with a suitable word based on the information of the text
Pahela Boishakh is the first day of Bangla Nwe Year. The day is a public holiday. This day has a special significance for us as it is a part of Bangalee culture and tradition. People from all walks of life celebrate the day with traditional festivities. On this day, the whole of Bangladesh is in a festive mood. The day inspires people to start life with renewed hopes and inspirations.

Every year the day is celebrated traditionally. People wake up early in the morning, have a bath ane wear their traditional clothes. It is a day when people love eating traditional food.

One of the most colourful events of the day is held in Dhaka. Early in the morning, frm all directions to attend the cultural function at Ramna Batamul orgamised by Chhyanata. The cultural programme begins just at sunrise and the renowned artists of the country take part in the programme that starts with Tagore-song Esho-he-Boishakh, Esho Esho…

Question: The first day of Bangla New. Year is (a) — as Pahela Boishakh;. Since the day (b) — Bangalee culture and tradition, it has a special significance for us. On this day, the whole Bangladesh wears a festive mood. The day inspires us to start our life with renewed hopes and inspirations. Every year, we (c) — the day with traditional festivities. We wake up early in the morning and eat/take traditional food. The first cultural programme at Ramna Batamul organised by Chhyanata (d) —  just at the time of sunrise and the renowned artists of the country (e) — in it.

1. Pahela Boishakh represents our ethnic (a) —. On this day, we (b) — to start life afresh with new hopes and (c) —. The day is spent in pomp and ecstasy. We wear (d) — dresses and enjoy traditional food. The entire country wears a (e) — look.

2.The first day of Bangla New Year is known (a) — Pahela Boishakh. Since the day (b) — Bangalee culture and tradition, it has a special significance for us. On this day, the whole Bangladesh wears a festive mood. The day inspires us to start our life with renewed hopes and inspirations. Every year, we (c) — the day with traditional festivities. We wake up early in the morning and (d) — the programmes of Pahela Boishakh (e) — traditional clothes.

3. Pahela Boishakh is a traditional (a) — that is celebrated all over the country every year. It (b) — people to begin a new (c) — with new expectations. Everyone wears (d) — clothes and eats traditional food on this day. Different organizations arrange different (e) — programmes throughout the country.

 

Read the following text and fill in each gap with a suitable word based on the information of the text.
May Day or International Workers Day is observed on May 1 all over the world to commemorate the historical struggle and sacrifices of the working people to establish an eight-hour workday. It is a public holiday in almost all the countries of the world. Since the Industrial Revolution in the 18th and 19th centuries in Europe and the US, the workers in mills and factories had been working a long shift, fourteen or even more hours a day.

On May 1st in 1886, inspired by the trade unions, half of the workers at the McCormic Harvester Company in Chicago went on strike demanding an eight-hour workday. Two days later, a workers’ rally was held near the McCormic Hervester Company and about 6000 workers had joined it. The rally was addressed by the labour leaders. They urged the workers to stand together, to go on with their struggle and not to give in to their bosses. Just at this moment some strikebreakers started leaving the meeting place. The strikers went down the street to bring them back. Suddenly about 200 policemen attacked them with clubs and revolvers. One striker was killed instantly, five or six others were seriously wounded and many of them were badly injured.

The events of May 1, 1886 is a reminder that workers will continue to be exploited until they stand up and speak out to gain better working conditions, better pay and better lives.

Question: May Day is a memorable day for the people all over the world. The day is (a) — as a public holiday in almost all the countries. In old days, the (b) — in mills and factories had to work a long shift, fourteen or even more hours a day. Mc Comic Hervester Company in Chicago was the (c) — place of this movement. Workers of all class including their leaders played significant role to come out (d) — on the demand of eight hours working day. They treated their lives less vital then their demand. Their sacrifice has ensured the scope for the working people all over the universe to stand up with honour and dignity, better working condition, better (e) —  and standard form of life to lead.

Answers : (a) regarded (b) workers (c) origination (d) victorious  (e) payment

1. International (a) — Day is a memorable day in the history of the world. It is a (b) — holiday in almost all the countries of the world. The (c) — of May 1st, 1886 is a (d) — that workers will continue to be (e) — until they stand up and speak out to gain their rights.

2. May Day has a heart (a) — history. On this day in 1886, one worker was killed and some others were (b) — wounded by the attack of police. It was a (c) — rally of the stickers who had some definite demands. The rally was organized by the (d) —. There were some (e) — who tried to leave the rally and strike before the police attacked.

3. May 1st, International Workers Day is recognized as a day of victory. The workers (a) — against their employers for establishing their rights. The labourers wanted to get their (b) — wage. On this day police (c) — at many workers to (d) — it. It caused the death of a striker. Many of them also received (e) — injuries.

4. The world observes the May Day after a long struggle and great (a) —. For this memorable struggle workers now can enjoy an eight-hour workday. May 1st has been (b) — as a public holiday in (c) — all the countries of the world. The workers had to work (d) — hours or more a day before the May 1st (e) —.

5. May Day reminds the struggle and sacrifice of the workers against exploitation and deprivation. Because prior to May 1st, 1886 workers had to work 10 to 16 hours a day in very unsafe (a) —. They were often (b) — of death and injury. As a result, they protested against those maltreatments (c) —. They went on a (d) — and assembled in a rally. Police fired on the crowd of workers, killed one on the spot and left many wounded and injured. But ultimately, the workers succeeded in getting their demands (e) —.

6. May 1st, International Workers’ Day is recognized as a day of victory. In order to establish their rights, the workers (a) — against the factory owners. It was a struggle between the employees and the (b) —. The workers wanted to get (c) — by the factory owners. But many of them were (d) — dead. It was a (e) — no doubt.

 

Humans can neither change the sun’s radiation nor the earth’s orbit around the sun. But they can control the increase in the amount of greenhouse gases and its effect on the atmosphere. Only during the last hundred years the carbon dioxide concentration has been raised alarmingly in the atmosphere and we humans can be held responsible for this. The main cause of the increase in carbon dioxide level in the atmosphere is the burning of fossil fuels. Since the end of the 19th century, industrial activities increased rapidly giving rise to many factories. These factories required energy, which was produced through the combustion of coal. Besides coal, other sources of energy such as mineral oil and natural gas were also burned to heat our houses, run cars and airplanes or to produce electricity. Nowadays, about 85 million barrels of crude oil are burned daily. Every time a fossil raw material is burned, it releases carbon dioxide into the air. Therefore, it is clear that more and more greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide are being generated worldwide by humans. Moreover, we are also strengthening the greenhouse effect by deforestation, which means cutting down trees. Every year enormous areas of forests are destroyed by people to obtain wood and to clear regions for mining and to create pasture. This loss of the forest causes dual problems. Trees that are burned up release large volumes of carbon dioxide gas into the air. On the other hand, as forests absorb a lot of carbon dioxide from the air and deliver oxygen instead, we also destroy an important storehouse of carbon dioxide when we clear forests.
1. Humans are (a) — for the increasing amount of greenhouse gases and its effect on the (b) —. Coal, mineral oil and gas are burned to get (c) —. But all these things being burnt release carbon dioxide into the air. Moreover, people cut the forests (d) — absorb carbon dioxide and supply (e) —.

2. It is true that most of the natural phenomena are beyond humans’ control, yet he can (a) — some aspects like the greenhouse effect by his wise activities. Carbon dioxide is the main (b) — of it. Carbon dioxide is being (c) — in the atmosphere by the burning of fossil fuels. In fact, industrial activities have given rise many factories where coal is (d) — for energy. Moreover, mineral oil and natural gas are also used for various (e) —.

3. There are several reasons why the carbon dioxide concentration has been (a) — in the atmosphere. Our mills and factories burn coal, mineral oil, natural gas, etc. with a view to (b) — energy, we also burn these materials to (c) — our everyday needs. But for our own safety, we have to encourage (d) —. Otherwise, our existence on earth will be at (e) —.

4. The concentration of carbon dioxide is the main reason of greenhouse effect. This carbon dioxide is mainly (a) — from the burning of fossil fuels. Indeed, burning coal emits the (b) — amount of CO2 in the industries. Apart from these, (c) — is another reason of greenhouse effect. This loss causes (d) — crisis. That is, we are strengthening the carbon dioxide concentration and (e) — the oxygen absorption by deforestation.

5. Climate change has become a great (a) — for us in our country as well as in the world. We are highly responsible for (b) — climate change. It is one of the causes of greenhouse gases and its effect on the atmosphere is very (c) — Again, we can say that the main cause of increasing carbon dioxide level in the atmosphere is the burning of fossil fuels. In this modern age, more and more greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide are being generated worldwide by (d) —. Deforestation causes serious greenhouse effect which also causes global warming. So, air pollution must be (e) — at any rate.

6. Humans are unable to change the (a) — of the sun. To change the earth’s orbit around the (b) — is also impossible. But humans can control the (c) — of greenhouse gases on the atmosphere. The (d) — cause of increasing carbon dioxide level in the atmosphere is the burning of (e) — fuels.

7. Man has no capability to change the sun’s radiation or the earth orbit around the (a) —. But he can control the increase in the amount of greenhouse (b) — and its effect on the atmosphere. Man is (c) —for the rise in carbon dioxide. The burning of fossil fuels is the main cause of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Various kinds of fuels like coal, mineral oil and natural gas are burnt for various (d) —which release carbon dioxide into the air. So, it is clear that (e) — are generating more and more greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide.

8. Human beings are (a) — responsible for climate change. They are (b) — the environment by (c) — greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, CFC etc. Combustion of coal, burning of fossil fuels, deforestation are the (d) — causes of pollution. Climate change (e) — natural disasters.

 

“Today there are many jobs where you need English. This is because the world has become smaller. Vast distances are shortened by speedy transport. We can talk to a person thousands of kilometres away on the phone or the Internet. So we can communicate with the whole world easily. English has made this communication easier.

There are many countries in the world with many languages, but to communicate with them, you cannot speak all the languages. So you need a common language that you can use with more or less all the people in the world. English is that common language. You can talk to a Chinese toy maker, a French artist, an Arab ambassador or a Korean builder in one language —English.

English for us in Bangladesh is all the more important. As we have seen earlier, we are too many people in a small country. So if you learn English, you have the best opportunity to find a good job, both within and outside the country. And that is good news for millions of our unemployed youths.

We should learn how to use English both orally and in writing for doing things as needed in our work, such as communicating with others at personal, social, national and international levels. But unfortunately, at the moment we are learning English mainly for our exams. English can greatly help you become skilled workforce.

1. It is very (a) — for everyone to learn English nowadays. If we want to (b) — there is no (c) — with other countries. to learn English. By learning English both orally and in writing, we can easily (d) — our unemployment problem in our country. From the very beginning, a student should think that he has to learn English not only for passing the exams but also to communicate with others and it is a (e) —.

2. Globalization has made the world smaller and so it requires a (a) — language for international communication. The lingua franca of the world is (b) —. English provides us with the (c) — to pursue a good job. Being a densely (d) — country, Bangladesh is cursed with unemployment. Proficiency in English may help (e) — unemployment problem and bring economic development.

3. A common language is necessary for (a) — communication. For many (b) — English has achieved the prestige of being that language. It helps to get good jobs and (c) — better salaries. It can help us communicate with others. So we all should learn English for the improvement of our (d) — career. It also helps (e) — our unemployment problem.

4.The present world has now become smaller because (a) — transports help us (b) — the vast distances. We can talk within seconds on the phone or the Internet. But the language we need to communicate is English. English is now regarded as a (c) — language. In Bangladesh, the importance of English is never (d) —. Because English also helps us find a good job besides communicating with many countries. It is of course the good news for millions of our unemployed (e) —.

5. The world is becoming smaller day by day. Now, we can (a) — communication with a person thousands of kilometres away on the phone or the Internet. In fact, we can communicate with the whole world at absolute (b) — ease. English has made this communication much easier. There are many countries in the world with many languages. But to keep in (c) — with them, we need a common language. English is that common language, no doubt. So by (d) — English, we can have the best opportunity to find a good job, both within and outside the country. And that is (e) — good news for millions of our unemployed youths.

 

A responsibility is a duty or an obligation TO DO something. For example, you have the responsibility to take care of your parents in their old age, to attend school and pursue your studies properly and so on. You have also the responsibility to society and the government, e.g. to help a neighbour in trouble or to cast your vote if you are 18 or over.

A responsibility is also an obligation or a duty NOT TO DO something. For example, you have the responsibility not to steal a book from a public library or not to put your building materials on the footpath. These are your responsibilities as citizens. But there are responsibilities of the government as well. Our government has the responsibilities to provide for its citizens “the basic necessities of life, including food, clothing, shelter, education and medical care”. The government also has the responsibilities to protect the fundamental rights of its citizens to freedom of speech and expression, freedom of the press, freedom of religion, equality of all before law2 etc.

The knowledge, skills and attitudes you have gained at home, at school and in society will help you to accept your responsibilities and to carry them out effectively. Remember, discharging your responsibilities will be good for you, good for your family and friends, and good for your society and country as a whole.

1. A duty TO DO something or NOT TO DO something (a) — to responsibility. A (b) — has to perform some responsibilities to his family and friends, to society and the government. (c) — government has to provide its citizens with the basic necessities of life. It also (d) — the fundamental rights of citizens. A citizen’s performing responsibilities will be (e) — to all in a country.

2. It is unbelievable that a nation consists of people having (a) — thoughts and ideas, a single religious (b) — or a single language. People belong to different castes and (c) —. So, it is the responsibility of each and every citizen to (a) — respect to others thoughts, faiths, customs, way of life and so forth. He/She is expected to do what he/she should do and (e) — from doing what he/she should not do.

3. Is it important to do certain things if you really want to be a good (a) —. What are your (b) — as a student? Of course, as a student your main (c) — is to study well. You have other duties as well. If your parents are (d) —, you must take care of them. You have also duties to the community or the (e) — where you are living.

4. A responsibility (a) — to an obligation both to do something and not to do something. (b) — care of our parents in their old age and pursuing our studies properly are two instances of our responsibilities. We also have duty to society and the (c) —. Helping a neighbour in (d) — is an example of our duty to society while casting vote if we are 18 or over is an example of our (e) — to the government.

5. Man is the best creation of Allah. They have some responsibilities as a (a) — being. For example, they have the responsibility to take care of their (b) — and old persons. To (c) — their neighbours is another duty and to cast their vote if they are 18 or (d) —. Actually a responsibility is their (e) — duty. 6. A responsibility refers to a duty to do something. A person has the responsibility to his family, society and the country at (a) —. A responsibility is but a kind of (b) — to do something and not to do something. The government has the responsibility to (c) — the basic rights of its citizens. One needs to attain (d) — skill and attitude to carry out one’s responsibility. Besides one’s responsibility will be good for all (e) — to one’s life. Therefore, we all should be conscious of our peaceful society.

7. We live in society. So, we have some responsibilities to the society. That means we have some (a) — to do or not to do something. We should help a (b) — in trouble. On the contrary, we should not pile up building materials on footpath since that may (c) — problem for others. Government also has some responsibilities to us such as (d) the basic necessities of life. We can (e) — about our responsibilities at home, at school or in society and try to carry them out effectively.

8. As a citizen of a country, you have a lot of duties and responsibilities. You cannot (a) — them as an ideal citizen. You ought to look after your parents when they grow old. You ought not to keep your construction (b) — on the road. Because it (c) — the way of vehicles or passer-by. You should bear in mind that every man has the same rights as you have. And as a student, you must attend the class daily. Your only task at this stage is to (d) — on your study. In return government will also work for your rights and (e) —.

 

Mother Teresa was moved by the presence of the sick and dying on the streets of Kolkata. She founded the home for the dying destitute and named it ‘Nirmal Hridoy’ meaning ‘Pure Heart’. She and her fellow nuns gathered the dying people off the streets of Kolkata and brought them to this home. They were lovingly looked after and cared for. Since then men, women and children have been taken from the streets and carried to Nirmal Hridoy. These unloved and uncared for people get an opportunity to die in an environment of kindness and love. In their last hours they get human and Divine love and can feel they are also children of God. Those who survive, the Missionaries of Charity try to find jobs for them or send them to homes where they can live happily for some more years in a caring environment. Regarding commitment to family, Mother Teresa said, ‘May be in our own family, we have somebody, who is feeling lonely, who is feeling sick, who is feeling worried. Are we there? Are we willing to give until it hurts in order to be with our families, or do we put our interest first? We must remember that love begins at home and we must also remember that future of humanity passes through the family.’

Mother Teresa’s work has been recogniged throughout the world and she has received a number of awards. These include the Pope John XXIII Peace Prize (1971), the Nehru Prize for Promotion of International Peace & Understanding (1972), the Balzan Prize (1978), the Nobel Peace Prize (1979) and the Bharat Ratna (1980). Mother Teresa died at the age of 87, on 5 September, 1997. The world salutes her for her love and compassion for humanity. She has taught us how to extend our hand towards those who need our love and support irrespective of creed, caste and religion. Draped in a white and blue bordered sari, wrinkled face, ever soft eyes and a saintly smile, is the picture of Mother Teresa in our mind.

1. Mother Teresa is still alive in our (a) — though she expired almost 16 years back. She spent her entire life for the (b) — of the poor people. She has taught us that helping the needy is the greatest work that a man can do. She lived a very poor life (c) — the poorest (d) — all pleasure and comfort. She loved all people irrespective of caste, creed and religion. That’s why she has become (e) — to all people of the world.

2. Mother Teresa was greatly shocked (a) — a large number of helpless people on the streets of Kolkata. She and her fellow nuns collected those people who were at the point of (b) — and placed them in her home. Throughout her life, she not only nursed a large number of sick people but also (c) — jobs for them. As recognition to her incomparable (d) — to mankind she was (e) — by different organizations.

3. Mother Teresa became (a) — to see the presence of the sick and dying on the streets of Kolkata. So she played a great role in (b) — Nirmal Hridoy in Kolkata. People who were brought to the home received medical (c) — from the Missionaries of Charity. They were given the opportunity to die (d) — dignity and love. The (e) — works of Mother Teresa and her fellow sisters will always be remembered.

4. Mother Teresa was the (a) — of the sick and dying destitute. By (b) — Nirmal Hridoy, she and her fellow nuns served the people. They used to (c) — the dying people to Nirmal Hridoy and look after them with (d) — and care. They made the people feel that they will get an opportunity to die in an environment of kindness and (e) —.

5. Mother Teresa was (a) — to see the sick and dying people lying on the street. She then decided to do something for these (b) — people. So, she established Nirmal Hridoy’ a home for the dying people. She brought these sick people to the home to take care and give (c) —. The whole world has (d) — her work. She has worked to (e) — peace in society and for this she has been awarded the Nobel Prize for peace.

6. The (a) — condition of the sick and dying people in the streets of Kolkata stirred Mother Teresa. In order to serve the dying helpless people, she (b) — Nirmal Hridoy. She along with her fellow nuns would (c) — the sick and dying people from the streets of Kolkata and bring them to Nirmal Hridoy. They took care of them with great love and (d) —. Mother Teresa stands for the distressed humanity. She is a (e) — of love and kindness. For her outstanding service for humanity, she was awarded Nobel Prize.

 

Fish population is in serious danger from global warming. Climate change is increasing the water temperature in rivers, lakes and seas. This means there is less food and oxygen available for fish. It also means the fish may not grow fully and may have fewer offspring. Some fishes will become extinct if temperatures rise even by one or two degrees.

Climate change increases the pressure on fish population. Fishes are one of the world’s most valuable biological assets. Forty percent of people in the world eat fish as their main source of protein. If we fail to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, we will increase the pressures on fish. As a result, people who depend on fish will suffer from hunger and poverty.

1. The temperature rise of water in rivers, lakes and seas has (a) — in the scarcity of food and oxygen for fish. As a result, the (b) — and reproduction of fishes is being hampered. If temperature rise goes on in this rate, it will cause the (c) — of some fishes. If this happens, people (d) — on fish as the main source of protein will suffer a lot. A possible solution to this problem is the (e) — of greenhouse gas emission.

2. There is no denying the fact that almost half of the world’s population depends on fish. It supplies their (a) — for protein. A large number of people also earn their (b) — by fishing. But global warming is (c) — this biological asset. As a result, people depending on fish will suffer from hunger and poverty. So, it is high time we (d) — the greenhouse gas emissions to (e) — the fish population from extinction. 3. Global warming (a) — the rise of temperature of water sources too. This sudden rise in temperature (b) — upon the fish population seriously. Increased temperature (c) — the amount of oxygen and food of the fish population. Some species of fishes are about to be (d) —. If this (e) — people dependent on fish will face hunger and poverty.

4. Fish population is not free from the (a) — of climate change. Because of climate change the water temperature will increase causing the (b) — of food and oxygen for fish. As a consequence of this, fishes will lose their (c) — capacity. Some of the fishes are on the (d) — of extinction. This (e) — increases the pressure on fish population.

5. It is (a) — from the passage that global warming is (b) — a great threat for fish population. (c) — to global warming, food production and oxygen (d) — in water decreases. As a result, some fish may be extinct (e) —.

6. A survey shows that a major number of people are entirely (a) — on fish as it is the (b) — source of protein. But this species of creature is severely affected by global (c) —. Fishes are one of the world’s most valuable (d) — assets. In case of a failure to preserve fish from greenhouse effect, the people dependent on fish are sure to suffer from (e) — and poverty.

7. Fish is one of the most (a) — assets. Many people of the world eat fish as the main source of (b) — Many people also earn their livelihood by fishing. But they are not free from (c) —. Global warming is the main reason for their extinction. Climate change bears a great (d) — their lives. If global warming cannot be (e) — the full growth of fish will be hindered.

8. Global warming is posing a great (a) — to fish population. It makes water temperature (b) —. So, fishes cannot get enough food and oxygen for their (c) —. As a result, fish population is on the (d) —state. Global warming must be checked. Otherwise, there will be a lot of (e) — fish population.

9. Fish population is severely affected (a) — to global warming. For want of food and oxygen some (b) — of fish may be (c) — one day. To stop, global warming. we have to convince people not to (d) —greenhouse gas. Otherwise, many people have to (e) — poverty and hunger.

 

The advantages of the Internet technology have made it possible to emerge a good number of web sites to facilitate social relations among people around the world. These are known as social networking services or social networks. At present, Facebook is the most popular. Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc. are other frequently used social services. Social network services are web-based and hence, provide ways for the users to interact through the Internet. These services make it possible to connect people sharing interests and activities across the borders and thus have made a lot for the users to feel that they really live in a global village. Why are social networks expanding so fast? The answer is simple. Most of the social l services are cost free. You can make use of them free, paying a very little to your Internet service provider. Secondly, you can make your personal profile public before the entire online community. It is like presenting yourself before the entire world. You can also look into other people’s profile if you are interested. It is simple and easy. Thirdly, social networks allow users to upload pictures, multimedia contents and modify the profile. Some like Facebook allow users to update their profiles. Fourthly, networks allow users to post blog entries. User profiles have a section dedicated to comments from friends and other users. Finally, there are privacy protection measures too. A user himself or herself decides over the number of visitors/viewers, and what information should be shared with others.
1. With the advancement of Internet technology, it (a) — to develop a lot of websites. These websites (b) — social networking services or social networks. These websites (c) — to promote relations among people around the world. By using these websites we can (d) — ourselves making our personal profile public before the online users. We can also know about other people’s profile and make a (e) — of friends.

2. The Internet technology has helped develop a lot of websites. These websites contribute to (a) — relations among people around the world. There are many (b) — network services. Among them (c) — is most popular. The users of Facebook can interact with people all over the world. They can exchange views, opinions and interests. Thus the social services have made the world (d) —. One can make (e) — on Facebook and can upload photos and documents.

4. The Internet technology has helped to (a) — a lot of websites. These websites help to develop relation (b) — people around the world. There exist many social networks services. Among them (c) — is the most popular. The users of Facebook can enjoy some facilities which help people around the world to (d) — their feeling and exchange their ideas and views. Anyone can enjoy these facilities living anywhere in the world but it is (e) —.

5. With the help of Internet (a) — a large number of websites are designed. These sites (b) — social relations among people all over the world. Providing a lots of functions social network services are going forward connecting people across the (c) —. People from whole world can (d) — their interests and activities with each other and (e) — closed as they are living in a global village.

6. The passage (a) — with the social network services. Social network services work for making social relations among people (b) — the world. The users can (c) — through the services. These services make it possible to connect people (d) — interests and activities across the borders. Because most of the social services are cost (e) —.

 

21 February has been observed as Shaheed Dibosh every year throughout the country in remembrance of the martyrs of language movement of 1952. The occasion begins at the early hours of the day with mourning songs that recall the supreme sacrifices of our language martyrs. People wear black badges and go to the Shaheed Minar barefoot in procession, singing mourning songs. They place wreaths at the Minar.

Many of them visit the graves of the martyrs at Azimpur graveyard and pray for them. They also attend various programmes organised in remembrance of the language martyrs. The UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation) on 17 November in 1999 proclaimed February 21 as the International Mother Language Day in recognition of the sacrifices of the martyrs for the rightful place of Bangla. The day is now annually observed worldwide to promote awareness of linguistic and cultural diversity and multilingualism.

1. The then Pakistani rulers tried to impose Urdu as mother (a) — upon us instead of Bengali. But our heroic sons raised their voice (b) — this unlawful decision. Some of the heroic sons came forward and (c) — their lives for the cause of our language on 21 February 1952. Since then the day has been (d) — Shaheed Dibosh. Every year we remember this day with solemnity and pay profound (e) — to the martyrs.

2. People across the country observe 21 February to remember the (a) — martyrs. They organize various (b) — to celebrate the day. At dawn they, putting on black badges, attend the (c) — barefoot and sing mourning songs which remind them of the (d) — sacrifice of the martyrs. The Shaheed Minar gets flooded with the (e) — of flowers.

3. 21 February is (a) — as the International Mother Language Day not only in Bangladesh, but also worldwide. We (b) — this day as Shaheed Dibosh every year. The people of Bangladesh observe the day with (c) — songs to (d) — respect to the martyrs. They go to the Shaheed Minar (e) — wearing black badges.

4. 21 February is a memorable day in our national (a) —. We observe the day every year as the

International Mother Language Day. The day is a national (b) —. On this day. we pay tribute to the martyrs who (c) — their lives to establish Bangla as a state language in undivided Pakistan in 1952. In fact, the seed of the Language Movement was (d) — on 21 March 1948 when Mohammad Ali Jinnah (e) — that Urdu would be the only state language of Pakistan.

5. People (a) — 21 February as Shaheed Dibosh every year throughout the country to remember the memory of the martyrs of the Language Movement of 1952. People get up early in the morning. They walk (b) — to the Shaheed Minar. (c) — black badges they go to the Shaheed Minar singing the mourning song ‘Amar Bhaier Rokte Rangano ….. They (d) — homage to the memory of the martyrs. They offer flowers at Shaheed Minar to show their profound (e) —.

6. (a) — Martyrs are remembered by the people across the country and (b) — as Shaheed Dibosh. They organize various (c) — to celebrate the day. At (d) — they. putting on black badges, attend the (e) — barefooted and sing mourning songs.

 

Zahir Raihan was one of the most talented film makers in Bangladesh. He was born on 19 August 1935 in the village Majupur, in Feni district. He was an active worker of the Language Movement. He was one of the ten students to go out in a procession on 21 February 1952 despite a ban on such activities. As a result, he and many others were arrested and taken to prison. Zahir was also present at the historical meeting of Amtala on February 21, 1952. He also took part in the mass movement in 1969. In 1971, he joined the Liberation War.

All through his life, Zahir dreamt for a democratic society, a society that will ensure freedom of speech and will. He had many dreams about our film industry too. He made a legendary film Jibon Theke Neya based on the Language Movement of 1952. It was a revolt against the then autocratic government. The family presented in that film was a miniature East Pakistan ruled by an autocrat who had to go to the prison for her conspiracy. During the liberation war this film was shown outside Bangladesh. Critics like Satyajit Ray, Mrinal Sen, and Ritwik Ghatak appreciated this film. Zahir gave all his money to the Freedom Fighters’ trust that he got from his film shows. Besides, his great documentary on Pakistani atrocities, Stop Genocide, helped create world sentiment in favour of our liberation war. On 30 December 1971, someone informed Zahir about an address somewhere at Mirpur, where he might find his brother, the famous writer Shahidullah Kaiser. Shahidulla was captured and killed by the Pakistani army and the local collaborators during the last days of the war. Accordingly Zahir left home to get his brother back and he never returned. Zahir’s dream was fulfilled. He could see the inception of a free independent Bangladesh though he did not get back his brother. And it’s a pity that this dreamer was missing at such a time when his dream came true.

1. An active (a) — of language movement, Zahir Raihan was born on 19 August 1935 in Feni district. He also (b) — part in mass movement and liberation war. He wanted to (c) — freedom of speech. He was a (d) — film maker. He (e) — his life for the freedom of the country.

2. Zahir Raihan took an (a) — part in the Language Movement defying the (b) — imposed by the then autocratic govt. His (c) — to our Language Movement is immense. He wanted to (d) — freedom of speech. The real patriot and legendary film-maker (e) — down his life for the liberty of the country.

3. Zahir Raihan was a good (a) — of his time. He dreamt for a democratic society and a society where freedom of speech will be (b) — for everyone. He was a (c) — film-maker. ‘Jibon Theke Neya’ was an (d) — film made by Zahir Raihan. The family in the film presented the (e) — of Pakistani govt.

4. Zahir Raihan is a great son of our country. He was basically a (a) — film-maker. He also wrote a number of novels. Besides he was an (b) — worker in organizing Language Movement that ultimately (c) — to the War of Liberation. He was a dreamer of independence. During the Liberation War he played a very important role. He made documentary films on the (d) —. Pakistanis did on the Bengalees in 1971 (e) — the war. One of his greatest documentaries is Stop Genocide.

5.  Zahir Raihan desired to establish a (a) — free from exploitation. He dreamt for a society that will (b) — freedom of speech. He (c) — part in different movements to achieve this goal. He wanted to (d) — world opinion in favour of our Liberation War. With this view in mind, he made his famous movie “Stop Genocide”. “Stop Genocide” was (e) — to create world sentiment in our favour. Zahir Raihan had to sacrifice his life for our liberation.

6. Zahir Raihan, a great name in film, has brought a (a) — change in our national life. He had a vital role in (b) — people for Liberation War. His great creation ‘Jibon Theke Neya’ is based on (c) —. It’s a revolt against the then (d) — rulers. Though he is no more, he will remain (e) — among us as long as Bangladesh exists.

7. Zahir Raihan desired to establish a (a) — free from exploitation. He dreamt for a society that will (b) —. He freedom of speech. He (c) — part in different movements to achieve this (d) — wanted to (e) — world opinion in favour of our Liberation War.

8. Zahir Raihan is one of those men (a) — we remember and respect. He was a (b) — talented film maker. He dreamt of an (c) — free, sovereign society. He took (d) — part in the Language movement, the Mass Movement and the Liberation War. But it was an (e) — of late that he could not see the freedom of his motherland with his own eyes.

9. ‘Stop Genocide’ a documentary (a) — by Zabir Raihan created a sentiment worldwide so that the people might (b) — the Liberation War of Bangladesh. Earlier, he proved his (c) — as a film maker by making a legendary movie, Jibon Theke Neya’. Zahir Raihan was a (d) — of a democratic society. But it is a matter of great regret that this dreamer (e) — on 30 December 1971.

 

Eid is the main religious festival of the Muslims in Bangladeh. Eid means happiness. Eveyone wants to share this happiness with their near and dear ones. So most of the people, who are living outside their home for different reasons have a strong desire to get back home during the Eid vacations. As a result, there is a mad rush in the buses, trains, or launches for the home-bound people. This often causes transport accidents that take away many lives. However, it cannot stop people’s desire to meet their family, in-laws, or friends. What makes people rush for their homes in spite of serious hazards? This is the pull of the roots. Do human beings have roots like the trees? The answer is ‘yes’ but unlike the roots of the trees they are invisible, they lie in our minds. It’s these roots that make a bond between us and family members, inlaws, friends, neighbours or even between us and the land where we were born and

grew up. In that sense our families, land of birth, relatives, our culture, traditions, or surroundings are our roots. And whereever we stay, we have a continuous pull of our roots. It’s our roots that develop our identity making us what we are. When we lose that bond, we become rootless. Human beings who do not have any root or contexts, are non entity. In other words, they do not have their own identity. Such persons are devoid of values, humanity, and social responsibilities. They don’t know where they are from, and/or where they are heading towards. This often makes them feel empty and lost.

Read the following text and fill in each gap with a suitable word based on the information of the text.

1. Eid is the most important (a) — of the Muslims in Bangladesh. It brings happiness to all. People want to share this joy with their near and dear ones. For this reason, most of the people wish to get back their village (b) — during this vacation. It causes a mad rush in all sorts of (c) —. As a result, it causes serious accidents like sudden death. Still the homebound people make a (d) — to go back home. This is because they have a pull of their (e) — from inside their minds. These roots cannot be seen but can be felt.

2. People living outside home feel a strong desire to go home during Eid vacation for (a) — their happiness with their relatives. This strong desire is due to the (b) — of roots. Though we live outside our home, our roots are at our villages where we were (c) — and where our parents and (d) — are living. The pull of roots are so strong that (e) — can stop us from going to our near and dear ones.

3. By nature, human beings love to share their feelings and happiness with near and dear ones. This bond among people (a) — them to return to their roots. The roots we (b) — form our identity. This helps us (c) — who are, where we belong to. So people who tend to recognize their (d) — cannot deny their roots. Denying our roots means denying our (e) —.

4. Eid means happiness and this Eid comes to us (a) — a year. Every Muslim in Bangladesh has a strong (b) — to share this happiness with their (c) — persons. That’s why, almost all Muslims (d) — of rich or poor are found crazy to get back to their homes during this vacation. It causes a mad rush for (e) — buses, trains or launches.

5. By nature, human being loves (a) — to share his/her feelings with near and dear ones. This invisible (b) — for each other lies in their hearts. It always polls us to (c) — back to our roots. It develops our identity and (d) — to know who we are. If we deny our roots, we will deny our existence. So, we can’t but (e) — our roots.

 

Pritilata was born in Chittagong on 5 May 1911. She was a meritorious student at Dr Khastagir Government Girls’ School in Chittagong and Eden College, Dhaka. She finally graduated in philosophy with distinction from Bathune College in Kolkata. In her college days, Pritilata was an activist in the anti-British movement. All through her life, she dreamt of two things: a society without gender discrimination, and her motherland without British colonial rule. So she received combat training to fight against the British rule. Soon after, Pritilata became the headteacher of Nandankanon Aparna Charan School in Chittagong. Gradually she involved herself in Surya Sen’s armed resistance movement. Surya Sen was a famous anti-British movement organizer and activist in Cittagong area that time. In 1932, Surya Sen planned an attack on the Pahartali European Club. The club was well-known for its notorious sign Dogs and Indians not allowed. Surya Sen assigned Pritilata to lead a team of 10-12 men to attack the Club. The raid was successful but Pritilata dressed as a man failed to get out of the Club. She committed suicide by taking potassium cyanide to avoid arrest. She proved that women can work like men. She also proved that women too needed to be prepared to sacrifice their lives for the freedom from the British colonial rule. Her dream came true. The British rule came to an end though she couldn’t see it during her lifetime.
1. We were under (a) — colonial rules for over two hundred years. Who likes to remain in chains? Similar was the case with Pritilata. She (b) — of her motherland free from British colonial rule. She (c) — training and joined anti-British movement. She (d) — her team to attack the notorious European Club but unfortunately she could not get out of the club. She thought it was more honourable to die than to be arrested. So, she committed suicide and (e) — us that we all irrespective of male and female should come forward to sacrifice even our lives for the greater cause of the country.

2. Pritilata was a great (a) —. She was born in Chattogram. She was a student of extraordinary merit. She had her (b) — in philosophy. During her college life she took part in the anti-British movement. She was a supporter of Surja Sen. She dreamt of (c) — free society. So, she got herself (d) — in Surja Sen’s armed resistance movement. In the disguise of a man, she (e) — an attack on the Pahartali European Club.

3. Pritilata was an active (a) — of anti-British movement in then Bangladesh. She worked under the (b) — of Surja Sen. She was a teacher and had a dream of her motherland free from British colonial rule. She (c) — the European Club at Pahartali and became successful but unfortunately she could not come out of it and she (d) — herself. She was determined not (e) — herself to the British rule even for life.

4. We feel thrilled (a) — that Pritilata was a student of Dr Khastagir Govt. High School, Chattogram. Now, we are the students of the same (b) — institution. She was not only a meritorious student but also a woman of outstanding (c) —. She could not remain (d), — during the anti-British movement. She dedicated her life to achieve (e) — of her motherland.

5. Pritilata, (a) — a meritorious student (b) — her study successfully. She (c) — with Surja Sen and fought against the British rule. She (d) — her life for the sake of her country. She was a great warrior (e) — the British rule.

6. Pritilata was one of the brave personalities who fought against the British (a) — rule. To establish a society without gender discrimination, she got herself (b) — in the armed resistance movement. To raid the European Club was an (c) — for her that she did (d) — accordingly but she failed to (e) — herself from the Club and committed suicide.

7. Pritilata was assigned by Surja Sen to attack the club being (a) — by a team of 10-20 men. Though the attack was (b) — Pritilata had to commit suicide. She did this to avoid arrest. From this (c) — we can understand that Pritilata was a very (d) — and strongly determined lady. We shall always (e) — Pritilata with love and honour.

8. Pritilata was one of the brave personalities who fought against the British (a) — rule. All through her life, she dreamt of a (b) — which is free from gender discrimination. She (c) — wanted a land which is free from foreign rule. To make her country (d) —, she took arms and fought against the enemies. Even she sacrificed her life to (e) — her dream come true.

 

‘Heritage’ is what we inherit from the past, live with them in the present and then pass on to our children or future generation. Our unique source of life and inspiration is our cultural and natural heritage. When we speak of ‘World Heritage’, it indicates places and sites that we got from the past and pass on to the future generation of the entire world. The ‘Shat Gambuj Mosque’ in Bagerhat is such a heritage. It became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1985.

Originally, the historic Mosque City was known as ‘ Khalifatabad’. It is situated at the outskirts of Bagerhat town— not very far from the dense mangrove forest of the Sundarbans. Khalifatabad was a Muslim colony. It was founded by the Turkish general, a saint warrior Ulugh Khan Jahan in the 15th century. The infrastructure of the city reveals significant technical skills in many mosques as well as early Islamic monuments. Baked bricks are used for the construction of the buildings. The planning of the city is distinctly dominated by Islamic architecture and the decorations are a combination of Mughal and Turkish architecture.

Khan Jahan built a network of roads, bridges, public buildings and reservoirs to make the city habitable. There are about 360 mosques in the city. Among them the most remarkable is the multi-domed Shat Gombuj Mosque. The mosque is unique in the sense that it has 60 pillars that support the roof, with 77 low height domes. The 4 towers at 4 corners have smaller domes on the roof as well. The vast prayer hall has 11 arched doorways on the east and 7 each on the north and south for light and

ventilation. It has 7 aisles running along the length of the mosque and 11 deep curves between the slender stone columns. These columns support the curving arches created by the domes. The thickness of the arches is 6 feet and have slightly narrowing hollow and round wall. The west wall in the interior has 11 ‘mihrabs’ (niche in mosque pointing towards Makkah). These mihrabs are decorated with stonework and terracotta. The floor of the mosque is made of brick.

Besides being used as a prayer hall, Khan Jahan used the mosque as his court also. Today, it is one of the greatest tourist attractions and one of the best architectural beauties of Bangladesh.

Read the following text and fill in each gap with a suitable word based on the information of the text.

1.  Shat Gambuj Mosque is one of the tourist (a) — of Bangladesh. Everyday thousands of people visit the mosque from home and (b) —. The mosque was built (c) — the Muslim colony by Khan Jahan Ali, a torch bearer of Islam. He established an (d) — city called Khalifatabad. It is the mosque that presents the (e) — beauty of Mughal Empire.

2.The Shat Gambuj Mosque in Bagerhat (a) — a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1985. It was (b) — by a saint warrior Ulugh Khan Jahan in the 15th century. It has 60 pillars, 77 low height (c) — and 4 towers. Khan Jahan Ali (d) — the mosque as his court. Now, it is one of the greatest tourist attractions and one of the best architectural (e) — of Bangladesh.

3.There are three World Heritage (a) — in Bangladesh. The historic “Shat Gambuj Mosque is one of them. The UNESCO (b) — it a World Heritage Site in the year 1985. It is a 15th century Islamic edifice (c) — at the outskirts of Bagerhat town. It is (d) — enormous Mughal architectural site covering a very large area. Khan Jahan Ali (e) — the mosque both as a prayer hall and a court.

4. Heritage means which we (a) — from the past. The Shat Gambuj Mosque is one of the remarkable heritages of Bangladesh. It (b) — world hertiage in 1985. Khan Jahan Ali (c) — his city with mosques, tanks and public buildings. For the first time he made roads from Khulna to Jashore. The (d) — has 77 squat domes including 7 chowchala or four-sided domes in the eastern row. The wall was decorated with (e) — and foliage.

5. The interior western wall was infrastructured with stonework. “Shat Gambuj Mosque” is one of the World Heritage (a) — in Bangladesh. The UNESCO (b) — it a World Heritage Site in 1985. It is a 15th century Islamic edifice at the outskirts of Bagerhat town. It is an (c) — Mughal architectural site covering a very large area. It was founded by a (d) — saint Khan Jahan Ali. The mosque is renowned for its numerous (e) — and architectural beauties. Khan Jahan Ali used the mosque both as a prayer hall and a court.

6.The Shat Gambuj Mosque in Bagerhat was (a) — as one of the World Heritage Sites in 1985. Actually, the old name of Bagerhat was (b) —. The mosque has a (c) — feature by having 60 pillars (d) — the roof. The mosque is used (e) — as a prayer hall and the court of Khan Jahan Ali.

7. Heritage bears the (a) — of a country. Among our remarkable heritages Shat Gambuj Mosque is one. Ulugh Khan Jahan Ali, a (b) — general and saint built this mosque in the 15th century. It is (c) — in its unique features. One wonders how such a building was (d) — so long ago with so much architectural designs. So tourists come here to observe this wonderful (e) —.

8. In mid-15th century, a Muslim colony was (a) — in the inhospitable mangrove forest of the Sundarbans near the seacoast of Bagerhat district (b) — a saint Ulugh Khan Jahan. He was the early torch bearer of Islam in the south who (c) — the nucleus of an affluent city during the reign of Sultan Nasiruddin Mahmud Shah. Khan Jahan Ali (d) — his city with numerous mosques, tanks, public buildings, reservoirs etc. The most (e) — of which is the imposing multi-domed mosque in Bangladesh known as the Shat Gambuj Masjid.

 

21 February is a memorable day in our national history. We observe the day every year as International Mother Language Day. The day is a national holiday. On this day, we pay tribute to the martyrs who laid down their lives to establish Bangla as a state language in undivided Pakistan in 1952. This is known as the Language Movement.

The seed of the Language Movement was Sown on 21 March 1948 when Mohammad Ali Zinnah, the then Governor General of Pakistan, at a public meeting in Dhaka declared that Urdu would be the only official language of Pakistan. The declaration raised a storm of protest in the eastern part of the country. The protest continued non-stop, gathering momentum day by day. It turned into a movement and reached its climax in 1952. The government outlawed all sorts of public meetings and

rallies to prevent it.

The students of Dhaka University defied the law and they brought out a peaceful protest procession on 21 February 1952. When the procession reached near Dhaka Medical College, the police opened fire on the students, killing Salam, Rafiq, Barkat and Jabbar. This enkindled the sparks of independent movement of Bangladesh.

1. Our Language Movement is our (a) —. The (b) — of the students of Dhaka University in this movement is the greatest because it is they (c) — stepped down into the (d) — demanding the acceptance of the legitimate right of the people (e) — in the eastern part of the then Pakistan.

2. All Bangladeshis remember the memory of the (a) — on February 21. They walk barefooted to the Shaheed Minar. They proceed (b) — towards the Shaheed Minar. They pay (c) — to the memory of the martyrs. They (d) — flowers and pray for the souls of them. They also gather in mosques, temples and some other religious institutions and wish for the salvation of the martyr’s (e) — souls.

3. People across the country observe 21 February to remember the (a) — martyrs. They organize various (b) — to celebrate the day. At dawn they, putting on black badges, attend the (c) — barefoot and sing mourming songs which remind them of the (d) — sacrifice of the martyrs. The Shaheed Mínar gets flooded with (e) — of flowers.

4. 21 February is International Mother Language Day. But it (a) — the most for the Bangalees. The Bangalees (b) — down their lives for the mother tongue. Thus they (c) — Bangla as one of the state languages of Pakistan. This sacrifice led the Bangalees to the (d) —. In other words, Language Movement worked as the (e) — of freedom.

5. 21 February is a memorable day in our (a) — history. We (b) — the day every year as the International Mother Language Day. The day is a national holiday. On this day. we pay tribute to the martyrs who laid down their lives to (c) — Bangla as a state language in undivided Pakistan in 1952. In fact, the (d) — of the Language Movement was sown on 21 March 1948 when Muhammad Ali Jinnah declared that Urdu would be the only state language of Pakistan. The declaration (e) — a storm of protest in the eastern part of the country.

 

Michael Madhusudan Dutt was a popular 19th-century Bengali poet and dramatist. He was born in Sagordari on the bank of the Kopotaksho River, a village in Keshobpur Upozila under Jessore district. From an early age, Dutt aspired to be an Englishman in form and manner. Though he was born in a sophisticated Hindu family, he took Christianity as a young man, much to the ire of his family, and adopted the first name Michael. In his childhood, he was recognised by his teachers as a precious child with a gift of literary talent. His early exposure to English education and European literature at home and his college inspired him to imitate the English in taste, manners and intellect.

Since his adolescence he started believing that he was born on the wrong side of the planet, and that his society was unable to appreciate his intellect. He also believed that the West would be more receptive to his creative genius. Michael was an ardent follower of the famous English poet Lord Byron. So after adopting Christianity, he went to Europe and started composing poetry and drama almost entirely in English. They proved his higher level of intellectual ability. However, he failed to gain the right appreciation. With his utter frustrations he saw that he was not regarded as a native writer of English literature. Out of his frustration he composed a sonnet in Bangla “Kopotaksha Nad”, which earned him huge reputation in Bangla. Gradually he could realise that his true identity lies here in this Bengal and he was a sojourner in Europe. Afterwards he regretted his attraction for England and the Occident. He came to Bengal and devoted himself to Bangla literature from this period. He is the poet to write the first Bangla epic Meghand Badh Kabya.

1. Michael Madhusudan Dutt was a great Bengali poet. He was born in a village on the bank of the Kopotaksha River. From his (a) —, he desired to be an Englishman. He always tried to (b) — the English (c) —. So, he adopted Christianity. Then he went to Europe and began to write (d) — in English. He (e) — appreciation from English society. But he could not gain appreciation. Then he came back to Bengal.

2. Love for own country and language cannot be (a) — by any other thing. The case of Michael Madhusudan Dutt is a (b) — example of this. Michael wanted to be an Englishman in (c) — and deeds. He loved English (d) — than his mother language Bangla. He expected to shine as an English poet, but his efforts went in vain. At last he could (e) — his wrong vote. We all should take lesson from the life of Dutt. It is really true that we should love our mother language just like our mother.

3. Michael Madhusudan Dutt went to Europe to pursue his (a) — career. Underestimating his own society, Dutt believed that only the West could appreciate his (b) — ability and thus was capable of giving him a proper (c) —. He believed that his country was incapable of (d) — him right evaluation. However, he realized that his poetic genius would be flashed through the writing of Bengali (e) —.

4. Michael Madhusudan Dutt was one of the most popular writers in the history of Bangla (a) —

He was the (b) — who wrote first Bangla epic. He wrote several poems as well as (c) —. He (d) — by a famous English poet Lord Byron for his writings. Though at first he wrote in English, he ultimately realized that his (e) — lies in his own country.

5. Michael Madhusudan Dutt was born into an (a) — Hindu family. He (b) — Christianity. It caused much anger to his family members. Since his adolescence he aspired to be an Englishman. His teacher discovered that he was gifted with (c) —. He had considerable passion for English and European literature. So, after adopting Christianity he went to Europe and started composing poetry and drama completely in English. But he was frustrated to see that his writings were not (d) —. So, he composed a Bengali sonnet “Kopotaksha Nad”. This brought much (e) — for him.

6. Madhusudan, was a renowned (a) — poet. During his early life he had the notion that he was his talent. born on the (b) — side of the world. As a result, he went to England to (c) —. Surprisingly he was not (d) — in the West in spite of his great intellectual abilities. With a heavy heart he returned home. He is the author of the first Bangla epic (e) —.

7. Being affectionate towards the (a) —, Madhusudan Dutt took Christianity. Then he (b) — his first name Michael When he was (c) —, he became anxious of living in Bengal instead of Europe. So, he went to Europe for (d) — of his intellect. He did the best but he failed to gain the right (e) —.

 

Let’s imagine a citizen’s ordinary day at work. The morning probably starts with a cup of coffee/tea, followed by greeting the colleagues. Then comes the inevitable, which is the logging in the computer. For many of us the third step has become an automatic behavior and it dominates the rest of our work day, receiving and sending dozens of emails.

An e-mail is an electronic mail. It is a computer-aided way of exchanging digital text messages from a sender to one or multiple recipient/s. Emails operate through a network of computers linked by the Internet. There are commercial server agencies such as Yahoo, Gmail, Ymail, Hotmail, etc. that accept the text message from the sender, forward it and deliver instantly to the digital mailbox of the recipient. If the recipient is not online, the message is stored and delivered later when the recipient is

online. It works instantly just with the click of your mouse. It has been a powerful communication tool in modern life.

1. The role of email is vital in modern age because it is the age of communication. (a) — a powerful tool of communication, email (b) — a revolution in this sector. A citizen’s ordinary day at work has become an automatic behaviour and the rest of our work day (c) — by it which is (d) — and send dozens emails. Yahoo, Gmail, Ymail, Hotmail, etc. are the commercial servers that (e) — the text message from the sender, forward it and deliver instantly to the digital mailbox of the recipient.

2. Modern life is (a) — impossible without computer. Computer has now become a (b) — of our daily life. Computer (c) — most of our daily activities. Everyday we send lots of emails by computer. An email is a computer-aided way of sending and receiving text message. There is no doubt that emails have become an important communication (d) — in modern days. The use of computer (e) — communication will increase day by day.

3. The present age is (a) — by the advancement of communication. Communicating with people all over the world has become an (b) — part of our life. Communication between people has now become easier than (c) — before. Email has brought about a revolutionary change in the (d) — of communication. For this we are (e) — to computers.

4. Nowadays an officer starts his day’s work (a) — in the computer. Then he opens his mailbox and checks it. If he needs to send a message to any (b) —, he will compose a message and (c) — the mouse. It will reach the recipient (d) —. Now, email has been a (e) — mode of communication.

 

Countries of the world rely heavily on petroleum, coal and natural gas for their energy sources. There are two major types of energy sources: renewable and nonrenewable. Hydro-carbon or fossil fuels are non-renewable sources of energy. Reliance on them poses real big problems. First, fossil fuels such as oil, coal, gas etc, are finite energy resources and the world eventually will run out of them. Secondly, they will become too expensive in the coming decades and too damaging for the environment to repair. Thirdly, fossil fuels have direct polluting impacts on earth’s environment causing global warming. In contrast, renewable energy sources such as, wind and solar energy are constantly and naturally replenished and never run out.

Most renewable energy comes either directly or indirectly from the sun. Sunlight or solar energy can be used for heating and lighting homes, for generating electricity and for other commercial and industrial uses.

The sun’s heat drives the wind and this wind energy can be captured with wind turbines to produce electricity. Then the wind and the sun’s heat cause water to evaporate. When this water vapour turns into rain or snow and flows downhill into rivers or streams, its energy can be captured as hydroelectric energy.

Along with the rain and snow, sunlight causes plants to grow. Plants produce biomass which again can be turned into fuels such as fire wood, alcohol, etc identified as bioenergy.

Scientists have identified Hydrogen as another form of renewable energy source. It is the most abundant element in nature. But it does not exist separately as a gas. It is always combined with other elements, such as with oxygen to make water. Hydrogen, separated from another element, can be burned as a fuel to produce electricity.

Our Earth’s interior contains molten lava with tremendous heat. This heat inside the Earth produces steam and hot water which can be tapped as geothermal energy to produce electricity, for heating home, etc.

Ocean energy comes from several sources. Ocean’s force of tide and wave can be used to produce energy. The surface of the ocean gets more heat from the sun than the ocean depths. This temperature difference can be used as energy source too.

1. Of the two (a) — types of energy sources, there are some problems with the non-renewable one. In the course of time, they will be (b) — and very expensive. They have also direct negative impact on the (c) —. On the contrary, renewable energy source is (d) — and never runs out. Most renewable energy comes either directly or indirectly from the (e) —. The sun’s heat drives the wind and this wind energy can be captured with wind turbines to produce electricity.

2. Renewable energy and non-renewable energy sources play a very important role throughout the (a) — of the world. Non-renewable energies being on sharp (b) — and being a serious threat to our environment, we are now to (c) — on making use of renewable energies directly coming from the sun. Wind energy (d) — by the sun can be used to produce (e) —.

3. Our (a) — on fossil fuels should be reduced beforehand using them (b) — negative consequences as the earth possesses a limited reserve of hydro-carbons. These non-renewable energy sources are (c) — day by day. As a result, soon we’ll be left with little. (d) — resources will cause them to be too (e) — to obtain.

4.  Countries of the world depend heavily (a) — petroleum, coal and natural gas (b) — of the energy sources. Renewable and non-renewable (c) — the two major types of sources (d) — energy. Hydro-carbon of fossil fuels are non-renewable sources of energy. To (e) — on them poses real big problems.

 

Read the following text and fill in each gap with a suitable word based on the information of the text.

The culture of India is one of the oldest and unique in the world. In India, there is amazing culture diversity throughout the country. The South, North, and North-east have their own distinct culture and almost every state has carved out its own cultural distinction. There is hardly any culture in the world that is as varied and unique as India. There are 17 major languages and 844 dialects used by the people of India. Thus, India is a tourists’ delight. The Taj Mahal, Fatehpur Sikri, the Qutb Minar and the Red Fort are a few of the many wonders which attract people from all over the world. Kashmir has been described as a paradise on earth. The country of mountains, valleys, deserts, rivers and lakes offer the richness of a mini world within a single country.

1. There is hardly any culture in the world that is as varied as India. The cultural diversity of India is (a) —. In fact, it is a (b) — one. Each state is culturally (c) — Different languages. dialects and cultures have made India a (d) — of tourists. In a word, India is a (e) — world.

2.The cultural diversity of India is (a) —. In fact, it is a (b) — one. Every state of this country has it’s own (c) — culture, (d) — of languages, dialects and culture have made India a delight of tourists. In a word, India is a (e) — of the whole world.

 

Long ago, a young man found living in the family in his village full of problems and sufferings. Quarrels, ill-feelings, jealousy, enmity – all were part of everyday life there. So he left his house and went to a jungle to live by himself. There he made a nice little hut with wood, bamboo and reeds. “Ah, how happy I am here!” said the man to himself. But one day he found some mice in his hut. The little creatures soon made holes in his blanket. So he brought a cat to kill the mice. The cat needed milk. So he brought a cow. The cow needed grass and hay. So he brought a cowboy. The cowboy needed food. So he took a wife to cook meals. Then children were born to them, and the man found himself again in a family. So nobody can live alone unless they are either angels or devils. People need food, shelter, companions and cooperation. They need to help each other. And if they live in a family or community, their need can be fulfilled. Hence living in society can make people good and happy citizens.
Read the following text and fill in each gap with a suitable word based on the information of the text.

1. There is no one (a) — lives alone. Everybody has a (b) — for living in society. Like other basic needs, companions and cooperation are (c) — for human beings. Living in society is always cozy and (d) —. With a view to (e) — people good and happy citizens, we must live in society.

2.The passage (a) — with a man who found village life difficult for various (b) —. In order to live alone with (c) —, he left his house and made a nice little hut in (d) — jungle when he faced problems. The man found himself again in a family as he had to solve one problem (e) — another.

3. There was a young man named Ruplal who lived with his family in a small village (a) — near a jungle. Though the (b) — was beautiful, he (c) — many problems there. He disliked the place because the people of the place used to quarrel (d) —. So, he (e) — to leave his village and settle in the jungle. 4. A young man found his life (a) — in the family. So, to live alone, he went to a (b) — jungle and made a (c) — hut for him. One day he found his blanket cut by mice. This made him (d) —. To solve various problems, he had to take so many things and beings. Gradually, he found himself in a big (e) —. This proves that man cannot live alone if he is neither an angel nor a devil.

 

Lake Baikal is the deepest and one of the biggest and most ancient lakes of the world. It is situated almost in the centre of Asia. Lake Baikal is a gigantic bowl set 445 meter above sea level. This grand, enormous, unusual and charming miracle of nature is located in the south of Eastern Siberia, in the Buryat Autonomous Republic and region of Irkutsk, Russia.

The lake covers 31,500 sq.km. It is 636 km long and an average of 48 km wide. The widest point of the lake is 79.4 km. The water basin occupies 557,000 sq. km. and contains 23,000 cu.km.(cubic kilometer) of water, which is about one fifth of the world’s reserves fresh surface water.

The average water level in the lake is never higher than 456m. The average depth of Lake Baikal is 730 m., and its maximum depth in the middle is 1,620 m. It would take about one year for all the rivers of the world to fill Baikal’s basin, and would take four hundred years for all the rivers, streams and brooks now flowing into Siberian lake-sea to do the same.

There are hot springs in the surrounding area of Lake Baikal. The quality of the water of these springs is excellent. The lake acts as a powerful generator and bio filter producing this water. Baikal is a stormy lake. Autumn is the most stormy time. The wind blows various directions.

The weather depends on the wind. If it is blowing from the north, the weather is bright and sunny. The water of the lake looks green and dark blue. But if the winds get stronger, Baikal turns black, waves rising high with white crest. The beauty of Lake Baikal is exceptional.

1. The deepest and the most ancient lake of the world is the Lake Baikal. The (a) — position of this magnanimous lake is nearly in the heart of Asia. The area of this lake is 31,500 sq. kr. the Lake Baikal is (b) — by many hot springs which are excellent (c) — of water. Due to the blowing of the wind into several directions, the Lake Baikal always (d) — a stormy look. Green and dark blue aspects of the lake water are quite natural (e) — there are the fury of the wind.

2. Baikal is a lake. It is the (a) — and one of the most ancient lakes of the world. Hot Springs have been created in the (b) — area of the lake. The water of these springs is very excellent. Its weather is stormy mostly in (c) —. The wind comes from (d) — directions. The quality of the water depends on the wind. The water looks (e) — during the storm.

3. The Baikal is one of the biggest (a) — of the world. It is in the (b) — of Asia. The widest point of the lake is 79.4 km. The Baikal Lake has several hot (c) — in the (d) — area. The quality of the water of these springs is (e) —. The Baikal Lake also acts as a powerful generator. The beauty of the Baikal is unique.

4. Very few lakes (a) — as big as Lake Baikal. It is the most wonderful (b) — of God. The condition of the (c) — depends on the wind. It is the best (d) — of fresh surface water. And the beauty of lake is (e) — exceptional.

5. Lake Baikal is the deepest lake of the world. The (a) — position of this huge lake is almost in the heart of Asia. The lake contains about one fifth of the world’s reserves of fresh surface water. The average water level in the lake is as (b) — as 456m. It would take about a (c) — year for all the rivers of the world to fill Baikal’s basin. The lake is (d) — by many hot springs. Due to blowing of the wind into several directions, Lake Baikal always (e) — a stormy look.

 

Partha Pratim Majumder was born in 1954 in Pabna to a family of artistes. He spent most of his early years in his ancestral home, one of the biggest houses, situated in a small locality known as Kalachandpara. At that time Kalachandpara was well known for its cultural activities. There were festivals and various types of cultural shows round the year. Majumder’s father, a photographer by profession was an art lover. He taught and inspired his son to appreciate different forms of art. Majumder went to live with his aunt in Chandernagar, 30 kilometres away from Kolkata in 1966. It was there that he first came across a mime artiste named Jogesh Dutta. The way Dutta narrated stories without uttering a single word, left Majumder spellbound. He took lessons on mime from Dutta in Jogesh Dutta’s mime academy in Kolkata from 1966 to 1972.
Read the following text and fill in each gap with a suitable word based on the information of the text.

1. Pratim Majumder was born into a family of (a) — performers. His birthplace was full of (b) —. His father was also a cultural (c) —. His father (d) — all he could for his son. He took formal lessons on mime while (e) — in Kolkata from 1966 to 1972.

2. Partha Pratim Majumder was born into a family of (a) — background. He found a favourable (b) — to learn art. His father was a true lover of art. He made his son (c) — in all forms of art. His father’s (d) — helped him to be a great artiste. Majumder left Bangladesh for Kolkata. There he met Jogesh Dutta, a famous artistee of (e) —. He learnt mime from Dutta for about seven years.

3. Perhaps many of us do not know about Partha Pratim Majumder. He is (a) — mime artiste. He (b) — day-to-day activities in his mime. There was sadness as well as (c) — in his mime. And this (d) — artiste was born in 1954 in Pabna. He passed most of his early life in his home at his village. In 1966 he went to live with his aunt in Chandernagar. It is 30 kilometers away (e) — Kolkata. He met a famous mime artist named Jogesh Dutta in Kolkata.

4. Many of us do not know about Partha Pratim Majumder (a) — was a mime artist. He Performed day-to-day activities in his (b) —. This (c) — artist was born in Bangladesh. He passed a part of his boyhood at his (d) — village. He met a famous mime artist in Kolkata (e) — Jogesh Dutta.

5. Majumder was born into a family of artistes. By (a) — his father was a photographer. Being a photographer, he loved art very much. He taught his son to (b) — different forms of art. At one (c) — of time Majumder went to India to live with his aunt. The place was 30 kilometers away from Kolkata and the year was 1966. At that place, Majumder came in (d) — with a mime-artiste named Jogesh Dutta. Majumder (e) — training on mime in Dutta’s mime academy.

6. Partha Pratim Majumder was born in 1954 in Pabna into a (a) — enlightened family. He spent most of his time in his forefather’s home. His forefather’s house was of big size. It was (b) — in a small locality known as Kalachandpara. At that time Kalachandpara was a (c) — of cultural activities. His father had deep passion for art. Majumder got (d) — for art from his father. The most turning point in his life happened in 1966 when he went to Chandernagar. There he came in (e) — with another famous artiste named Jogesh Dutta.

7. Majumder came of a family of artistes. Most of his early years were spent in the home of his (a) — which was in a small locality known as Kalachandpara. The (b) — was well known for its cultural activities. Majumder’s father was a lover of (c) —. or art. He inspired Majumder to be a lover of art.  However, it was Jogesh Dutta (d) — impressed the mind of Majumder most to take up mime as a (e) —.

 

Yoga is a kind of posture and breathing exercises. It brings together physical and mental disciplines to achieve peace of body and mind, helping you relax and manage stress and anxiety. Traditional yoga puts emphasis on behavior, diet and meditation. But if you’re just looking for better stress management— and not an entire lifestyle change, yoga can still help. Youga trainers gradually choose easier to complex activities for practitioners. However, all practitioners do not necessarily need the

same kinds of practice.

Read the following text and fill in each gap with a suitable word based on the information of the text.

1. Yoga helps us a lot in (a) — some chronic diseases. This does not mean that yoga (b) — us to be treated by doctors. The fact is that the yoga gives us the (c) — result when it is combined (d) — standard treatment. So, we should not hope to get 100% (e) — from yoga in all cases.

2. Yoga plays an important role in (a) — our physical and mental health. It reduces our stress and anxiety. (b) — our physical fitness and might be helpful in (c) — of various chronic diseases such as cancer, depression, pain, anxiety, insomnia etc. So we can have (d) — to yoga side by side with our (e) — treatment.

3. Yoga (a) — physical and mental disciplines, the aims of (b) — are to bring peace of body and mind, to help you relax and (c) — your stress and anxiety. Yoga in (d) — with medical treatment can help with some chronic diseases. So we can resort to yoga as (e) — aid to doctor’s advice.

4. Yoga is a relaxation technique in which a (a) — of breathing, exercising and meditation prevails in the right portion. It helps to increase the (b) — of the body as well as to bring a complete (c) — between mind and body. In the case of stress reduction, Yoga trainers (d) — meditation. To achieve physical and emotional harmony, therefore, we cannot ignore the (e) — benefits of yoga.

 

Read the following text and fill in each gap with a suitable word based on the information of the text.

India is our closest neighbour. It is the largest among South Asian countries. In fact, India is the seventh largest country in the world with an area of 3,287,590 square kilometers, India is bounded by the Indian Ocean on the South, the Arabian Sea on the West, and the Bay of Bengal on the East. It is bordered by Pakistan to the West; China, Nepal and Bhutan to the North; and Bangladesh and Myanmar to the East. India is the world’s second most populous country after China. Its population is around 1.5 billion. New Delhi is the capital of India and around 13 million people live in the capital. India is a land of ancient civilization. Indian history begins with the birth of the Indus Valley Civilization and the coming of Aryan. During this period, Aryan culture flourished in this part of the world. The fifth century saw the unification of India under Asoka, and it is in his time that lion people live in the capital coming of the Aryans. During this period Buddhism spread in many parts of Asia. In the eighth century, Islam came to India for the first time and in the eleventh century it had firmly established itself.

India is the closest (a) — country of Bangladesh among some other countries of South Asia. It is (b) — by Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh and China. It is also bounded by one ocean, one sea and one (c) — on the three of its sides. After China, it is the second most densely (d) — country of the world. It is an example of culturally (e) — country.

 

To be a good citizen, you have to prepare yourself to do good work in society. Well, then how can you prepare yourself? First you need knowledge. Today’s society in knowledge based without having knowledge of modern science, technologies, including ICT and other necessary subjects, you will have difficulty living a good life. The other areas you a good citizen should have knowledge about are our country, its constitution. Geography people state is executive and legislative powers, judicial system government and its structure and functions, history, cultures, traditions, literature, moral values and religions, socio-economic activities and religions Second you need skills to do things. Knowledge is not enough. You must be able to apply your knowledge to do things practically Finally knowing and doing things will bring about a change in your behaviour towards others. This behavioural change will show your attitudes towards others, that is, it will show how you think and feel about a person or thing.
1. For (a) — a good citizen, one (b) — knowledge (c) — today’s society is knowledge based. A good citizen must have knowledge about modern science, technologies, country constitution etc. (d) — a good citizen must have skills. Knowledge together with skills (e) — behavioural change towards others which is called attitudes.

2. Today we live in knowledge (a) — society. The other thing one (b) — in society is skill. It should be applied for (c) — purposes. Finally knowing and doing things (d) — about a change in a person’s behavior. This (e) — change makes a min understand and feel others.

3. If you want to be a good citizen, you have to acquire (a) — by doing some good work in the society. Ok then how can you (b) — yourself? First gather knowledge. Because today’s (c) — is knowledge based. (d) — good knowledge you cannot (e) — yourself as a good citizen.

 

Everyone must play a part in protecting the environment. There are many things you can do on your own every day to help save the planet. Here are some suggestions.

Really, the best thing we can do for the planet is to use less of it. Our consumer society is mainly responsible for the environmental crisis. Here are some questions you can ask yourself before buying something, “Do I really need this?” or “Is there another product which would do the same thing but more sustainable?” Or ask the question, “Will this last a long time?” Some other questions may be, “Do I know how this item was made, how it will be used and how it will be disposed of?”

What do you think of using your own ceramic cup or mug at your school or local club? It means there are no plastic cups to throw away. You can wash it and reuse it every day. Unfortunately, we are encouraged to buy a new “improved” item even if the one we have can be repaired or reused. When we buy things, we should buy items which are durable; we should use them properly, and have them repaired when necessary. If we practise this, many things can not only last a life-time, but also be

passed on to future. However, If something is truly unusable for its original purposes, try to be more creative and think of how else it might be used. When you’re done with it, think of whether someone else might be able to use it. You can donate some of the things to the poor. You may also sell some of your used items through personal ads in a local newspaper.

1. The environment in our planet is (a) — day by day and we the humans are responsible for (b) — crisis. Now, it is time of (c) —. By (d) — use of daily necessaries, by reusing our (e) — commodities and by recycling it, we can save the earth.

2. It is our (a) — to save our planet and all of us should take an (b) — part in protecting our environment. We should ask ourselves some questions regarding the (c) — and necessity of the things that we use. It is better (d) — of throwing an item into the (e) — we shall give it to some company who can use it.

 

The Republic of Maldives is an island country in the Indian Ocean. It has 1199 islands that are clustered into 20 major atolls The Maldives in the smallest country in the world with an area of only 300 square kilometres. It is the smallest Asian country in terms of population and size People have been living on the islands of the Maldives for nearly 3000 years. The earliest settlers of the Maldives were probably from southern India and Sri Lanka in the 12th century AD Sailors from East Africa and Arab countries came to the Maldives. In 1344 Ibn Batuta, a famous Arab historian and scholar travelled around the Maldives – In the 16th century, the Portuguese conquered the Maldives and ruled the country for 15 years Although governed as an independent Islamic Sultanate for most of its history from 1153 to 1965, the Maldives was a British colony from 1887 to 1965. Following independence from Britain in 1965, the Sultanate continued to operate for another 3 years. On November 11 106 the Sultanate was abolished and replaced by a republic and the country assumed present name.
1. The Maldives (a) — in the Indian Ocean is the smallest country in Asia, People first settled in this country 3000 years ago. They come from different countries of the world. They were (b) — by its natural beauty. It also attracted the Arabian (c) — who came to this country in the 12th century. And they introduced (d) — in this country. It was under Britain from 187 to 1965. The Maldivians gained their (e) — from Britain in 1965

2.The Maldives (a) — is an island country in the Indian Ocean, is one of the smallest countries of the world. It has (c) — of small Islands (d) — into 26 major atolls. Travellers are (d) — natural beauty. The Arabian (e) — came to this country in the 19th century.

 

Pure mountain air, crystal blue skies and pristine vegetation cover have made Bhutan an ideal destination for the environment lovers. The ecosystem of this small nation supports the existence of rich flora and fauna which are protected by strict laws. Anyone found guilty of killing even a blacknecked crane could be sentenced to life in prison. The government of Bhutan has taken a number of steps to protect its bio-diversity. Bhutan is the first country in the world with specific constitutional obligations on its people to protect the environment. Efforts are also taken to protect the nation against the intrusion of foreign cultures and values. The first foreign tourists were allowed into Bhutan in 1974. Now, tourism is encouraged but is controlled and limited to about 6,000 visitors a year. Bhutan is one of the last countries in the world to introduce television and the Internet to its people. The Bhutanese government has made it mandatory for all Bhutanese to wear only their national dress in public. In 2006, Business Week rated Bhutan as the happiest country in Asia and the eighth happiest country in the world.
1. In Bhutan the ecosystem is preserved by (a) — laws. The constitution of the country protects its (b) — Foreign visitors are controlled and (c) — to about 6000 per year. Bhutanese are not allowed to (d) — any dress they like. Bhutan has been (e) — by the Business Week as the happiest country of Asia.

2. As per the (a) — conducted by Business Week, Bhutan is the happiest country in Asia and the eighth happiest country in the world. The country measures its (b) — in Gross National Happiness (c) — of Gross National Product. GNP includes material achievement while GNH is a (d) — of both material and (e) — achievements.

3. The Bhutanese government is very strict in protecting the flora and fauna of their country by enacting (a) —. The punishment of the violation of the government order is (b) —. The killers of an ordinary black-necked crane are not (c) — from this punishment. Bhutan is indeed the (d) — country in the world to protect its environment by (e) — specific law in the country.

 

It was Autumn. August 26, 1910. A little girl was born to an Albanian descent, rich Catholic merchant’s family in a small town called Skopje, Macedonia. She was the youngest of the three siblings and was named Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu. Who had known that this tiny, little girl would one day become the servant of humanity—love and serve the poorest of the poor and become the mother of humanity. Yes, we are talking about none other than Mother Teresa.

At the age of 12, she heard a voice from within her that urged her to spread the love of Christ. She decided that she would be a missionary. At the age of 18 she left her parental home. She then joined an Irish community of nuns called the Sisters of Loreto, which had missions in India. After a few months of training at the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Dublin, Mother Teresa came to India. On May 24, 1931, she took her initial vows as a nun. From 1931 to 1948, Mother Teresa taught geography and catechism (religious instruction) at St. Mary’s High School in Kolkata (then Calcutta). However, the prevailing poverty in Kolkata had a deep impact on Mother Teresa’s mind, and in 1948 she received permission from her superiors to leave the convent and devote herself to work among the poorest of the poor in the slums of Kolkata.

1. Although Mother Teresa was born into a rich family, she developed a kind of (a) — for the poor people. This feeling was the effect of an (b) — drive. So, he became a (c) — of an Irish community of nuns. She devoted her life to teaching and (d) —. She (e) — for the poorest of the poor in the slums of Kolkata.

2. Mother Teresa worked (a) — humanity. She could pass her life in the (b) — of sheer pleasure as she was born into a (c) — family. But she didn’t do so. She felt the necessity of (d) — the humanity. In doing so, she sacrificed her (e) — life.

3. Mother Teresa is not only a name but also a great (i) — for the distressed people of the (b) — world. With a view to (c) — the love of Christ she was (d) — by her human compassion. So (e) — her teens, she started her journey to serve the humanity.

4. Mother Teresa was born (a) — 26 August 1910. Her parents (b) — three children and she was the (c) —. She dedicated herself to serve the (d) —. She was (e) — by the destitute in the slums of Kolkata. 5. Mother Teresa was born on 20th August, 1910. Her father was an Albanian and he was a (a) —. She was born in Skopje in Macedonia. She was the third child of her parents. She was very polite and (b) —. She wanted to be a helping (c) — to the destitute. At the age of 18 she (d) — the order of the Sisters of our lady of Loreto in Ireland. In 1928 she began her journey to India. In 1931 she began teaching at Calcutta girls’ school. To make her vision fruitful she (e) — “Nirmal Hridoy in 1952. In 1953 she started an orphanage.

6. Mother Teresa had a (a) — soul and served the sick and helpless (b) — her life. At the age of twelve, an (c) — voice urged her to spread the love of Christ. At the age of 18. she left her parental home and joined an Irish community of nuns (d) — the Sisters of Loreto. After (e) — a few months of the training at the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Dublin, Mother Teresa came to India and got Indian citizenship.

 

The French Sculptor Fredic Auguste Bartholdi was assigned to design and complete a sculpture within 1876, so that it could be a gift for the Americans on the occasion of celebrating the hundred years of the American Declaration of Independence. The statue was a joint venture between the USA and France. The French people would build the statue and assemble it in the States, and the people of the USA were to build the pedestal for the statue. Raising money for the pedestal was completed in August 1885. The construction of the pedestal was finished in April 1886. In the meantime, France completed the Statue in July 1884. They sent it to New York on board the French war ship ‘Isere’ in 1885. While transporting the statue, it was split up into 350 individual pieces and packed in 214 crates. It took four months to put the Statue together and place it on the pedestal. Thousands of people saw the unveiling ceremony of the Statue of Liberty on October 28th 1886. It was centennial gift ten years late. The Freedom that the Statue stands for is not stationary. The broken chain wrapped around her feet, protruding from the bottom of her robe, symbolizes her free forward movement, enlightening the world with her torch, free from oppression and slavery. The Statue’s original torch was the first part constructed in 1876. It was replaced by a new copper torch covered in 24K gold leaf in 1984. The torch is lighted by flood light at night. The original torch is currently located in the lobby of the monument.

Access to the torch has been closed since 1916. From October 28, 2011, on her 125th anniversary, the Statue of Liberty was named “Liberty Enlightening the World Wide Web”. The credit goes to a series of new web cams placed around her torch. Several amazing views will be just a click of a mouse away. On clear days, three cameras provide unobstructed scenes and views. Two cameras provide an ultra wide-angle interactive view of the famous golden torch. The remaining camera looks downwards towards the crown of The Statue of liberty, her face, the tablet she is holding from your computer or smart phone. So a person can have access to the web cam’s live feed of The Statue of Liberty from anywhere

in the world.

1. The Statue of Liberty is the outcome of a joint venture between the USA and France. The Americans (a) — money for funding the pedestal and completed the (b) — of it by April 1866. Then they had it (c) — to New York in a warship in 1885. The launching (d) — of the statue of Liberty took place in October 1886. Thus the statue revealed herself to the (e) —.

2. The Statue of Liberty is a symbol of friendship between the French people and the Americans. The French government (a) — to give it to the USA as a gift at Americans centennial (b) — of independence. But it was delivered ten years later of its centennial ceremony of independence The ‘Statue was (c) — by a French Sculptor named Frederic Bartholdi. He was (d) — to complete the Statue in 1876 by the French government. After (e) — of the Statue it was sent to New York by the French warship Isere in 1885.

3. The Statue of Liberty is an (a) — specimen of (b) —. The United States of America achieved freedom in 1776 and observed the (c) — Jubilee of independence in 1876: however, the (d) — was gifted 10 years (e) — in 1886 by the people of France.

4. The Statue of Liberty is one of the largest (a) — in the world. It is situated at Liberty Island in the (b) —. The statue was gifted by (c) — to the United States on the occasion of the (d) — the US Independence in 1855. People of France had to manage the fund needed for the construction of the statue. On the other hand, the donors provided the financial help for the pedestal and installation of the (e) —.

5. Statue of Liberty has (a) — a symbol of freedom. But installation of it was not an easy task. The people of America had to raise funds by collecting subscription. Besides, the USA (b) — contributed a lot. Frederic Bartholdi, a Frenchman was the (c) — of the statue. It is one of the greatest status in the world. It (d) — the arrival of millions of (e) — to the United States.

6. Frederie Auguste Bartholdi was a French sculptor. He was given the great (a) — statue to give it to Americans as a (b) — of making on the occasion of celebrating hundred years American declaration of Independence. It was (c) — that the French people would build statue and the American people would build the pedestal. Americans started to (d) — building the pedestal. They took almost one year to (c) — the building of the pedestal.

 

Although formal education or a diploma is not always essential, florists must have a good taste, good eye for colours, shapes and proportion. They have to have good sense for selecting flowers, ribbons and other accessories to make beautiful arrangements. Professional florists are knowledgeable about not only flowers but also designs and techniques. Most florists learn the trade mainly through apprenticeship in a previous flower farming job and also by attending formal floral schools and courses. However, a true passion for flowers and a bit of aesthetic sense are all that can make a florist’s career successful.
1. The career of a florist is funny and exciting. But as a career it is not a (a) — one. Florist work with flower. They have to develop (b) —. Eye-catching floral displays (c) — the testimony to their professional performance. While (d) — various programmes, florists have to choose flowers considering significance and meaning of each flower. Besides, they have to be aware of designs and techniques. As (e) — most florists learn the flower trade.

2.The career of a florist is an (a) — Job at present. It is becoming (b) — day by day. It does not need professional (c) —. It requires aesthetic sense. This is a very wonderful job. A florist works in a rosy atmosphere full of (d) —. He/she needs the (e) — of decoration as well, they also earn huge amount. So you may choose to be a florist.

3. One who deals in flower decoration is called a floral (a) —. Floral designing has (b) — new career for many people (c) — the world Floral designers are also known as florists. It is a nice way of earning (d) —. Working in a rosy atmosphere, florists (e) — an aesthetic sense. One can be a good florist without having any formal education.

4. Floral business is unconventional by (a) —. A professional florist can earn his living through flowers. His job is not like any other (b) — Jobs. A florist possesses a good sense of beauty. A flower designer (c) — eye-catching flowers. A florist decorates different events with different types of flower Formal education is not (d) — to be a florist. But he must have deep sense of the (e) — beauty.

5. A professional florist can earn his (a) — through flowers. His job is not like any other conventional jobs. A professional flower designer displays eye-catching flowers. They (b) — flower displays by mixing real and artificial flowers with other greeneries There is no (c) — of formal education or diploma to be a florist. But he needs to have good taste, good eye for colours, shape and proportion. A florist can be (d) — in his career if he has passion for flowers and aesthetic sense of (e) —.

 

In e-learning, as said by global e-learning guru Dr Badrul H Khan, every step such as, registration, admission, classroom entry and exit, class work, attendance, discussion with course mates, feedback, exams and finally certification must take place electronically through computer and the Internet technology in a virtual campus. Everything is digitized and conducted by a system called Learning Management System (LMS). So online education programmes blend various components of e-learning. The revolutionary concept of e-learning is already in its practice phase in many parts of the world. Professor Khan has developed a framework and important literatures on e-learning which have been praised by pundits worldwide including Bangladesh. Professor Khan is especially enthusiastic about the prospect of e-learning in Bangladesh. How would you feel if Bangladesh contemplates South Asia’s first virtual university? Won’t it be a pioneering step for us in the world of e-learning? Let’s keep our fingers crossed.
1. The idea of e-learning is very new. E-learning is (a) — day by day. In an e-learning system, all (b) —works are done digitally. This system does not need any campus. Even the certification is done electronically with the help of computer in a virtual campus. E-learning is already being (c) — in many parts of the world. Pundits all over the world have (d) — this new system. We hope that e-learning will also be (e) — in our country.

2. One can be a student without (a) — teaching materials. You will be (b) — to know that you can ask a question to your tutor and he can answer your question while travelling by plane. It is (c) — in the system of e-learning. In this system everything can be done through the Internet. You don’t need to go to any (d) — campus. You can attend the classes, take exams and get certificates through the Internet technology in a (e) — campus.

3. Through the (a) — of computer technology benefits, ‘virtual campus’ has emerged in the form of (b) — system. Moreover, social (c) — have enhanced the scope to (d) — a huge number of students (e) —. 4. The (a) — of e-learning is very recent. In e-learning, all the (b) — activities are conducted digitally. No (c) — is needed for these works. Everything (d) — within a virtual campus. E learning is already being (e) — in many countries.

 

 

 

 

Schedule

Schedule

1. Here is a holiday schedule of some holiday spots. Write 5 sentences using months of the year when you will enjoy your holidays there. January is the first month of the year.

Schedule of Holidays

Months of the year Holiday spots Title
1st January Ramsagor, Dinajpur
2nd February  Cox’s Bazar
3rd March Srimongal
11th November  Rangamati
12th December  Kuakata

Answer :
On 1st January we shall go to Ramsagor, Dinajpur. On 2nd day of February we shall go to enjoy the sea-beach called Cox’s Bazar. On March 3 we shall go to Srimongal. On November 11 we shall go to Rangamati. On December 12, we shall go to Kuakata.

 

2. Here is an academic transcript of Mim of her half yearly examination. Write 5 sentences using it.
         Academic Transcript of Mim

Subjects  Grade
Bangla  A
English A+
Mathematics A
Bangladesh and Global Studie  A+
Science  A
Religion B

 

Answer :
Mim got A+ in English and Bangladesh and Global Studies. She got A in Bangla and Science. She got A in Mathematics. She got grade B in Religion. 
She got A in Bangla and Science. 

 

3. Here is a TV schedule of programs on cartoons. Write 5 sentences using days of the week when your friend watch these programs. Saturday is the first day of the week.

TV schedule of programs on cartoons

Days of the week  Program Title
1st day Tom and Jerry
2nd day  Harry Potter
3rd day Mr. Bean
4th day Angry Birds
5th day  Motu Patlu

Answer :
My friend Sanzan enjoys Tom and Jerry on Saturday. He attends Harry Potter on Sunday. He enjoys Mr. Bean on Monday. He watches Angry Birds on Tuesday. He enjoys Motu Patlu on Wednesday.

 

4. Here is a table of schedule of a picnic. Write five sentences using time of a day when you do these activities.       5×1=5

Time Activities
8:00 AM Starting for the picnic
10:00 AM Reaching the place
2:00 PM Taking launch
3:00 PM Cultural programme
5:30 pm Returning journey

Answer : Last Friday we went to Comilla, Coatbari for a picnic. We started for the picnic at 8 AM. We reached there at 10 AM. Then we move here and there. We took our lunch at 2 PM. A cultural programme was arranged at 3 PM. We started our return journey at 5:30 PM.

 

5. Look at the chart of Tanim’s father. He usually does the activities showing in the chart in the mentioned time. Write five sentences for Tanim’s father. 

Activity Time
Get up 6:00 am
Go for walking 6:15 am
Have a shower 7:45 am
Have breakfast 8:00 am
Get dressed for school 9:00 am

4. Write five sentences, about your daily morning activity considering the following points.

[Write the time in numbers and period sequence in ordinal numbers in your writing]

– When do you get up from bed?

– How many things do you do in the morning?

– What time does each activity begin?

 

5. Write five sentences about your weekend activity considering the following points. [Write the time in numbers and activity sequence in ordinal numbers in your writing]

– How do you start your weekend?

– What different things you do on this day?

– What do you do in the evening on the day?

Answer : Friday is my weekend which is different from other days. I start my days with reading newspapers at 7.00 AM. In the afternoon, I visit some of my friends till 6.00 PM.  After Magrib prayer I do my homework, watch TV for sometime and go to bed at 11.00 PM.

 

6. Fill in the gaps by writing the time so that the story makes a sense. (With answers)

Yesterday I passed a very exciting day. There was a football match between our school and Rahamatpur School. The match started sharp at (a) 4 PM. Both the teams played well and there was no goal in the first half. However, at the beginning of the second half the first goal was scored by our team at (b) 5 PM. Our opposition team tried their level best but could not score any goal. There was another chance of scoring another goal by our team at (c) 5.20 PM but it did not happen. The game came to an end on at (d) 5.45 PM. I came home at (e) 6.15 PM with a smiling face.

 

7. Write five sentences about your leisure activities in your school considering the following points.

-When does your leisure hour start?

-How long does it continue?

– What special things you do during this period?

Answer : My leisure starts at 11.00 AM. It continues till 11.30 AM. During this period students take their tiffin and I also do it. Just after having my tiffin, I go to the library. I read story books and newspapers in the library till 12.10 PM. Our class starts at 12.15 PM after the leisure.

 

8. Fill in the gaps by writing the time so that the story makes a sense. (With answers)

I celebrate my birthday on 12 September every year. On this day I invite all of my friends to my house. My friends reach my home by (a) 7.00 PM. I start the part at (b) 7.30 PM. Usually, my friends arrange a cultural programme at (c) 8.00 PM. We have our dinner together at (d) 8.30 PM. The party comes to end at (c) 9.00 PM.

 

9. Write five sentences about your daily afternoon activity considering the following points.

[Write the time in numbers and activity sequence in ordinal numbers in our writing]

When do you come back from school?

What do you do in the afternoon?

What times does each activity begin?

Answer :

I come back from school at around 2:00 PM. After coming back from school I have my lunch first. Secondly, I take rest till 4.00 PM. Thirdly, I go to the field to play and enjoy open air. I play with my friends for one hour and start for home at 5.15 PM.

 

10. Fill in the gaps by writing the time so that the story makes sense (With Answer) :

My father works in a government office. He is very much particular in maintaining his time duties. He gets up very early in the morning at 5:00 PM every day. He says his morning prayer, have morning, have bath and then take his breakfast at 6.30 AM. He starts for office at 7:00 AM. He comes back home after Magrib. We have our dinner together at 8.30 PM. He watches some programmes on TV and goes to bed at 11:00 PM.

 

11. Write 5 sentences about your daily morning activity considering the following points.

[Write the time in numbers and activity sequence in ordinal numbers in our writing]

– When do you get up from bed?

– What things do you do in the morning?

-What time does each activity begin?

Answer :

I am an early riser and gets up from at 5 am. First, I wash my hands and face at 5.15am. Secondly, I go out for a walk at 6.00 am after saying my prayer. Returning home I sit to study at 6.30 am. Lastly, I start for school at 7.45 am after taking my breakfast.

 

12. Fill in the gaps writing the time so that they story makes sense (With Answer) :

Like other I take three main meals a day. First I take my breakfast at (a) 7.00 AM. I have my lunch at (b) 2.00 PM. In our family we all take dinner at (c) 8.00 PM together. I study for one hour and then watch TV till (d) 10.45 PM. Lastly, I go to be at  (e) 11.00 PM.

Short questions/fill in the blanks using information related to days, months, time, cardinal and ordinal numbers in tables/columns or words for figures, students will answer short questions/fill in the gaps.

 

13. Write 5 sentences about Zakir’s daily school activity considering the following points.

[Write the time in numbers and period sequence in ordinal numbers in your writing]

– What time does Zakir’s school begin?

– How may periods are there in the school every day?

– What time does the school break up?

Answer : Zakir is a student of class five. He goes to school every day at around 7.45 AM as his school starts at 8.00 AM. Six periods take place in his school every day except on Thursday.  He attends in all the classes. His schools breaks up at 1.00 pm

 

14.  Fill in the gaps by writing the time so that the story makes a sense. (With answers)

My mother is a housewife. She gets up from sleep at (a) 5.00 AM. She completes preparing our breakfast by (b) 6.30 PM. She starts for school with me at (c) 7.15 AM. She comes back home keeping me in the school. My schools breaks up at (d) 1.00 PM. After the break up she takes me from school and we reach home together at (e) 1.30 PM.

 

15. Write five sentences about your holiday activities till lunch following the questions.

– What time do you get up from bed?

– What do you do first?

– What do you do before going to sleep?

Answer : I get up from bed at 6.30 AM.  I go out for a walk after washing my hands and face. I come back home at 7.00 AM, have shower and have my breakfast. Then I watch TV, read newspapers. I take my lunch at 1.00 PM and have a short sleep.

 

16.  Fill in the gaps by writing the time so that the story makes sense.

Abdul Alim is a teacher. Usually, he get up from sleep at (a) 5 AM. He says his morning prayer and takes morning walk. He gets back home at (b) 6.30 AM. have bath and takes his breakfast. He then studies till (c) 8.00 AM. He starts from school at (d) 8.30 AM. He conducts five periods a day. The school breaks up at 2 PM. But he starts for home at (e) 3.30 PM

 

17. Write 5 sentences about  your activity in your garden considering the following points.

[Write the time in numbers and activity sequence in ordinal numbers in your writing]

– When do you work in your garden?

– What do you do there?

-How much time do you spend each activity?

Answer : I have a small garden beside my home. After coming back from my school I start working in my garden at about 5 pm. First I weed out the grass and remove the unnecessary things from the garden. Secondly I water the garden. Finally, I pluck some flowers and fruits and leave the garden at 5.30 PM.

 

18. Fill in the gaps by writing the time so that the story makes sense. (With answers)

My mother is a teacher. Usually, she gets up from bed early in the morning at (a) 5 AM. After her morning prayer she prepares breakfast for us all at (b) 5.30 AM. She takes her breakfast and serves us breakfast at (c) 6.30 AM. She starts for school at (d) 7.15 AM. She returns home at (e) 6 AM and then starts doing household works.

 

19. Fill in the blanks by writing times to make sense.  1×5=5

Adnan takes snakes and tea at (a) ——-. He sits to learn his lessons at (b) ——-. It contains till (c) ——- He watches TV cartoons from (d) ——-. He eats dinner at (e) ——-.

Answers : a) 5:30 pm. b) 6:00pm. c) 9:00 pm. d) 9:00 pm. e) 10:00 pm

 

20. Write 5 sentences about Jahir’s library work considering the following points.

[Write the time in numbers and period sequence in ordinal numbers in your writing]

* What time does Jahir reach school on working days?

* When does he first visit the school library?

* How long does he stay in the library after the school breaks up?

Answer : Jahir visits his school library regularly. He reaches school at 8.15 am every working day. Then he spends his time in the school library till 9.00 am. His school breaks up at 1.30 pm. He again visits his school library at 1.40 pm and reads there till 3.30 pm.

 

21.  Fill in the gaps by writing the time so that the story makes a sense. (With answers)

Our headmaster is a very sincere person. He comes to school at (a) 7.30 am. Then he moves around the school campus. He sees whether the school compound is clean or not. He moves around the campus till (b) 8.00 am. He attends the assembly at (c) 8.45 pm. Our classes start at (d) 9.00 am. Then he again visits all the classes to see whether all the classes have started timely. Till (e) 9.15 pm he moves around the classes. He remains in the school more than one hour after the school breaks up.

 

22. Write 5 sentences about how you spent the last Friday considering the following points.

[Write the time in numbers and period sequence in ordinal numbers in your writing]

* When did you get up from bed?

* When did you go to mosque?

* What did you do in the afternoon?

Ans. My Friday’s routine is a little bit different from other days of the week. I got up from bed at 7.00 am on last Friday. I went to mosque for offering jumma prayer at 12.30 pm. I came back from mosque at 1.40 pm. In the afternoon I played with my friends till 6.00 pm.

 

23. Fill in the gaps by writing the time so that the story makes a sense.

Our next door neighbor is a very good person. He gets up from sleep at (a) 5.00 am. He says his prayers and starts morning walk. He continues morning walk till (b) 6.00 am. After returning home he takes breakfast at (c) 6.30 am. He starts for his working place at (d) 7.00 am. He comes back from his office at around (e) 5.00 pm. He then works in his garden till magrib prayer.

 

24. Write 5 sentences about how you are planning to spend the Thursday afternoon with your friend considering the following points.

[Write the time in numbers and period sequence in ordinal numbers in your writing]

* When will friend come to you?

* When do you hope to reach home?

* What will you do in the afternoon?

Answer : Our school is half on Thursday. So, my friend Rima will come to our house after the break up at 12.00 am. We hope to reach home by 12.30 pm. We will have lunch together. In the afternoon we will move around the garden to see birds and know the trees of different kinds till 5.30 pm.

 

25. Write five sentences about your attending the birthday party of your friend considering the following points.

 [Write the time in numbers and activity sequence in ordinal numbers in our writing]

-When did you reach your friend’s house?

-What did the party start?

– When did you reach your home?

Answer : I attended my friend Shima’s birthday party was on last Saturday. I reached their house at 5.00 pm. Our other friends reached around 5.30 pm. The party started at 6.00 pm. I reached my home at around 8.00 pm.

 

 26. Fill in the gaps by writing the time so that the story makes sense. (With answers)

My uncle works in a non-government organization. He is very sincere and dedicated officer. He gets up very early in the morning at 5:00 PM everyday. He regularly takes physical exercise. He takes his breakfast at 6.30 AM. Then he starts for office at 7:00 AM. He remains in the office till 7.00 PM. almost all the working days he returns home at around 9.00 PM.

 

27. Write five sentences about your learning English considering the following points.

[Write the time in numbers and activity sequence in ordinal numbers in our writing]

– Who teaches you English?

– What time do you practice speaking?

– What time do you practice writing?

Answer : My father teaches me English besides my English teacher in the school. Every Thursday and Saturday evening I practice English speaking with him at 8.00 PM. usually, we talk about what we did all day long and it continues till 8.20 PM. Then he asks me to write down the activities I did in the school and at home at 8.30 PM. I do writing practice till 9.00 PM.

 

28. Fill in the gaps by writing the time so that the story makes sense. (With answers)

Walking in the morning and evening is good for health. My father regularly starts his morning walk at (a) 6.00 AM . He continues walking till (b) 7.00 AM. Then he comes back home and have bath at (c) 7.30 AM. At (d) 7.45 AM he takes his breakfast. He again takes a walk in the afternoon at (e) 6.00 PM. My father is quite good in health.

29. Fill in the blanks by using time to make a meaningful sense :                         

My name is Pritom. Last week I went to my village with my parents. I woke up at (a) ____. I took my breakfast at about (b) ____. We went to the Kamlapur Railway Station at about (c) ____. The train started at (d) ____. It took us three hours to reach Comilla. We reached there at about (e) ____.

Answers : (a) 8 AM, (b) 8.30 AM, (c) 9.30 AM, (d) 10 AM  (e) 1 PM

Letter

Letter

  1. Suppose, you are Sami/Sushan. Fawzan/Farhan is your friend. Write a letter to him/her about your daily life

Answer to the question no-9

8 October, 2015

Azimpur Govt. Colony, 

Dhaka-1205

Dear Fawzan,

I have received your letter in time. You wanted to know about my daily life in your last letter. Now, I am writing to inform that. 

I get up at 5 O’clock and say my Fazar prayer at 5.30 am. After brushing and freshening up I take breakfast and read my text till then 8 a.m. Then being ready I start for school at 9 a.m. In tiffin period or after returning from school I go to play at 5 pm. Again I read till then 10 pm. After taking supper and watching TV, I go to bed at 11 pm.

I am well. No more today. More when we meet next. 

Your loving friend,

Sami.

  1. Suppose, you are Sami/Anika. Fawzan/Fahmida is your friend. He/She wants to know about Dhaka. Now, write a letter to him/her describing Dhaka.

Answer to the question no-9

9 October, 2015

Azimpur Govt. Colony, Dhaka-1205

Dear Fawzan,

I have received your letter in time. You wanted to know about Dhaka. Now, I am going to tell you about Dhaka, the capital city of Bangladesh. 

You will be highly glad to learn that Dhaka is a very ancient city and this city has a rich historical background. It was found during the Mughal Empire. A lot of people live there. You can see here a lot of things like the Ahsan Manzil, the Lalbag Fort, the National Zoo, the National Museum and so on. If you come to our house, we will see all the things.

I am well. No more today. More when we meet next. 

Your loving friend,

Sami.

  1. Suppose you are Sadia/Saheb. Write a letter to your Indian friend, Anika/Anil about the activities of

your mother.

Answer to the question no-9

October 10, 2015

Ganaktuli, Hazaribagh,

Dhaka-1205

Dear Anika,
How are you? I hope you are fine. In your letter you wrote about your mother. I am going to write about my mother. My mother teaches in a primary school in Hazaribagh, Dhaka. She works in morning shift. After school hours, she works at home. She cooks our food. She also looks after my old grandparents and my siblings.. She takes care of our health and studies. On holidays she cooks special dishes for us like biriyani, korma, kabab, firni, jarda etc. She washes the clothes. She keeps the house clean. Sometimes she goes to the market. She also visits relatives. She helps the sick people. In the evening, she watches TV. She spends her free time with us. She remains busy the whole week.
This is all about my mother’s activities.

Convey my regards to your parents.

Your loving friend,

Sadia.

  1. Suppose, you are Altaf/Asma. Asad/Ayesha is your friend. He wanted to know about the proverb ‘All that glitters is not gold’. Now, write a letter to your friend telling her about it. Use the following cues:

gold glitters — glossy — story of Sheikh Saadi– the rich man — an ordinary man — simple dress – a

gorgeous dress –outward charm — true beauty

Answer to the question no. 9

College Road, Bhola

Dear Asad,

Accept my warm love. Hope you are well. You wanted me to tell you something about the proverb ‘All that glitters is not gold’. Now, I am telling you something about it.

We know that gold glitters in sunlight. But everything glossy is not necessarily gold. You must know the story of Sheikh Saadi.

The rich man took the poet as an ordinary man. Because he was wearing simple dress. The poet went

to the rich man’s house again wearing a gorgeous dress.

He taught him a great lesson. So dress or any outward charm of anything or anybody cannot be a standard of measuring inner worth. True beauty always lies within.

Your friend,

Altaf.

  1. Suppose you are Shahil/Seemla of Nur Mohammad College. Write a letter to your friend, Fahim/Dipti about your good teacher.

Answer to the question no. 9

October 13, 2015

33 Baddanagar Water Tank,

Hazaribagh, Dhaka-1205

Dear Fahim,

How are you? How have you enjoyed during Eid-ul-Azha? I am fine. I am going to write to you about my favourite teacher.

Mr. Kaisar is my favourite teacher. He hailed from Barishal. He is a good teacher. He always gives us

good notes, learning materials and suggestions. He is very caring. He is truly a professional. He is not a by-chance teacher. I am proud of him.

What about you? Who is your favourite teacher? Please write me back.

Your loving friend,

Shahil.

 

  1. Suppose you are Sanjid/Sahida. You live in Arambagh, Dhaka. Write a letter to your friend, Faisal/Asma about mother’s love and obedience to mother.

Answer to the question no. 9

October 14, 2015

Arambagh, Dhaka

Dear Faisal,

How are you? I came to know about the kindness of your mother from your letter. Mother is the greatest person in the world. There is none like mother. Mother’s love is unique in this world. A mother can die for a child. So we should be obedient to our mother. All the great persons in the world were obedient to mother. They followed their mother’s order at any cost. If we read the pages of history books, we will see such evidence. So we should respect our mother and carry out their order in any way.
What about your feeling regarding this point? Please let me know.

Your loving friend,

Sanjid.

Write to your friend about your evening activities

November 27, 2013

Doleshwar, Dhaka

Dear Dia,

At first take my love. I hope you are fine. I am also fine. In your last letter, you wanted to know about my evening activities. Now I am writing about it.

I have a daily routine. I always do my duties according to this routine. In the evening, I usually wash my face and hands and say my evening prayer. Then I take some light foods. After that I sit to read and prepare my lesson till 9 pm. I watch TV from 9 pm to 10 pm. I have my dinner with my parents at 10. Then I brush my teeth. I go to bed  at 10.30.

No more today. Write to me soon about your evening activities.

Your loving friend

Sanjida

 

  1. Write a letter to your friend about how you spend/pass your leisure time.

 

November 27, 2013

Doleshwar, Dhaka

 

Dear Adrey,

At first take my love. I hope you are fine. I am also fine. In your last letter, you wanted to know about how I spend my leisure time. Now I am writing about it.

In my leisure time, I read story books. Sometimes I read English newspaper. It makes me strong in English.  I also go to the playground and play football and cricket.

No more today. Write to me soon about how you spend/pass your leisure time.

 

Your loving friend

Sanjida

 

  1. Write to your friend about your favourite food.

 

November 27, 2013

Doleshwar, Dhaka

 

Dear Adrey,

At first take my love. I hope you are fine. I am also fine. In your last letter, you wanted to know about my favourite foods. Now I am writing about it.

I eat what I get. But I also have some favourite foods. I like to have Ruti and vegetables in my breakfast, rice fish at lunch and dinner. I also like to have meat and dal. Tea is my favourite drink.

No more today. Write to me soon  about your favourite food.

 

Your loving friend

Sanjida

 

 

  1. Write a letter to your friend about your home town.

 

November 27, 2013

Doleshwar, Dhaka

 

Dear Sanjida,

At first take my love. I hope you are fine. I am also fine. In your last letter, you wanted to know about  my home town. Now I am writing about it.

The name of my home town is Kishoregonj. It is a district town. It is only 145 kilometers north-east of Dhaka. There are many important places in and around this town. They are Solakia Eid ground, Pagla Mosque etc. It is also famous for great personalities like Syed Nazrul Islam, the first acting president of Bangladesh. Sukumar Roy and the great master of painting, Zainul Abedin.

No more today. Write to me soon about your home town.

 

 

Your loving friend

Adrey

 

  1. Write letter to your friend about your native village.

 

 

November 27, 2013

Doleshwar, Dhaka

 

Dear Sanjida,

At first take my love. I hope you are fine. I am also fine. In your last letter, you wanted to know about  my native village. Now I am writing about it.

The name of my village is Doleshwar. It is a small village but densely populated. Though it is village, all modern facilities are available here. There are a college, a high school, a primary school and a market in our village. We all live here in peace and amity. I love my village very much.

No more today. Write to me soon about your native village.

 

 

Your loving friend

Adrey

 

  1. Write a letter to your friend about your visit to St. Martin’s island.

 

 November 27, 2013

Doleshwar, Dhaka

 

Dear Sanjida,

At first take my love. I hope you are fine. I am also fine. In your last letter, you wanted to know about my visit to the  St. Martin’s island. Now I am writing about it.

Last summer vacation, I and some of my friends visited the St. Martin’s island. It is the only coral island in Bangladesh. We saw there beautiful corals of different shapes and colours, the turtles that nest on the island and variety of sea fishes. We also went sailing in the sea. We enjoyed the visit very much.

No more today. More when we meet.

 

Your loving friend

Adrey  

 

 

 

 

Write a letter to your friend describing your visit to St. Martin’s Island.

March 15, 2013

Mirpur, Dhaka

Dear Dia,

I have just received your letter. In your letter you wanted to know about my visit to the Martin’s Island. Now I am telling you about it. 

Last summer vacation I went to visit the St. Martin’s Island with my parents. It is a small island. The local name of the island is “Narikel Jinjira” which means Coconut Island. We saw beautiful coral of different shapes and colours in the blue waters of the Bay of Bengal. We also saw coral reef, turtles and variety of sea fishes. The natural scenery of the Island is really enjoyable and it attracted me much. 

No more today, convey my salam to your parents and love to your younger.

Your loving friend

Sima

  1. Write a letter to your friend about how you spend/ pass your leisure time.

At first take my love. I hope you are fine. I am also fine. In your last letter, you wanted to know about how I spend my leisure time. Now I am writing about it.

In my leisure time, I read story books. Sometimes I read English newspaper. It makes me strong in English. I also go to the playground and play football and cricket.

No more today. Write to me soon about how you spend/ pass your leisure time.

  1. Write a letter to your friend about your favourite food.

At first take my love. I hope you are fine. I am also fine. In your last letter, you wanted to know about my favourite foods. Now I am writing about it.

I eat what I get. But I also have some favourite foods. I like to have ruti and vegetables in my breakfast, rice and fish at lunch and dinner. I also like to have meat and dal.Tea is my favourite drink.

No more today. Write to me soon about your favourite food.

  1. Write a letter to your friend about your home town.

At first take my love. I hope you are fine. I am also fine. In your last letter, you wanted to know about my home town. Now I am writing about it.

The name of my home town is Kishoregonj. It is a district town. It is only 145 kilometers north-east of Dhaka. There are many important places in and around this town. They are Solakia Eid ground, Pagla Mosque etc. It is also famous for great personalities like Syed Nazrul Islam, the first acting president of Bangladesh. Sukumar Roy and the great master of painting, Zainul Abedin.

No more today. Write to me soon about your home town.

  1. Write a letter to your friend about your visit to the liberation war museum.

At first take my love. I hope you are fine. I am also fine. In your last letter, you wanted to know about my visit to the liberation war museum. Now I am writing about it.

On 14 December our class went on a field trip to the liberation war museum with the guidance of our headmaster.There were six galleries that exhibited rare photographs, documents, news-paper clippings and objects used by the freedom fighters and martyrs of our liberation war. We spent there for two hours. Before leaving, we watched a video film on our liberation war and our independence. It was an experience we never forget.

No more today. More when we meet.

  1. Write a letter to your friend about your favourite sports.

At first take my love. I hope you are fine. I am also fine. In your last letter, you wanted to know about my favourite sports. Now I am writing about it.

My favourite game is Cricket. You will be very happy to know that in last Bangabadhu Gold Cup Cricket Tournament, our school became champion and I was selected ‘Man of the Match’. I also love to play football and badminton.

No more today. Write to me soon about your favourite sports.

  1. Write a letter to your pen friend about main tourist spots of Bangladesh.

At first take my love. I hope you are fine. I am also fine. In your last letter, you wanted to know about main tourist spots of Bangladesh. Now I am writing about it.

Bangladesh is a beautiful country. There are many interesting places here. They are Cox’s bazaar,Chittagong hill track, Sundarban, Bagerhat Mahasthangar, Moynamoti, St. Martin’s island etc. Among them Cox’s bazar is the most populous tourist spot here. It is the longest sea beach in the world. So I will invite you to visit our country.

No more today. Write to me soon about main tourist spots of your country.

SEEN PASSAGE (3)

Seen passage 3

Set-1
2. Read the passage and complete the table below. 10

Anne Frank is perhaps the most well-known victim of the Nazi Holocaust of World War II. Anne, born on 12 June 1929, was given a diary at the age of 13, in which she chronicled her life from 1942 to 1944. During this time, Anne spent two years in hiding with her family in Nazi-occupied Amsterdam in a secret annex with four other Jews. Betrayed and discovered in 1944, Anne was sent to the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, where she died of typhus in 1945. Anne’s father, Otto Frank, was the only occupant of the secret annex to survive the war. In 1947, he published Anne’s diary as The Diary of a Young Girl. Anne’s account of her internment, as well as her deep belief in humanity has become one of the world’s most widely read books.

 

What/Who Source What/Who When

Anne Frank (i)… Well-known victim of (ii) …

Nazi– Holocaust

Anne and diary living in a (iv) … 1943–1944

(iii) …

The world reading (v) … about (vi) … 1947

Her (vii) … diary humanity after reading (viii) …

(ix) … has become world’s most (x) … after being published

Or. Read the above text and make a flow chart showing different events in Anne’s life. 10

Born in 1929 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-1

  1. Ans. (i) Germany, (ii) after World War II, (iii) her family, (iv) secret annex, (v) ‘The diary of a Young Girl’, (vi) her interment, (vii) deep belief, (viii) the book, (ix) The Diary of a Young Girl’, (x) widely read books.
    2. Ans. Or. (1) Born in 1929 (2) given a diary in 1942 (3) spent from 1942 to 1944 in hiding (4) wrote diary (5) died in 1945 of typhus (6) the diary being published in 1947

Set-2
2. Read the passage and complete the table below: 10

Alexandra Alex Scott was born in Connecticut in 1996, and was diagnosed with neuroblastoma, a type of childhood cancer, shortly before she turned one. In 2000, just after turning four, she informed her mother that she wanted to start a lemonade stand to raise money for doctors to help children. Her first lemonade stand raised 2,000 dollars and led to the creation of the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation. Alex continued her lemonade stands throughout her life, ultimately raising over one million dollars toward cancer research. She passed away in August 2004 at the age of eight. Today, Alex’s Lemonade Stand sponsors a national fundraising weekend in the United States which is popularly known as Lemonade Days. Each year, as many as 10,000 volunteers at more than 2,000 Alex’s Lemonade Stands make a difference for children with cancer.

What/Who Information What/Who When

Alex Scott (i) … birth (ii) …

(iii) … to help wanted to start a (iv)… in 2000

She (v) … lemonade stands throughout her (vi) …

(vii) … United States (viii) … every year

10,000 volunteers (ix) … doing something for each (x) …

of 2,000 Alex’s children with cancer

Lemonade Stands

Or. Read the above text and make a flow chart showing the activities of Alex. 10

  1. Starting a lemonade stand 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-2

  1. Ans. (i) Connecticut, (ii) 1996, (iii) Alex, (iv) lemonade stand, (v) continued, (vi) life, (vii) Alex’s Lemonade Stand, (viii) national fundraising weekend, (ix) America, (x) year.
  2. Ans. Or. (1) Starting a lemonade stand (2) raised money for doctors to help children (3) raised 2000 dollars her first lemonade stand (4) inspired her to build the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation (5) continued her lemonade stands throughout her life (6) making a difference for children with cancer.

 

Set-3
2. Read the passage and complete the table. 10

I am in a tiny steel cage attached to a motorcycle, stuttering through traffic in Dhaka, Bangladesh. In the last ten minutes, we have moved forward maybe three feet, inch by inch, the driver wrenching the wheel left and right, wriggling deeper into the wedge between delivery truck and a rickshaw in front of us. Up ahead, the traffic is jammed so close together that pedestrians are climbing over pickup trucks and through empty rickshaws to cross the street. Two rows to my left is an ambulance, blue light spinning uselessly. This is what the streets here look like from seven o’clock in the morning until ten o’clock at night. If you’re rich, you experience it from the back seat of a car. If you’re poor, you’re in a rickshaw, breathing in the exhaust. 

I’m sitting in the back of a CNG, a three- wheeled motorcycle shaped like a slice of pie and covered with scrap metal. I’m here working on a human rights project, but whenever I ask people in Dhaka what they think international organizations should really be working on, they tell me about the traffic. Alleviating traffic congestion is one of the major development challenges of our time. Half the world’s population already lives in cities, and the United Nations (UN) estimates that the proportion will rise to nearly 70 percent by 2050. Dhaka, the world’s densest and fastest growing city, is a case study in how this problem got so bad and why it’s so difficult to solve. Dhaka’s infrastructure doesn’t match the scale of its population. Just 7 percent of the city is covered by roads, compared with around 25 percent of Paris and Vienna. Dhaka also suffers from the absence of a planned road network. There are 650 major intersections, but only 60 traffic lights, many of which don’t work. That means the police force isn’t enforcing driving or parking rules; they’re in the intersections, directing traffic. 
The cost of Dhaka’s traffic congestion is estimated at $3.8 billion a year, and that’s just the delays and air pollution, not the less-tangible losses in quality of life. Paradoxically, the poor infrastructure is one of the reasons why the city is growing so fast. Without roads or trains to whisk them to the suburbs, Dhaka residents have no choice but to crowd into the middle, set up slums between high-rises, and walk to work.

Who/What Event/Activity Where/Place When/How long

The CNG/The writer moved forward by three feet (i) …. (ii) ….

One of the major development challenges (iii) …. at present 

(iv) …. lives in cities (v) ….

7 percent area (vi) ….. in Dhaka at present.

About 25 percent is covered by roads (vii) …. 

The police directs traffic (viii) …. 

(ix) …. costs $3.8 billion in Dhaka (x) ….

  1. Or. Based on your reading of the passage, make short notes in each of the boxes in the flow-chart

showing the causes for traffic congestions in Dhaka. 

  1. The world’s densest and fastest growing city 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-3

  1. Ans. (i) In the street of Dhaka, Bangladesh (ii) ten minutes (iii) alleviating traffic congestion (iv) Half the world’s population (v) at present (vi) is covered by roads (vii) in Paris and Vienna (viii) in the intersections (ix) Traffic congestion (x) a year.
  2. Ans. Or. 1. The world’s densest and fastest growing city 2. Inadequate infrastructure in terms of population 3. Just 7 percent of the city covered by roads 4. The absence of a planned road network 5. 650 major intersections with only 60 traffic lights 6. No strict enforcement of driving or parking rules.

 

Set-5
2. Read the passage and complete the table below: 10

Children’s right to education also implies that the school they go to will have a pleasant and learning-friendly environment where everyone will have an enjoyable time. Teachers will be kind, caring and supportive and children will feel relaxed. No harsh words will be spoken to them and special care will be taken of children with learning disabilities. That unfortunately is not the general picture in our schools. The system of education in our part of the world does not allow children much freedom, and classrooms look more like cages where they are pent up for hours. Rabindranath Tagore (read his ‘An Eastern University’ in Unit Six) found it unacceptable; so did William Blake (1757-1857), an English poet and painter, whose favorite subjects included children. In his poem ‘The School Boy’ Blake writes about a young boy who is unhappy with his school where dour-faced teachers give joyless lessons. He would rather like to be outdoors and enjoy the summer day. He pleads with his parents to rescue him from the drudgery of school.

What/Who Source/Information What/Where When

Our (i) … existing at present not allowing (ii) … during school time

A young boy (iii) … unhappy (iv) …

The (v) … according to Tagore’s essay (vi) … during the classes

The boy (vii) … enjoying time in (viii) …

(ix) … of The School Boy requesting for (x) … school time

  1. Or. Read the above text and make a flow chart showing the problems of school in our part of

the world. 10

  1. Having no learning friendly environment 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-5

  1. Ans.(i) education system, (ii) much freedom, (iii) The School Boy, (iv) during showering joyless lessons, (v) students, (vi) penting up, (vii) in Blake’s poem, (viii) summer days, (ix) The boy, (x) rescue.
    2. Ans.Or. (1) Having no learning friendly environment (2) play no caring and supportive role by the teacher (3) taken no care of the students with low caliber (4) not enjoying enough freedom by the students (5) crowded classroom (6) dour-faced teachers.

Set-6

  1. Read the passage and complete the table below: 10

The tests indicated that poultry feed in the country had also been contaminated, as samples of chicken and fish contained traces of antibiotics. High microbial populations were found in several samples of pasteurized milk, indicating poor processing procedures by the manufacturers. Samples of cucumber and street foods also showed high microbial populations, suggesting widespread contamination in the water supply. The Director of Institute of Public Health (IPH), told the Dhaka Tribune that the survey report has been submitted to the Health Ministry. Further tests of different products were being carried out at the Food Safety Lab. A former Director General of the Health Service and senior national adviser of the FAO, said the findings were shocking for the whole nation. He added that instead of focusing only on the end products, the issue should be addressed at the root level. Pointing out that there were four steps in the production process-farmer, transport, wholesale, and retail trader. He said better monitoring and supervision were mandatory for stopping food adulteration.
Adulterated food products are reportedly the cause behind thousands of people suffering from fatal diseases like cancer, kidney failure and heart problems. Health specialists told the Dhaka Tribute that the Ministry of Food had enacted a Food Safety Act, but was yet to prepare the necessary rules. As the issue of food safety was also linked to 14 other ministries, a coordinated agency should take responsibility of ensuring safety in food products, they added.

What/Who Source/Information What/Where When

Samples of (i) … poultry feed in the country (ii) … after testing

The manufactures in several (iii) … high microbial (iv) … after testing

Better monitoring and (v) … mandatory for stoping adulteration (vi) … always

Samples of (vii) … water supply (viii) … survey

(ix) … being carried out (x) … after the first test

Or. Read the above text and make a flow chart showing the steps of preventing food adulteration. 10

  1. Monitoring the food level of production 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-6

  1. Ans.(i) chicken and fish, (ii) traces of antibiotics, (iii) samples of pasteurized milk, (iv) populations, (v) supervision, (vi) in Dhaka, (vii) cucumber and street foods, (viii) high microbial populations, (ix) Further tests of different products, (x) the Food Safety Lab.
  2. Ans.Or. (1) Monitoring the food level of production (2) ensuring proper food processing (3) regular supervision (4) applying rules strictly (5) inflicting heavy punishment (6) forming a coordinated agency.


Set-7
2. Read the passage and complete the table below. 10

I caught sight of her at the play, and in answer to her beckoning, I went over during the interval and sat down beside her. It was long since I had last seen her, and if someone had not mentioned her name I hardly think I would have recognized her. She addressed me brightly. ‘Well, it’s many years since we first met. How time does fly! We’re none of us getting any younger. Do you remember the first time I saw you? You asked me to luncheon.’

Did I remember?

It was twenty years ago and I was living in Paris. I had a tiny apartment in the Latin quarter overlooking a cemetery, and I was earning barely enough money to keep body and soul together. She had read a book of mine and had written to me about it. I answered, thanking her, and presently I received from her another letter saying that she was passing through Paris and would like to have a chat with me; but her time was limited, and the only free moment she had was on the following Thursday; she was spending the morning at the Luxembourg and would I give her a little luncheon at Foyot’s afterwards? Foyot’s is a restaurant at which the French senators eat, and it was so far beyond my means that I had never even thought of going there. But I was flattered, and I was too young to have learned to say no to a woman…. I had eighty francs (gold francs) to last me the rest of the month, and a modest luncheon should not cost more than fifteen. If I cut out coffee for the next two weeks I could manage well enough. 

I answered that I would meet my friend-by correspondence at Foyot’s Thursday at half-past twelve. She was not so young as I expected and in appearance imposing rather than attractive. She was, in fact, a woman of forty… and she gave me the impression of having more teeth, white and large and even, than were necessary for any practical purpose. She was talkative, but since she seemed inclined to talk about me I was prepared to be an attentive listener.

Who/What Event/Activity Where/Place When/How long

The writer caught sight of the lady guest (i) .… 20 years after the lunch at Foyot’s.

(ii) .… sat down beside her (iii) .…

The writer (iv) .… in Paris (v) .…

The Lady requested the writer to give her a lunch (vi) .… on Thursday,

(vii) .… usually cat at Foyot’s often.

The writer (viii) .… in his pocket. 

The writer wanted to meet the lady at Foyot’s (ix) .…

(x) .… was a woman of forty.

  1. Or. Based on your reading of the passage, make short notes in each of the boxes in the flow-chart showing the information about the lady entertained by the writer. 10
  2. Not so young as expected by the writer 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-7

  1. Ans. (i) at the play (ii) The writer (iii) during the interval (iv) was living (v) 20 years ago (vi) at Foyot’s (vii) French senators (viii) had eighty francs (ix) on Thursday at half-past twelve (x) The lady.
    2. Ans. Or. 1. Not so young as expected by the writer 2. Imposing rather than attractive in appearance 3. A woman of forty 4. Gave the impression of having more teeth than were necessary for any practical purpose 5. Talkative 6. Seemed inclined to talk about the writer.

  2. Read the passage and complete the table below: 10

I was startled when the bill of fare was brought, for the prices were a great deal higher than I had anticipated. But she reassured me. ‘I never eat anything for luncheon,’ she said. ‘Oh, don’t say that!’ I answered generously. ‘I never eat more than one thing. I think people eat far too much nowadays. A little fish, perhaps. I wonder if they have any salmon.’ Well, it was early in the year for salmon and it was not on the bill of fare, but I asked the waiter if there was any. Yes, a beautiful salmon had just come in, it was the first they had had. I ordered it for my guest.

The waiter asked her if she would have something while it was being cooked. ‘No,’ she answered, ‘I never eat more than one thing unless you have a little caviare, I never mind caviare.’ My heart sank a little. I knew I could not afford caviare, but I could not very well tell her that. I told the waiter by all means to bring caviare. For myself I chose the cheapest dish on the menu and that was a mutton chop.
‘I think you are unwise to eat meat,’ she said. ‘I don’t know how you can expect to work after eating heavy things chops. I don’t believe in overloading my stomach.’

Then came the question of drink. ‘I never drink anything for luncheon,’ she said. ‘Neither do I,’ I answered promptly. ‘Except white wine,’ she proceeded as though I had not spoken. ‘These French white wines are so light. They’re wonderful for the digestion.’ ‘What would you like?’ I asked, hospitable still, but not exactly emotional.

She gave me a bright and amicable flash of her white teeth. ‘My doctor won’t let me drink anything but champagne.’ I imagine I turned a little pale. I ordered half a bottle. I mentioned casually that my doctor had absolutely forbidden me to drink champagne. ‘What are you going to drink, then?’ ‘Water.’

Who/What Event/Activity Where/Place When/How long

The writer (i) …. at Foyot’s when the bill of fare was brought

(ii) …. never eats more than one thing at lunch

The lady guest thinks people eat far too much (iii) ….

Salmon was not shown (iv) …. Early in the season

(v) …. had come In the restaurant Just then

The lady guest (vi) …. while the salmon being cooked

(vii) …. was the cheapest dish on the menu

The lady guest took champagne (viii) ….

The writer (ix) …. at Foyot’s (x) ….

  1. Or. Based on your reading of the passage, make short notes in each of the boxes in the flow-chart showing the names of food and drinks taken by the lady guest and the writer. 10
  2. Salmon fish 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-8

  1. Ans: (i) was startled (ii) The lady guest (iii) nowadays (iv) on the bill of fare (v) a beautiful salmon (vi) wanted to have caviare (vii) Mutton chop (viii) at Foyot’s (ix) took water (x) at lunch.
    2. Or. Ans: (1) Salmon fish (2) caviare (3) mutton chop (4) French white wine (5) champagne (6) water.

Set-9

  1. Read the passage and complete the table below. 10

I was past caring now. So I ordered coffee for myself and an ice cream and coffee for her. ‘You know, there’s one thing I thoroughly believe in,’ she said, as she ate the ice cream, ‘One should always get up from a meal feeling one could eat a little more.’ ‘Are you still hungry?’ I asked faintly. ‘Oh, no, I’m not hungry; you see , I don’t eat luncheon. I have a cup of coffee in the morning and then dinner, but I never eat more than one thing for luncheon. I was speaking for you.’ ‘Oh, I see!’ Then a terrible thing happened. While we were waiting for the coffee, the head waiter, with an ingratiating smile on his false face, came up to us bearing a large basket full of huge peaches. They had the blush of an innocent girl; they had the rich tone of an Italian landscape. But surely peaches were not in season then? Lord knew what they cost. ‘You see, you’ve filled your stomach with a lot of meat’ – my one miserable little chop- ‘and you can’t eat any more. But I’ve just had a snack and I shall enjoy a peach’.
The bill came and when I paid it I found that I had only enough for a quite inadequate tip. Her eyes rested for an instant on the three francs I left for the waiter, and I knew that she thought me mean. But when I walked out of the restaurant I had the whole month before me and not a penny in my pocket. ‘Follow my example,’ she said as we shook hand, and never eat more than one thing for luncheon. ‘I’ll do better than that’, I retorted. ‘I’ll eat nothing for dinner to-night.’ ‘Humorist!’ she cried gaily, jumping into a cab, ‘you’re quite a humorist!’ But I have had my revenge at last. I do not believe that I am a vindictive man, but when the immortal gods take a hand in the matter it is pardonable to observe the result with complacency. Today she weighs twenty-one stone.

Who/What Event/Activity Where/Place When/How long

One should get up feeling one could eat a little more from a meal (i)…………………..

(ii)……………. would have a coffee in the morning.

The head waiter (iii)…………………………… while they were waiting for coffee.

The head waiter Had an ingratiating smile (iv)………….

(v)… had the blush of an innocent girl.

The eyes of the lady guest (vi)… on the three francs for an instant.

The waiter (vii)… in his pocket when he walked out of the restaurant.

(viii)… would eat nothing for dinner that night.

The writer has had his revenge (ix)…

The lady guest (x)… today.

  1. Or. Based on your reading of the passage, make short notes in each of the boxes in the flow-chart showing the information about the peaches. 10
  2. The head waiter came up to them with the peaches 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-9

  1. Ans. (i) always (ii) The lady guest (iii) came with a basket of peach (iv) on his false face (v) The peaches (vi) rested (vii) did not have a penny (viii) The writer (ix) at last (x) weighs twenty-one stone.
    2. Ans. Or. 1. The head waiter came up to them with the peaches. 2. The peaches were huge. 3. They had the blush of an innocent girl. 4. They had the rich tone of an Italian landscape. 5. Peaches were not in season then. 6. The writer wondered about their cost.

Set-10

  1. Read the passage and complete the table below. 10

Shilpi was only 15 years old when she married Rashid in 2008. Marrying off daughters at an early age is a standard practice for many families living in rural Bangladesh. After her wedding, Shilpi joined a local empowerment group that provides adolescent girls with the tools needed to gradually change cultural practices, particularly those pertaining to early marriage and pregnancy. The group’s activities include discussions on how to most effectively change behaviour related to reproductive health as well as one-on- one counseling. It also offers peer-to-peer support and life skills training that help adolescents say no to early marriage. The empowerment group is one of more then 10,000 groups supported by some local Non Government Organizations (NGOs) working all over Bangladesh. These NGOs work through Canada’s Adolescent Reproductive Health Project which also aims to increase access to quality health services for adolescents. During one of the group sessions, Shilpi came to understand the potentially harmful effects of early marriage and pregnancy.
While maternal mortality in Bangladesh has declined by nearly 40 percent since 2001, the rate remains high with 194 maternal deaths per 100,000, live births in 2010- dropping from 322 in 2001 with a projected decrease to 143 by 2015. Girls who get pregnant are at risk of serious health complications. These include dangerous hemorrhage and fistula, a painful internal injury caused by obstructed childbirth that commonly leads to serious maternal morbidities and social exclusion. When Shilpi heard about those risks, she invited her husband, Rashid, to discuss pregnancy with a counselor. After hearing about the risks, Rashid agreed to delay having children for five years despite pressures from his parents and neighbors to produce an offspring. Together, the couple met with a female health care provider, who informed them about the various family planning options available.
Shilpi’s mother-in-law and neighbors continued to pressurize the newlyweds. Deeply rooted cultural practices and traditions caused a rift between Shilpi and Rashid and their extended family, some of whose members insulted and criticized the couple. Unable to convince their close relatives of the risks, Shilpi and Rashid returned to the counselor. They took the help of a parent peer who has been trained to speak to other parents about adolescent issues. Shilpi’s mother-in-law and neighbors eventually came to understand the harmful effects of early pregnancy on mother and child. Today, the village no longer pressurizes the couple; their parents and neighbors now support them and speak out against early marriage and pregnancy.

What/Who Source/Event What/Where When/Information

Shilpi (i) … Rashid 15 years old (ii) …

(iii) … come to know group session (iv) … about early marriage

and pregnancy

The (v) … supported by Canada’s peer-to-peer support during

Adolescent Reproductive

Health Project

The NGO’s (vii) … is providing girls quality health services during (viii) …

The adolescent girls are provided by local (ix) … tools needed to one-on-one counseling.

gradually change (x) …

Or. Read the above text and make a flow chart showing the reasons of early marriage in Bangladesh.

10

  1. To establish cultural practice 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-10

  1. Ans. (i) married, (ii) 2008 (iii) She, (iv) harmful effects, (v) empowerment group, (vi) adolescence, (vii) aim, (viii) adolescence, (ix) empowerment group, (x) cultural practice.
  2. Ans.Or. (1) To establish cultural practice (2) considering daughter as burden (3) unconscious about the bad effect of early marriage

(4) unhealthy cultural practice (5) lack of standard education

(6) superstitious beliefs.

Set-11

  1. Read the passage and complete the table below: 10

Universities should never be made into mechanical organizations for collecting and distributing knowledge. Through them the people should offer their intellectual hospitality, their wealth of mind to others, and earn their proud right in return to receive gifts from the rest of the world. But in the whole length and breadth of India there is not a single University established in the modern time where a foreign or an Indian student can properly be acquainted with the best products of the Indian mind. For that we have to cross the sea, and knock at the doors of France and Germany. 

Educational institutions in our country are India’s alms-bowl of knowledge; they lower our intellectual self-respect; they encourage us to make a foolish display of decorations composed of borrowed feathers….Man’s intellect has a natural pride in its own aristocracy, which is the pride of its culture. Culture only acknowledges the excellence whose criticism is in its inner perfection, not in any external success. 
When this pride succumbs to some compulsion of necessity or lure of material advantage, it brings humiliation to the intellectual man. Modern India, through her very education, has been made to suffer this humiliation. Once she herself provided her children with a culture which was the product of her own ages of thought and creation. But it has been thrust aside, and we are made to tread the mill of passing examinations, not for learning anything, but for notifying that we are qualified for employments under organizations conducted in English. Our educated community is not a cultured community, but a community of qualified candidates.
 

Meanwhile the proportion of possible employments to the number of claimants has gradually been growing narrower, and the consequent disaffection has been widespread. At last the very authorities who are responsible for this are blaming their victims. Such is the perversity of human nature. It bears its worst grudge against those it has injured…

Who/What Event/Activity Where/Place When

A single University upholding the Indian mind. (i)… in India (ii)…

(iii)… are our alms-bowl of knowledge (iv)… 

Man’s intellect (v)… in its own aristocracy. 

(vi)… provided her children with a culture (vii)…

We are educated only to qualify to work (viii)… 

Our educated community (ix)… 

(x)… is increasing in proportion to employments in India day by day.

Or, Based on your reading of the passage, make short notes in each of the boxes in the flow-chart showing the information about an Eastern University. 10

  1. Mechanical organization for collecting and distributing knowledge 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-11

  1. Ans. (i) is not established (ii) in the modern time (iii) Educational institutions (iv) in India (v) has a natural pride (vi) India herself (vii) once (viii) in organizations conducted in English (ix) is not a cultured community (x) The number of claimants.
  2. Ans. Or. 1. Mechanical organization for collecting and distributing knowledge 2. Does not offer the intellectual hospitality to other 3. Cannot show the best products of the Indian mind 4. Alms-bowl of knowledge 5. Lowers our intellectual self-respect 6. Encourages a foolish display of decorations composed of borrowed feathers.


Set-12
2. Read the passage and complete the table below. 10

In the Bengali language there is a modern maxim which can be translated, ‘He who learns to read and write rides in a carriage and pair.’ In English there is a similar proverb, ‘Knowledge is power.’ It is an offer of a prospective bribe to the student, a promise of an ulterior reward which is more important than knowledge itself… Unfortunately, our very educational has been successful in depriving us of our real initiative and our courage of thought. The training we get in our schools has the constant implication in it that it is not for us to produce but to borrow. And we are casting about to borrow our educational plans from European institutions. The trampled plants of Indian corn are dreaming of recouping their harvest from the neighboring wheat fields. To change the figure, we forget that, for proficiency in walking, it is better to train the muscles of our own legs than to strut upon wooden ones of foreign make, although they clatter and cause more surprise at our skill in using them than if they were living and real.

But when we go to borrow help from a foreign neighborhood we overlook the fact…that among the Europeans the living spirit of the University is widely spread in their society, their parliament, their literature, and the numerous activities of their corporate life. In all these functions they are in perpetual touch with the great personality of the land which is creative and heroic in its constant acts of self-expression and self-sacrifice. They have their thoughts

published in their books as well as through the medium of living men who think those thoughts, and who criticize, compare and disseminate them. Some at least of the drawbacks of their academic education are redeemed by the living energy of the intellectual personality pervading their social organism. It is like the stagnant reservoir of water which finds its purification in the showers of rain to which it keeps itself open. But, to our misfortune, we have in India all the furniture of the European University except the human teacher…

Who/what Event/Activity Where/Place when

He who learns to read and write rides (i)…

(ii)… has been successful in depriving us of our real initiative and our courage of thought.
‘It is not for us to produce but to borrow’ is what we learn (iii)…

(iv)… borrow our educational plans (v)…

Among the Europeans the living spirit of the University (vi)… in their society their parliament, their literature, and the numerous activities of their corporate life.

(vii)… have their thoughts published (viii)…

(ix)… have all the furniture of the European University except the human teacher (x)…

2.Or, Based on your reading of the passage, make short notes in each of the boxes in the flow-chart showing the lacking of our education. 10

  1. Depriving us of our real initiative 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-12

  1. Ans.(i) in a carriage (ii) Our education (iii) in our schools (iv) We (v) from European institutions (vi) is widely spread (vii) The Europeans (viii) in their books (ix) We (x) in India.
    2.Ans. Or. 1. Depriving us of our real initiative 2. Depriving us of our courage of thought 3. The constant implication of our inability to produce something 4. We cannot but borrow from others 5. Our educational plans are borrowed from European institutions 6. Lack of the human teacher.

 

Part-1Set-13

  1. Read the passage and complete the table below. 10

Tertiary education in Bangladesh comprises two categories of institutions : degree awarding universities and colleges affiliated with the National University (NU). There were only 4 universities in Bangladesh at the time of independence in 1971. All of those universities were publicly financed autonomous entities. At present, there are 35 such universities. Private universities are a relatively new phenomenon in this country. In the early 1990s, the private sector came forward to establish universities. Since then the country has experienced a spectacular growth in private universities–mostly in and around Dhaka and couple of other large cities. At present, there are 79 private universities. The number of colleges providing tertiary level education is around 1,400. Most of them offer BA (pass) education of three year duration; only one-third of them offer BA (Honors) courses and some offer MA degrees as well. All of these colleges are affiliated with the National University.
Accessibility to higher education implies that students get the opportunity to get university education and sufficient support from educational institutions. Increasing enrolment at the secondary and higher secondary level puts pressure on higher educational institutions. But due to limited capacity, only a small number of students may be enrolled in universities. Thus, each year a large number of students are denied access to higher

education. Also, due to poverty and increase in educational

expenses, students of the lower middle class do not get easy access to higher education. Moreover, those who get places in the universities have limited access to avail all kinds of diversified educational facilities relating to their study fields. Only about 12 percent of graduates enter higher educational institutions. More than 80 Percent of these students are admitted to NU affiliated colleges. Others are absorbed by the public and private universities. In the last two decades, there has been a substantial rise in the number of students in private universities. According to the UGC Annual Report 2010, the number rose from 88,669 in 2005 to 2,00,752 in 2010.

Who/What Event/Activity Where/Place When

(i)… comprises two categories of institutions in Bangladesh

Four universities were (ii)… at the time of independence in 1971.

35 public universities are in Bangladesh (iii)…

Private universities (iv)… in this country

(v)… came forward to establish universities in the early 1990s.

The country has experienced a growth in private universities. (vi)…

Only about 12 percent of graduates (vii)… higher educational institutions.

More than 80 percent of these students are admitted to (viii)…

(ix)… is 2,00,752 in private universities (x)…

  1. Or. Based on your reading of the passage, make short notes in each of the boxes in the flow-chart showing the characteristics of public universities. 10
  2. Scope of studying on a wide range of subjects 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-13

  1. Ans. (i) Tertiary education (ii) in Bangladesh (iii) at present (iv) are a relatively new phenomenon (v) The private sector (vi) in and around Dhaka (vii) enter (viii) NU affiliated colleges (ix) The number of students (x) in 2010.
  2. Or. Ans. 1. Scope of studying on a wide range of subjects. 2. Attracting the best minds for teaching. 3. Better library, laboratory, Internet and research facilities. 4. Regular seminars, symposiums, lectures, workshops, debates and exhibitions. 5. Ample scope for national and international exposure. 6. Residential and boarding facilities at low cost/subsidized rates.

 

Set-14
2. Read the passage and complete the table below. 10

My name is Amerigo. I am 13 years old and I live on the street, alone. My mother, who is separated from my father, doesn’t want me. She told me to go away…Now she is married to another man. My father lives very far away. I want to go to him, but he won’t take me either. I begged him to send me some money so that I could buy a bus ticket. I am still waiting. He hasn’t answered.
The streets are now my home. Sometimes I find work. I used to collect trash and sell it to a vendor. I stopped doing that after I had a serious infection and a doctor told me to stay away from the trash dump. Once I worked for an ice cream shop owner and sold ice cream on the beach. But I got no money in return. The owner of the shop gave me something to eat, and let me sleep in his hut at night. The work was difficult and painful. The ice cream box is quite heavy when it is full. I had to walk for hours, offering my ice cream to whoever wanted to buy. There were days when I could not even sell one ice cream. In a way, I am lucky because I am alive. My friends who work sorting rubbish in dumps often suffer from serious diseases. One of them was recently killed after he fell into a hole that opened up in the pile of trash. Many of us work for 10 to 12 hours, and get so little in return that we can’t even buy food.
Shoe-shining is very popular among the street kids. A few of my friends also work in factories and workshops. A boy I know lost one of his eyes after a piece of hot glass flew into his eye at the glass factory where he worked. The owner refused to pay for medical help and fired him. For me, like all other children on the street, it is very hard. I am always hungry, and I don’t know where I will sleep the next night. I would like to live in my own home and sleep there in peace. The nights are very cold in the winter. You can die of cold in the street.

What/Who Event/Information What/Where When

Amerigo, 13 years old boy live (i) …

(ii) …
lives very far away since the separation with his mother

Amerigo’s home The street (iii) …

Amerigo sold ice cream (iv) …

(v) … let Amerigo sleep in his hut At night

Amerigo’s friends who work sorting rubbish (vi) … In dumps (vii) …

Amerigo would like to live (viii) …

The nights (ix) … in the winter

(x) … can die of cold In the street

  1. Or. Read the above text and make a flow chart showing the problems the street children usually face.

No. 1 has been done for you. 10

  1. serious diseases as a result of working with trash 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-14

Ans. 2. (i) on the street (ii) Amerigo’s father (iii) now (iv) on the beach (v) The owner of the ice cream shop (vi) suffer from serious diseases (vii) often (viii) in his own home (ix) are very cold (x) the street children.
Ans. 2. Or. (1) serious diseases as a result of working with trash (2) working 10 to 12 hours a day (3) earning very little, even not enough to buy food (4) hazardous working environment in factories and workshops (5) no specific place for passing the night (6) no protection from cold winter nights.

 

  1. Read the passage below and complete the table. 10

Water, water, everywhere,

And all the boards did shrink;

Water, water, everywhere,

Nor any drop to drink.

Coleridge’s poem, a ballad, narrates the harrowing sea-voyage of an old mariner who at one point of his journey didn’t have any water to drink because of a curse. Cursed or not, we know how important drinking water is in our life. We know we cannot survive without it. In fact two-thirds of our body is made up of water. Not for nothing is it said that the other name of water is life. Is there a crisis in our time with regard to access to clean drinking water? The United Nations in a meeting on the eve of the new millennium identified the drinking water problem as one of the challenges for the future. But do we need to worry about the problem as ours is a land of rivers and we have plenty of rainfall? Besides, we have a sea in our backyard too.

One of the sources of water in our country is the rivers. Rivers are everywhere in our life, literature, economy and culture. But are the rivers in good shape? Unfortunately, they are not. A few are already dead and several are going through the pangs of death. The river Buriganga is an example of a dying river. A report published in the Daily Sun describes what has happened to the river Buriganga and why. It’s water is polluted and a perpetual stench fills the air around it. But that is not what it was like before. The report says that the river had a glorious past. Once it was a tributary of the mighty Ganges and flowed into the Bay of Bengal through the river Dhaleshwari. Gradually, it lost its link with the Ganges and got the name Buriganga. The Mughals marveled at the tide level of the Buriganga and founded their capital Jahangirnagar on its banks in 1610. The river supplied drinking water and supported trade and commerce. Jahangirnagar was renamed Dhaka which grew into a heavily populated city with a chronic shortage of space. The city paid back the bounty of the river by sucking life out of it! According to newspaper report, the Buriganga is dying because of pollution. Huge quantities of toxic chemicals and wastes from mills and factories, hospitals and clinics and household and other establishments are dumped into the river everyday. The city of Dhaka discharges about 4500 tons of solid waste every day and most of it is directly released into the Buriganga. According to the Department of the Environment (DoE), 20,000 tons of tannery waste, including some highly toxic materials, are released into the river every day. Experts identified nine industrial areas in and around the capital city as the primary sources of river pollution: Tongi, Tejgaon, Hazaribagh, Tarabo, Narayanganj, Savar, Gazipur, Dhaka, Export Processing Zone and Ghorashal.

The river would need a monster’s stomach to digest all the wastes mentioned above. There is a limit up to which it can put up with its cruel and thoughtless treatment. We the humans have successfully killed one of our rivers. There are other rivers in the country that are being subjected to similar thoughtless treatment. Unless we take care of our rivers there may come a time when we will cry ‘water’ and find it nowhere.

What/Who Event / Information What / Where When

(i).………. marveled at the tide (ii).….. before 1610

The Mughals founded (iii).………. Jahangirnagar on its banks (iv).….

(v).……….. supplied (vi).…………

It’s water being polluted and (vii).……… the air around it (viii)….

(ix).………. was a tributary of (x).…………. once

  1. Or. Read the above text and make a flow chart showing why the river Buriganga was important in the past. 10
  2. Having a glorious past 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Answer to the ques. no. set-15

Ans. 2. (i) The Mughals, (ii) level of the Bauriganga, (iii) their capital, (iv) in 1610, (v) The Buriganga, (vi) drinking water, (vii) a filling, (viii) at present, (ix) The Buriganga, (x) the mighty Ganges.
Ans. 2. Or. (1) Having a glorious past (2) discharging tannery wastes (3) discharging medical wastes (4) discharging hospital wastes (5) discharging household wastes (6) encroachment of the river.

Class 9-10, First Paper, MATCHING, Model Questipns

Matching

Question No # 6 is matching parts of sentences in Column A and Column B. Primary grammatical knowledge and understanding the meaning of the parts of sentences help greatly to master over this item. Here are some examples worked out.

 1. Match the parts of sentences given in column ‘A’ and column  ‘B’ to write five complete sentences. There are more parts of sentences in column ‘B’ than required

Column A Column B Column C
a) We should i) persons are not only dishonest i) but also harmful for our society
b) Corrupt ii) high time we ii) we do not think of the welfare of our country
c) Now it is iii) so self-centered that iii) did something against corruption
d) We should iv) say ‘no’ to corruption iv) because it is a serious social crime
e) But we are v) work together if v) we want to control corruption

2. Match the parts of sentences given in column ‘A’ and column ‘B’ to write five complete sentences. There are more parts of sentences in column ‘B’ than required.               

Column A Column B Column C
a) Bangladesh is blessed i) an ecologically critical area i) and Kulaura railway to the west
b) Hakaluki haor is ii) the Khshiara river to the north ii) open water resources
c) With a vast land area it iii) one of the major iii) in April 1999 by the govt.
d) This haor was declared iv) with huge inland iv) hand livelihood to many people
e) It is bounded by v) supports a rich biodiversity v) wetlands of Bangladesh

Match the phrases in the substitution table to make sensible sentences .Write out the sentences in full.

A B C
(i)Farmers have to in india and cyclone about 2,500 years ago
(ii)Irrigation is easy irrigate their fields for dry seasons
(iii)Canals carry enough if there is a great when there is very littke rain
(iv)Dams have been built the river water river near the fields
(v)A dam across a river is built to store water to the fields when necessary

 

A B C
(i)The arsenic problem of Bangladesh usually suffer slow and agonizing deaths
(ii)In chemistry arsenic has become acute causing them trouble
(iii)The element is detected refferered to as in recent years
(iv)Victims do not even to be present in large quantities a white compound of brittle elements
(v)Suffering people of arsenic know what is in the underground water

 

A B C
(i)English has  become an English make them competent for the competitive world
(ii)People learn English international language that aims at having development for every nation
(iv)People adopt different exactly can reach makes a man successful
(v)Those who learn policies to make their the culmination of success
(vi)English is essential for globalization that English outstanding

 

A B C
(i)Socrates was two charges against socrates
(ii)He wanted to a great philosopher his popularity
(iii)The young men began spread knowledge of ancient Greece
(iv)The rulers of  Athens grew to gather among the people
(v)They brought jealous of round him

     

A B C
(i)Khan Jahan Ali found as one of the artchitechual beauties of the country
(ii)He built Bagerhat beset with and a court of khan jhan ali
(iii)The Shat  Gambuj Mosque numerous mosques various problems
(iv)It was used is the most magnificent in Bagerhat
(v)The Mosque is regarded both as a prayer hall of them

 

A B C
(i)Humans,animals and plants we cannot protect our environment from being spoilt
(ii)But humans are carefully are all equally important elements in the last few decades
(iii)Various plants and animals destroying of our environment
(iv)Many wild animals and birds are faced with the threat plants and animals
(v)If we do not care for our wild life have vanished from the earth of extinction today

 

A B C
(i)The Sundarbans with its 6,000 sq km of the number of preys felling of trees in the forest areas
(ii)The tigers hunt on canals and creeks is are responsible for the diminishing of tigers.
(iii)This noctournal their own located in the south of Bangladesh
(vi)The main reason for their extinction hunts only when it is and not in a pack
(v)Illegal poaching and the decrease in is the uncontrolled hungry or feels threatend

 

Column A Column B Column C
a) Man’s learning cannot i) the elders is an act of i) learning good manners
b) Childhood is the ii) sense of decency in ii) our dealing with others
c) Smoking in presence of iii) be complete without iii) disapprobation of good manners
d) What is assumed as good iv) manners in a country may not iv) acquisition of good manners
e) We should have the v) proper time for v) be the same in another country

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Donation of blood (i) sound health can donate (i) we donate blood, we blood invite no harm to us
(b) In our society, some of us nourish (ii) enough to save (ii) after every 3 months without any side effect
(c) As per medical science, every man in (iii) a crystal clear idea that if (iii) be a very noble deed
(d) We should have (iv) a misconception about blood donation which

conveys

(iv) the life of a dying person
(e) Sometimes, a bag of our blood is (v) is universally acknowledged to (v) a negative message for  the others

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) There are many (i) in our country in respect (i) of the natural beauty
(b) Cox’s Bazar (ii) come to visit this (ii) sea beach every year
(c) Cox’s Bazar (iii) nice places (iii) in Bangladesh
(d) It is a remarkable place (iv) sea beach (iv) place among them
(e) Many people (v) is the most beautiful (v) is very charming

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Our Parliament House   spectacular (i) by an artificial lake called (i) in 1982
(b) It has been designed (ii) is one of the most (ii) buildings in the world
(c) The building is (iii) was held in February in (iii) the same year surrounded
(d) It (iv) was inaugurated (iv) Louis I Kahn
(e) The first parliamentary (v) by a famous American (v) Crescent Lake session architect

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Morality develops the  conscience (i) himself in a proper way and cultivate (i) which cannot ignore logic and reason
(b) It helps a man guide (ii) is increasing and we are losing (ii) and right or wrong
(c) It is such a great natural power (iii) from our childhood, we shall (iii)  invaluable virtue of morality
(d) But nowadays, moral erosion (iv) that it grows naturally in human behaviour (iv) fall in every aspect of life
(e) if we do not practise morality (v) by which man can judge good or bad (v) all the virtues to become a good man

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a)Your friends cannot help (i) that makes us (i)in everyone
(b)It is love (ii) loving you (ii) you don’t love others
(c)Love is divine (iii) to love you (iii) feel for others
(d)You cannot find others (iv) it is a good evidence that (iv) if you love them
(e)If you are not loved (v) which exists (v) unless you love them

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Education means s (i) conscious of our rights (i) the individual
(b) The purpose of education (ii) frees a man (ii) removing the darkness
(c) Education makes you (iii) aims at (iii) from restrictions
(d) Education (iv) is to enlighten (iv) from any educational institution
(e) Education (v) the receiving of formal learning (v) and responsibilities

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Sonargaon was (i) had a reputation for (i) dwelling place in the19th century
(b) The importance of the city (ii) many beautiful buildings on (ii) during the Sultani period
(c) The place at that time (iii) the capital of Bengal (iii) both sides of the road
(d) Many businessmen selected (iv) declined during (iv) the manufacture of Muslin Saree
(e) They built (v) Sonargaon as their (v) the next Mughal period

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) The moon (i) has no light (i) the gift of the sun
(b) She (ii) the moon reflects (ii) a small fraction of brightness
(c) The sun (iii) has an appeal (iii) vast flood of light
(d) To illuminate the earth (iv) light depends on (iv) of her own
(e) The moon’s (v) pours forth a (v) on poets and artists

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Drug addiction means strong attraction (i) and stimulating effects which tremendously tell (i) a global problem
(b) It is now not only (ii) that especially the young boys are taking (ii) are bound to commit  crimes to arrange money
(c) In fact, drugs are used basically for intoxicating (iii) for some particular sorts of drugs (iii) heroin, opium,  phensidyl and so on
(d) It is observed with great concern  (iv) cannot buy these drugs and (iv) which are harmful to our body and mind
(e) These boys, being unemployed, (v) a national but also (v) upon our body and mind alike

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Substances called acids (i) be very acidic in (i) and damage to human health
(b) Ordinary rain water (ii) are at risk (ii) known as acidity
(c) But rain can (iii) between acid rain (iii) slightly acidic
(d) There is a link (iv) is (iv) due to severe acid rain
(e) Many world famous buildings (v) have a sharp taste (v) severely polluted areas

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) The role of women in nation-building (ii)  women were looked upon  (ii)   to play their active role
(b) It is not possible for any nation to reach (ii) the only instruments (ii) towards women has been changed
(c) There was a time when (iii) cannot be denied any more (iii) to serve the family affairs
(d) They were (iv) the outlook and attitude of (iv) in the situation of the the world
(e) But with the progress of  (v) its goal without allowing the (v) without any dignity and womenfolk

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) The Nobel Prize, awarded every year (i) with a gold medal, a certificate and (i) Medicine, Peace  and Economics
(b) It is awarded in six fields (ii) usually awarded (ii) distributed amongst all the winners
(c) The prize winner is provided (iii) for outstanding achievements, (iii) in each individual field.
(d) One prize is (iv) for the prize in one field,  the prize money is equally (iv) is the world’s most important and prestigious prize 
(e) If there are more than one recipient (v) like Physics, Chemistry,  Literature, (v) a large sum of money

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) 21 February is a red-letter day. (i) the whole world is’ observing 21st February (i) for its language except we, the Bengalis
(b) It is our pride because (ii) for the language martyrs who (ii) recognized as the International Mother Language Day
(c) The recognition of the day  (iii) no nation of the world has ever fought (iii) as the International Mother Language Day
(d) From the beginning of the 21st century, (iv) as the International Mother  Language Day by UNESCO (iv) laid down their lives for  establishing Bangla as state language
(e) This recognition is the  best reward (v) in our national history and this day has been (v) has ushered in a new era in our national history

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) In this world there is no   other word (i) the highest place and so we must never break (i) of mental world all  through our life on this earth
(b) We are related to our our mother  with such an affectionate (ii) this earth who loves us so dearly (ii) and affectionately as mother
(c) In fact, there is no other  person on (iii) which is so sweet and endearing (iii) our mother’s heart with  any sad or shocking action
d) She is a divine soul in the  form of (iv) human being and so she represents (iv) as the word ‘mother
(e) In every religion, mother  has been given (v) and spiritual bond that she covers a large part (v) heavenly love for us

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Smoking is undoubtedly a  bad habit (i) so that we can lead (i) and consequently suffer greatly
(b) Many people not realizing the bad effects of smoking (ii) which is harmful not only physically (ii) a healthy and happy life
(c) According to medical  science, (iii) but also all those who (iii) remain beside him
(d) Moreover, smoking harms  not only the smoker (iv) smoking causes various fatal diseases such as cancer, (iv) but also financially
(e) So, we must give up this (v) become chain-smokers (v) bronchitis, stroke, bad habit hypertension, etc.

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) We should say ‘no’ to (i) our craving for luxurious and comfortable life (i) destroys a nation corruption
(b) Corruption is not only  immoral but also harmful (ii) against corruption or we will be (ii) is ensuring rule of law
(c) Now, it is high time we  took stern action (iii) to our society as it slowly (iii) that hinders the  development of a society
(d) If we want to root out corruption, (iv) because it is a serious social crime (iv) marked as a corrupt  nation
(e) But we are so self centered because of the most necessary thing which we require to do that we do not think  of the welfare of the country

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Introverts and extroverts  are (i) are shy and they don’t like they are dominating  in nature
(b) They are considered (ii) but the extroverts don’t like (ii) talking too much
(c) People who are introvert (iii) opposite in nature from different perspectives (iii) to remain isolated
(d) On the other hand, (iv) as two opposite types of (iv) of their ways of life extroverts are
(e) Introverts like to live alone (v) usually outgoing, noisy and (v) personality of humanbeings

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Many diseases (i) it is due to (i) many more diseases
(b) Experts believe that (ii) is also responsible (ii) at an alarming rate
(c) Pollution appears (iii) to be greater (iii) in urban areas
(d) Today city people (iv) suffer from (iv) environment pollution
(e) Adulterated food (v) are rising (v) for affecting human beings

 

Column A Column B Column C
 (a) We can’t ensure (1) violated throughout the world (i) working for human  rights
 (b) Rights should be (ii)’ peace and prosperity (ii)without establishing human rights
(c) Human rights are (iii) Commission is an organization (iii) the privileged and the  underprivileged classes of people
(d) Violation of (iv) preserved for both (iv) and society should get rid of it
(e) Human Rights (v) human rights is a crime (v) because of violence

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Nowadays students are (i) for the better future of (i) in near future getting busy
(b) As a result, they cannot (ii) passing their time on Facebook (ii) indifferent to their  studies
(c) Their parents who struggle (iii) cut a good figure in the examination (iii) their children are worried about the matter
(d) The students are now seen (iv) with trifling matters and are seen (iv) doing nothing beneficial
(e) Thus, they waste their valuable time (v) unawarely and fall in problems (v) which is expected by the parents

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Bangladesh lies (i) gave warning (i) everybody of our country
(b) During recent years (ii) should be followed strictly (ii) earthquake zone
(c) The recurrence of quakes (iii) in the active (iii) at the time of building any house
(d) Experts (iv) earthquakes recur (iv) frequently in Bangladesh
(e) Earthquake resistant  building code (v) in recent years have frightened (v) regarding earthquake

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Facebook is an Internet  anywhere (i) Internet connection may (i) gain access to Facebook
(b) Nowadays, Facebook has  become (ii) using Facebook (ii) among people living anywhere
(c) It contributes much (iii) based social network (iii) to facilitate the official works
(d) People are also (iv) to maintain social and friendly relationship (iv) connecting people  worldwide
(e) Everybody having (v) an important part (v) of our daily life

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Humans, animals and (i) are faced with (i) the threat of extinction plants
(b) But humans (ii) have vanished from the environment (ii) elements of our earth
(c) Various plants and (iii) we cannot protect our environment (iii) from being spoilt animals
(d) Many wild animals and birds (iv) are cruelly destroying (iv) plants and animals
(e) If we don’t care for our wildlife, (v) are all equally important (v) in the last few decades

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Tolerance is not only an  abstract virtue (i) give and take is a necessary capacity (i) and co-operation with others in society
(b) Man, being a social being, (ii) is a social virtue which is opposed (ii) for compromise
(c) In such a process, (iii) but also a considerable influence (iii) to dogmatism and dictatorship
(d) We cannot persuade others unless (iv) we ourselves are at the same time ready to be (iv) in the current affairs of  life
(e) It is thus seen that tolerance (v) has to live in a spirit of harmony (v) persuaded by practising sweet and reasonableness

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) We observe the 21st February (i) at the foot of the Shaheed Minar barefooted (i) on all public and private buildings February
(b) On this important day, (ii) as the International Mother Language Day (ii) singing ‘Amar Bhaier Rokte Rangano Ekushey
(c) We also offer flowers (iii) as the Shaheed Day iii) by UNESCO
(d) The day was declared (iv) attend the morning procession (iv) with due respect and solemnity
(e) People from all walks of life spontaneously (v) our national flag is kept at half mast (v) to pay respect to the martyrs

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) A freedom fighter is honored  (i) and defeated the well trained (i) are called the freedom fighters
(b) The people of Bangladesh (ii) and the people who took part in the war (ii) for the cause of the motherland
(c) They fought for long nine months (iii) in all lands and in all times, because (iii) against the Pakistani occupation forces in 1971
d) The people who fought against the Pakistani army (iv) sacrificed their lives (iv) Pakistani forces
(e) Many of the freedom fighters (iv) fought a glorious War of Independence (v) he fights for a noble cause which is the freedom of the motherland

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) The Olympic Games (i) to a world festival and millions of people (i) long before the Christian era began
(b) The games were first held (ii) take place every four years and are participated (ii) the Town of Olympia in Greece
(c) A French man called Baron Pierre de Coubertin (iii) were named after (iii) all over the world enjoy them on television
(d) Nowadays, the Olympic  Games (iv) among the Greeks in  Olympia (iv) the Modern Olympic Games
(e) In fact, the Olympic Games  give rise (v) is the father of (v) by almost all the nations of the world

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) A book fair is an exhibition (i)literature, history, culture, science are displayed and sold
(b) People in large numbers (ii) a great attraction pay a visit to (ii) to buy some newly published books
(c) There are the books of (iii) a love of books and (iii) sports and religion
(d) It has become

 

(iv) “The Ekushey Boi Mela’ usually held in the Bangla

Academy premises

(iv) for the educated and cultured people

 

(e) It also instils where books of different writers (v) develops the habit of reading books

 

Column A Column B Column C
a) An ideal student is he (i) truthful and obedient to his superiors, (i) in order to make a good result in the exams
(b) He never mixes (ii) to read and plays (ii) parents and other superiors
(c) He sits to read when it is time (iii) who studies regularly, obeys his teachers, (iii) everyone loves him
(d) He always listens to his teachers and (iv) prepares his lessons regularly (iv) his valuable time in idleness
(e) As he is studious, industrious, (v) with bad boys and waste (v) when it is time to play

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Satellite television, as a cultural assault (i) to the developing nations
(b) Numerous TV channels (ii) are being affected (ii) new dimension to television
(c) But sometimes it has been branded (iii) makes the children (iii) more aggressive
(d) Sometimes our younger people (iv) has added (iv) types of programmes
(e) The exhibition of violence on TV (v)telecast various (v)by satellite television

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Democracy means (i) have right to elect (i) their representatives
(b) Democracy (ii) the rule of (ii) of democracy
(c) In democracy, people (iii) is a (iii) of speech
(d) Free and fair election (iv) encourages freedom (iv) democratic country
(e) Bangladesh (v) is the precondition (v) general people

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Democracy is (i) fair and equal (i) of democracy
(b) It allows freedom (ii) a system of (ii) in a democratic country
(c) It means (iii) of speech, religion (iii) government
(d) People elect (iv) their representatives direct (iv) and political opinions
(e) Free and fair (v) election is the precondition (v) treatment for citizens

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Truthfulness is the (i) habit of (i) speaking the truth
(b) We must cultivate the (ii) never win (ii) light
(c) Otherwise, we will (iii) lies hidden (iii) for long
(d) A lie never (iv) comes to (iv) human virtues
(e) Today or tomorrow it (v) greatest of all (v) the respect of others

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Globalization is a process  world and travel (i) can even share their joys (i) to its assistance of expanding and sorrows
 (b) With the development of (ii) in the farthest corner of the (ii) by creating a borderless market
 (c) We can now learn instantly  what is happening (iii) high-tech communication media and transportation facilities (iii) like next-door neighbours
 (d) The people of the world (iv) others can immediately, come (iv) to any country in the shortest possible time
(e) If one country is in (v) trade and commerce all (v) the world has come distress, over the world closer

 

Column A Column B Column C
 (a) Although smoking is (i) become addicted to it (i) to give it up
(b) People who smoke once (ii) because they think (ii) this bad habit anyhow
(c) As they become chain smokers, (iii) injurious to health, (iii) many people are addicted to it
(d) They smoke (iv) they have to give up (iv) they are benefitted by it
(e) If they want to lead a healthy life, (v) they find it difficult (v) and can’t give up this habit easily

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Our total environment (i) of the environment are (i) of the environment
(b) The main elements (ii) are disturbed, (ii) balanced and favourable
(c) There are relationships s (iii) influences our life (iii) and our way of living
(d) When these relationship (iv) to keep the environment (iv) men, animals, plants,soil, air and water
(e) So, it is our duty (v) among these elements (v) life becomes difficult or impossible

 

Column A Column B Column C
 (a) Email has brought about (i) cheaper than (i) this speedy made of communication
(b) Massage can be transmitted ii) has become greatly (ii) in modern dependent on communication
(c) It is far (iii) especially in developing (iii) like ours countries
(d) Trade and commerce (iv) a revolution (iv) within seconds
(e) It has however, not reached everyone (v) from one country to another (v) telephone calls

 

Column A Column B Column C
a) The Bangabandhu Satellite-1 (i) can be provided with (i) was launched on 11 May 2018 by Space X
(b) It was manufactured (ii) covers the whole South Asia (11) and thus can save a huge amount of foreign currency
(c) The satellite (iii) the cheap bandwidth and  frequency (iii) Internet service and  disaster-time aid easily
(d) Now, remote areas of the country (iv) is the first Bangladeshi (iv) including the Bay of Bengal
(e) Satellite TV channels can use (v) by Thales Alenia Space and (v) geostationary and communication satellite

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) We achieved our (i) symbolizes (i) the rising of the sun of independence
(b) Its red round part (ii) is the source of our spirit, (ii) hopes and aspirations
(c) As the sun is the source (iii) at any cost and save the existence (iii) of a sea of blood in 1971
(d) Our national flag (iv) national flag at the cost (iv) and dignity of our national flag.
(e) So, we must defend our independence  (v)of life on the earth, it also signifies (v) our glorious existence

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Humans (i) can control (i) in the burning of fossil fuels
(b) But they (ii) had been raised (ii) the sun’s radiation nor the earth’s orbit around the sun
(c) The carbon dioxide concentration (iii) lies (iii) the increase in the amount of greenhouse gases
(d) The main cause of the increase in carbon dioxide level in the atmosphere (iv) can neither change (iv) responsible for the alarming rise of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere
(e) We humans (v)are (v) alarmingly during the last hundred years

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) 21 February (i) we pay tribute (i) as International Mother Language Day
 (b) We observe the day (ii) in our national history (ii) to achieve our language rights
(c) On this day (iii) was sown (iii) is known as the Language Movement down their lives to establish Bangla as a state language
(d) The struggle (iv) is a memorable day (iv) on 21 March 1948
(e) The seed of the Language (v) every year Movement (v) to the martyrs who laid

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Hospitality (i) speaking to foreigners. (i) by asking personal questions
(b) People are very (ii) of the foreigners (ii) are interested in personal affairs
(c) They like (iii) is meant ( iii) towards foreigners
(d) The Bangladeshis (iv) has long been a part (iv) of our culture in Bangladesh
(e) No harm (v) even without being introduced (v) polite and friendly

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Drug (i) hope left for the  (i) leads a man to death
(b) When there is no (ii) of drug is (ii) in Bangladesh
(c) The frequent (iii) is acute (iii) brain
(d) The effect (iv) damages (iv) very poisonous
(e) Drug problem (v) taking of drugs (v) young people, they get addicted to drug

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Human beings (i) have responsibility (i) for ecological imbalance
(b) We (ii) are responsible (ii) for preventing the environment pollution and danger-free
(c) Many factors (iii) are caused (iii) ecological imbalance
(d) Natural disasters (iv) are the results of (iv) the environment clean
(e) The changes in the world climate (v) should keep (v) by ecological imbalance

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) When someone comes  to (i) Ceylon, Teardrop of India, (i) the gift of long life
(b) This word means (ii) the richness and beauty (ii) everyone is welcomed to Sri Lanka
(c) It is with this (iii) Sri Lanka, they may often (iii) of this island nation
(d) Sri Lanka has many nicknames which are Serendip (iv) traditional greeting that (iv) hear the word Ayubowan
(e) These names reveal (v) may you have (v) Pearl of the Indian Ocean, etc.

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Women in rural Bangladesh (i) training rural women. the benefits of laudable project
(b) They are compelled  (ii) has launched a project (ii) for employment of rural women
(c) Recently, the ILO (iii) have started reaping (iii) outside the home
(d) The project aims at (iv) have very few opportunities of work (iv) in doing household chores
(e) Very poor women (v) to spend their whole life (v) in various economic activities

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) We must acknowledge our (i) we discovered debt (i) the endless mystery of nature
(b) The first lesson (ii) we learned (ii) and then to nature
(c) They taught us (iii) to the parents (iii) to arrange everything in order
(d) But when we come out of (iv) the Creator is our house, (iv) was from our parents
(e) We wondered how graceful (v) how to eat, (v) how to talk and how to live

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Our world is becoming (i) is the latest invention (i) and collect necessary information
(b) Now a man from one part of the world (ii) with anybody in any place or even a person with the blessings of science
(c) Internet communication (iii) can communicate with a person of another part (iii) in a second through the Internet
(d) A man can make friendship (iv) can use the London Library (iv) in the communication system
(e) A student sitting in the reading room (v) smaller day by day (V) choose life partner through Internet

 

Column A Column B Column C
 (a) Science has made (i) keep indoors and spend (i) time on computer or TV
(b) In the past, after (ii) outlook is also (ii) in the field in the afternoon
(c) But children at present (iii) school hours, we would play (iii) different from ours
(d) They do not enjoy (iv) the sunset or even the (iv) what it was in the past
(e) This is why, their (v) our life different from (v) beauty of a moonlit night

 

Column A Column B Column C
a) The Bangabandhu Satellite-1 (i) can be provided with (i) was launched on 11 May 2018 by Space X
(b) It was manufactured (ii) covers the whole South Asia (11) and thus can save a huge amount of foreign currency
(c) The satellite (iii) the cheap bandwidth and  frequency (iii) Internet service and  disaster-time aid easily
(d) Now, remote areas of the country (iv) is the first Bangladeshi (iv) including the Bay of Bengal
(e) Satellite TV channels can use (v) by Thales Alenia Space and (v) geostationary and communication satellite

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) We achieved our (i) symbolizes (i) the rising of the sun of independence
(b) Its red round part (ii) is the source of our spirit, (ii) hopes and aspirations
(c) As the sun is the source (iii) at any cost and save the existence (iii) of a sea of blood in 1971
(d) Our national flag (iv) national flag at the cost (iv) and dignity of our national flag.
(e) So, we must defend our independence  (v)of life on the earth, it also signifies (v) our glorious existence

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Humans (i) can control (i) in the burning of fossil fuels
(b) But they (ii) had been raised (ii) the sun’s radiation nor the earth’s orbit around the sun
(c) The carbon dioxide concentration (iii) lies (iii) the increase in the amount of greenhouse gases
(d) The main cause of the increase in carbon dioxide level in the atmosphere (iv) can neither change (iv) responsible for the alarming rise of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere
(e) We humans (v)are (v) alarmingly during the last hundred years

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) 21 February (i) we pay tribute (i) as International Mother Language Day
 (b) We observe the day (ii) in our national history (ii) to achieve our language rights
(c) On this day (iii) was sown (iii) is known as the Language Movement down their lives to establish Bangla as a state language
(d) The struggle (iv) is a memorable day (iv) on 21 March 1948
(e) The seed of the Language (v) every year Movement (v) to the martyrs who laid

 

Column A Column B Column C
 (a) A really educated mother (i) is (i) naturally her children will be educated
(b) A child (ii) is educated (ii) therefore largely indebted to its educated mother
(c) An educated mother (iii) grows up always (iii) to build up an educated nation
(d) So, if the mother (iv) knows well how to bring up (iv) in contact with its mother
(e) An educated nation (v) plays a vital role (v) and nurture her children to make them worthy citizen of the country

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Environment pollution (i) to control (i) is polluted by garbage
(b)In our cities, air (ii) on both in urban and rural areas (ii) such an alarming problem
(c)Even the ground we walk (iii) in various ways (iii) in our country
(d)Water is also polluted (iv) is constantly being polluted (iv) in this modern age
(e)Measures must be taken (v) has become one of the greatest problems (v) by smoke of factories and vehicles

 

Column A Column B Column C
 (a) Man’s learning can’t (i) the elders is an act of (i) learning good manners
(b) Childhood is the (ii) sense of decency in |(ii) our dealing with others
(c) Smoking in presence of (iii) be complete without (iii) disapprobation of good manners
(d) What is assumed as good (iv) manners in a country may not (iv) acquisition of good manners
(e) We should have the (v) proper time for (v) be the same in another country

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) ICT means (i) ICT to take (i) multimedia classes
(b) in education sectors (ii) through tele-medicine which (ii) is run with the help of ICT
(c) In health science ICT is (iii) ICT works as a means (iii) and give good treatment
(d) Teachers can use (iv) Information and (iv) of class presentation
(e) Patients can get treatment (v) used to diagnose disease (v) Communication Technology

 

Column A Column B Column C
 (a) Rohingya crisis (i) these ill-fated people are migrating to Bangladesh as (a) killing of thousands of innocent Rohingya Muslims
(b) The crisis arises from (ii) instigates the crisis and (b) bedimmed the humanity
(c) The brutal Burmese Junta (iii) is a pressing problem (c) our Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina has been endowed with the title of “The Mother of Humanity”
(d) For saving lives (iv) Bangladesh has attracted the attention of the world community and (d) for Bangladesh in the recent times
(e) Giving shelter, providing foods and clothing (v) geo-political, racial and communal factors and (e) it is safe abode for these refugees

 

Column A Column B Column C
 (a) Language (i) with others (i) kinds of sounds
(b) We communicate (ii) is a medium of (ii) expressing our feelings
(c) Language (iii) sounds do not (iii) human feelings
(d) All the (iv) is meant for (iv) mean language
(e) Language (v) is made of particular (v) through language

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Mosquitoes find l (i) break out, if we fail to (i) by insecticides
(b) Dengue fever will (ii) a safe breeding ground (ii) neat and clean regularly
(c) Larva of mosquitoes (iii) kerosene or other kinds of (iii) on stagnant water
(d) People can use or spray (iv) their surroundings (iv) insect-killing powder to kill the larva
(e) They should keep (v) should be destroyed (v) take proper steps in this respect

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Dengue fever is (i) medical attention late (i) including bleeding, muscle pains, rash, etc.
(b) Dengue virus is spread (ii) a mosquito-borne tropical  disease (ii) limiting exposure to bite
(c) People infected with dengue (iii) reducing mosquito habitats (iii) of Aedes types
(d) Patients who seek (iv) suffer from sudden onset (iv) have less chances of of fever survival
(e) The only way to prevent it (v) by several species of  female mosquitoes (v) caused by dengue virus

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) A large number of people (i) people can engage (1) to this problem themselves
(b) It is not possible (ii) is a possible solution (ii) vocations
(c) Self-employment (iii) in one or other of these (iii) are unemployed
(d) It means that (iv) in Bangladesh (iv) employment to all
(e) People can train themselves (v) for the government to give (v) in economic activities

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) The moon   (i) has no light (i) the gift of the sun
(b) She (ii) the moon reflects (ii) a small fraction of brightness
c) To illuminate the earth (iii) has an appeal (iii) vast flood of light
(d) The sun (iv) highly depends on (iv) of her own
(e) The moon’s brightness (v) pours forth a (v) on poets and artists

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Many people living (i) of utilizing natural gas (i) whenever they use it for day-to-day purposes
(b) They waste water (ii) our resources (ii) and thus are wasting this resource
(c) Load-shedding hinders (iii) by leaving the taps (iii) will run out very soon running
(d) People are not careful (iv) in city areas are not careful (iv) of using natural resources
(e) If this wastage continues, (v) our industrial production (v) by making the machine

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Character is (i) character epitornizes (i) to bear a good character
(b) The man who bears (ii) the supreme place of (ii) treasure of a man
(c) A man of (iii) an invaluable (iii) acceptance in every society by dint of good character
(d) He occupies (iv) should try our best (iv) is respected by all
(e) So, all of us (v) a good character (v) all noble qualities like honesty

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Aedes mosquito (i) make the illiterate people carries the virus (i) pain in the whole body all over the world
(b) The considerate people should (ii) carries the virus (ii) all over the world
(c) The attacked (iii) is found (iii) of dengue fever
(d) Aedes mosquito (iv) fever spreads (iv) in Africa
(e) Now the dengue (v) person feels untold (v) conscious of dengue

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) A freedom fighter is  (i) their valuable lives (i) sons in that war
(b) But he fights for a noble  (ii) our heroic (ii) in every country
(c) Freedom fighters sacrifice (iii) cause that is to (iii) for the cause of motherland
(d) The people of Bangladesh (iv) honoured everywhere (iv) defend his country
(e) We have lost (v) fought a glorious war (v) against the Pak army in 1971

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Education means (i) conscious of our rights (i) the individual
(b) The purpose of education (ii) frees a man (ii) removing the darkness
(c) Education makes us (iii) aims at (iii) from restriction
(d) Education (iv) is to enlighten (iv) from any educational institution
(e) Education (v) the receiving of formal learning (v) and responsibilities

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) A man’s character (i) no fellowship (i) with unrighteousness
(b) The influence of a  (ii) can be best identified (it) by the company he keeps
(c) We should keep (iii) meet together (iii) from bad associations
(d) Righteousness can have (iv) ourselves away (iv) they destroy each other
(e) When fire and water (v) good company can (v) change the bad nature of a man

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) World temperature (i) is the most likely cause (i) of this global warming
(b) This increase in global warming (ii) fall victim (ii) to global warming
(c) Greenhouse effect (iii) may have destructive (iii) day by day
(d) Global warming (iv) is increasing rapidly (iv) effect on life
(e) Bangladesh may (v) is caused by increased amounts of carbon dioxide (v) around the world

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Conflict between teenagers and parents (i) are the kind of behaviours (i) that are the result of loneliness and communication gap
(b) One certain reason of (ii) self-centred and want conflict’; (ii) which they think are outdated
(c) Moody and sulky (iii) is very common and one behaviours   (iii) to think for themselves
(d) Consequently, adolescents (iv) thoughts of older are generation (iv) of the major problems of modern age
(e) They rebel against the (v) is the difficult behaviours ways and of the adolescents (v) which are common features of the teenagers

 

Column A Column B Column C
 (a) Dengue (i) has recently (i) responsible for spreading dengue virus
(b) It (ii) has broken (ii) a kind of viral fever
(c) The number of dengue patients (iii) is (iii) to keep our environment neat and clean to perish

the mosquitoes

(d) The mosquito named Aedes (iv) should come forward (iv) become a matter of great concern in our country
(e) All (v) is (v) the previous records

 

Column A Column B Column C
 (a) Good manner is (i) has been attached (i) in every sphere of life
(b) A man of good manners (ii) this invaluable virtue (ii) and is a great virtue
(c) In all religions, a great importance (iii) this great virtue (iii) is an ideal of humanity in all eras
(d) A person who possesses (iv) achieves success life (iv) from the early stage of
(e) So, all of us should cultivate (v) to good manners (v) the best quality of human being

 

Column A Column B Column C
 (a) People do not eat (i) the kinds of food that people eat (i) all over the world
(b) It (ii) eat a lot of fruits and vegetables (ii) depend on what they can grow or afford to buy

from other countries

(c) The eating habits of the people of a country (iii) varies (iii) which grow abundantly in these regions
(d) That is to say (iv) depend largely (iv) from place to place
(e) For instance, people in the tropical countries  (v) the same food (v) on its geographical position, climate and soil

 

Column A Column B Column C
 (a) Punctuality is a virtue (i) become (i) by all
(b) It helps us (ii) maintains punctuality never (ii) definitely succeed in life
(c) A person who (iii) is loved and admired (iii) accurate in timing
(d) He who is punctual (iv) punctual, we will (iv) make us successful in future
(e) If we become (v) which can (v) gets late in his work

 

Column A Column B Column C
 (a) 21st February is (i) to observe the day (i) with flowers
(b) Everyone goes (ii) declared the (ii) half-mast
(c) Shaheed Minar (iii) is kept (iii) International Mother Language Day
(d) The national flag (iv) at the foot of the (iv) at the Shaheed Minar
(e) We offer flower (v) is covered (v) Shaheed Minar

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) The culture of a society in Bangladesh are considered cultural differences
(b) To know the culture of a society can easily give study different patterns of it
(c) The modes of behaviour between different cultures are different from those in Britain
(d) Language, eating habits, etc. in one society a complete picture of life and living of that society
(e) The existing differences we need to differ from those in other societies

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) It is true (i) Prophet (sm), heaven (i) the sweetest word
(b) This sweet (ii) gives mother (ii) with our existence
(c) Our happiness (iii) and sorrows first touch (iii) our mother enormously
(d) Every religion (iv) name is entangled (iv) the highest place
(e) According to our (v) that ‘mother’ is (v) lies at the feet of mother

 

Column A Column B Column C
Addiction to mobile browsing are disobeying sometimes creating violation with parents
Even they by young kids make their valuable time on playing games on mobile phones
Thus, they has becoming addicted to this device
Using mobile phones invest them inattentive to their studies
The young people are reached its new height among young generation

 

Column A Column B Column C
(a) Hospitality (i) speaking to foreigners. (i) by asking personal questions
(b) People are very (ii) of the foreigners (ii) are interested in personal affairs
(c) They like (iii) is meant ( iii) towards foreigners
(d) The Bangladeshis (iv) has long been a part (iv) of our culture in Bangladesh
(e) No harm (v) even without being introduced (v) polite and friendly

 

Matching Sentences (Ques. No. 6)

  1. (a) Donation of blood is universally acknowledged to be a very noble deed. (b) In our society, some of us nourish a misconception about blood donation which conveys a negative message for the others. (c) As per medical science, every man in sound health can donate blood after every 3 months without any side effect. (d) We should have a crystal clear idea that if we donate blood, we invite no harm to us. (e) Sometimes, a bag of our blood is enough to save the life of a dying person.
  2. (a) There are many nice places in Bangladesh. (b) Cox’s Bazar is the most beautiful place among them. (c) Cox’s Bazar seabeach is very charming. (d) It is a remarkable place in our country in respect of the natural beauty. (e) Many people come to visit this sea beach every year.
  3. (a) Our Parliament House is one of the most spectacular buildings in the world. A (b) It has been designed by a famous American architect Louis I Kahn. (c) The building is surrounded by an artificial lake called Crescent Lake. (d) It was inaugurated in 1982. (e) The first parliamentary session was held in February in the same year.
  4. (a) Morality develops the conscience by which man can judge good or bad and right or wrong. (b) It helps a man guide himself in a proper way and cultivate all the virtues to become a complete man. (c) It is such a great natural power that it grows naturally in human behaviour which cannot ignore logic and reason. (d) But nowadays, moral erosion is increasing and we are losing the invaluable virtue of morality. (e) If we do not practise morality from our childhood, we shall fall in every aspect of life.
  5. (a) Your friends cannot help loving you if you love them. (b) It is love that makes us feel for others. (c) Love is divine which exists in everyone. (d) You cannot find others to love you unless you love them. (e) If you are not loved, it is a good evidence that you don’t love others.
  6. (a) Education means the receiving of formal learning from any educational institution. (b) The purpose of education is to enlighten the individual. (c) Education makes us conscious of our rights and responsibilities. (d) Education frees a man from restrictions. (e) Education aims at removing the darkness.
  7. (a) Sonargaon was the capital of Bengal during the Sultani period. (b) The importance of the city declined during the next Mughal period. (c) The place at that time had a reputation for the manufacture of Muslin Saree’. (d) Many businessmen selected Sonargaon as their dwelling place in the 19th century. (e) They built many beautiful buildings on both sides of the road.
  8. (a) The moon has an appeal on poets and artists. (b) She has no light of her own. (c) The sun pours forth a vast flood of light. (d) To illuminate the earth, the moon reflects a small fraction of brightness. (e) The moon’s light depends on the gift of the sun.
  9. (a) Substances called acids have a sharp taste known as acidity. (b) Ordinary rain water is slightly acidic. (c) But rain can be very acidic in severely polluted areas. (d) There is a link between acid rain and damage to human health, (e) Many world famous buildings are at risk due to severe acid rain.
  10. (a) Drug addiction means strong attraction for some particular sorts of drugs which are harmful to our body and mind. (b) It is now not only a national but also a global problem. (c) In fact, drugs are used basically for intoxicating and stimulating effects which tremendously tell upon our body and mind alike. (d) It is observed with great concern that especially the young boys are taking heroin, opium, phensidyl and so on. (e) These boys, being unemployed, cannot buy these drugs and are bound to commit crimes to arrange money.
  11. (a) The role of women in nation-building cannot be denied any more in the situation of the world. (b) It is not possible for any nation to reach its goal without allowing the womenfolk to play their active role. (c) There was a time when women were looked upon without any dignity and honour. (d) They were the only instruments to serve the family affairs. (e) But with the progress of civilization, the outlook and attitude of the world towards women has been changed.
  12. (a) The Nobel Prize, awarded every year for outstanding achievements, is the world’s most important and prestigious prize. (b) It is awarded in six fields like Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Medicine, Peace and Economics. (c) The prize winner is provided with a gold medal, a certificate and a large sum of money. (d) One prize is usually awarded in each individual field. (e) If there are more than one recipient for the prize in one field, the prize money is equally distributed amongst all the winners.
  13. (a) 21 February is a red-letter day in our national history and this day has been recognized as the International Mother Language Day. (b) It is our pride because no nation of the world has ever fought for its language except we, the Bengalis. (c) The recognition of the day as the International Mother Language Day by UNESCO has ushered in a new era in our national history. From the beginning of the 21st century, the whole world is observing 21st February as the International Mother Language Day. (e) This recognition is the best reward for the language martyrs who laid down their lives for establishing Bangla as’ state language.
  1. (a) In this world, there is no other word which is so sweet and endearing as the word ‘mother’. (b) We are related to our mother with such an affectionate and spiritual bond that she covers a large part of mental world all through our life on this earth. (c) In fact, there is no other person on this earth who loves us so dearly and affectionately as our mother. (d) She is a divine soul in the form of human being and so she represents heavenly love for us. (e) In every religion, mother has been given the highest place and so we must never break our mother’s heart with any sad or shocking action.
  2. (a) Smoking is undoubtedly a bad habit which is harmful not only physically but also financially. (b)Many people not realizing the bad effects of smoking become chain-smokers and consequently suffer greatly. (c) According to medical science, smoking causes various fatal diseases such as cancer, bronchitis, stroke, hypertension, etc. (d)Moreover, smoking harms not only the smoker but also all those who remain beside him. (e) So, we must give up this bad habit so that we can lead a healthy and happy life.
  3. (a) We should say ‘no’ to corruption because it is a serious social crime that hinders the development of a society. (b) Corruption is not only immoral but also harmful to our society as it slowly destroys a nation. (c) Now, it is high time we took stern action against corruption or we will be marked as a corrupt nation. (d) If we want to root out corruption, the most necessary thing which we require to do is ensuring rule of law. (e) But we are so self-centered because of our craving for luxurious and comfortable life that we do not think of the welfare of the country.
  4. (a) Introverts and extroverts are opposite in nature from different perspectives of their ways of life. (b) They are considered as two opposite types of personality of human beings. (c) People who are introvert are shy and they don’t like talking too much. (d) On the other hand, extroverts are usually outgoing, noisy and they are dominating in nature. (e) Introverts like to live alone but the extroverts don’t like to remain isolated.
  5. (a) Many diseases are rising at an alarming rate. (b) Experts believe that it is due to environment pollution. (c) Pollution appears to be greater in urban areas. (d) Today city people suffer from many more diseases. (e) Adulterated food is also responsible for affecting human beings.
  6. (a) We can’t ensure peace and prosperity without establishing human rights. (b) Rights should be preserved for both the privileged and the underprivileged classes of people, (c) Human rights are violated throughout the world because of violence. (d) Violation of human rights is a crime and society should get rid of it. (e) Human Rights Commission is an organization working for human rights.
  7. (a) Nowadays, students are getting busy with trifling matters and are seen indifferent to their studies. (b) As a result, they cannot cut a good figure in the examination which is expected by the parents. (c) Their parents who struggle for the better future of their children are worried about the matter. (d) The students are now seen passing their time on Facebook doing nothing beneficial. (e) Thus, they waste their valuable time unawarely and fall in problems in near future.
  1. (a) Bangladesh lies in the active earthquake zone. (b) During recent years, earthquakes recur frequently in Bangladesh (c) The recurrence of quakes in recent years have frightened everybody of our country. (d) Experts gave warning regarding earthquake. (e) Earthquake resistant building code should be followed strictly at the time of building any house.
  2. (a) Facebook is an Internet-based social network connecting people worldwide. (b) Nowadays, Facebook has become an important part of our daily life. (c) It contributes much to maintain social and friendly relationship among people living anywhere. (d) People are also using Facebook to facilitate the official works. (e) Everybody having Internet connection may gain access to Facebook, 23. (a) Humans, animals and plants are all equally important elements of our environment. (b) But humans are cruelly destroying plants and animals. (c) Various plants and animals have vanished from the earth in the last few decades. (d) Many wild animals and birds are faced with the threat of extinction. (e) If we don’t care for our wildlife, we cannot protect our environment from being spoilt.
  3. (a) Tolerance is not only an abstract virtue but also a considerable influence in the current affairs of life. (b) Man, being a social being, has to live in a spirit of harmony and co-operation with others in society. (c) In such a process, give and take is a necessary capacity for compromise. (d) We cannot persuade others unless we ourselves are at the same time ready to be persuaded by practising sweet and reasonableness. (e) It is thus seen that tolerance is a social virtue which is opposed to dogmatism and dictatorship.
  4. (a) We observe the 21st February as the Shaheed Day with due respect and solemnity. (b) On this important day, our national flag is kept at half mast on all public and private buildings. (c) We also offer flowers at the foot of the Shaheed Minar barefooted to pay respect to the martyrs. (d) The day was declared as the International Mother Language Day by UNESCO. (e) People from all walks of life spontaneously attend the morning procession singing ‘Amar Bhaier Rokte Rangano Ekushey February’.
  5. (a) A freedom fighter is honoured in all lands and in all times, because he fights for a noble cause which is the freedom of the motherland (b) The people of Bangladesh fought a glorious War of Independence against the Pakistani occupation forces in 1971. (c) They fought for long nine months and defeated the well-trained Pakistani forces. (d) The people who fought against the Pakistani army and the people who took part in the war are called the freedom fighters. (e) Many of the freedom fighters sacrificed their lives for the cause of the motherland.
  6. (a) The Olympic Games were named after the Town of Olympia in Greece. (b) The games were first held among the Greeks in Olympia long before the Christian era began. (c) A French man called Baron Pierre de Coubertin is the father of the Modern Olympic Games. (d) Nowadays, the Olympic Games take place every four years and are participated by almost all the nations of the world. (e) In fact, the Olympic Games give rise to a world festival and millions of people all over the world enjoy them on television.
  1. (a) A book fair is an exhibition where books of different writers are displayed and sold. (b) People in large numbers pay a visit to The Ekushey Boi Mela’ usually held in the Bangla Academy premises to buy some newly published books. (c) There are the books of literature, history, culture, science, sports and religion. (d) It has become a great attraction for the educated and cultured people. (e) It also instils a love of books and develops the habit of reading books.
  2. (a) An ideal student is he who studies regularly, obeys his teachers, parents and other superiors, (b) He never mixes with bad boys and wastes his valuable time in idleness. (c) He sits to read when it is time to read and plays when it is time to play. (d) He always listens to his teachers and prepares his lessons regularly in order to make a good result in the exams. (e) As he is studious, industrious, truthful and obedient to his superiors, everyone loves him.
  3. (a) Satellite television has added new dimension to television. (b) Numerous TV channels telecast various types of programmes. (c) But sometimes it has been branded as a cultural assault to the developing nations. (d) Sometimes our younger people are being affected by satellite television. (e) The exhibition of violence on TV makes the children more aggressive.
  4. (a) Democracy means the rule of general people. (b) Democracy encourages freedom of speech. (c) In democracy, people have right to elect their representatives. (d) Free and fair election is the precondition of democracy. (e) Bangladesh is a democratic country.
  5. (a) Democracy is a system of government. (b) It allows freedom of speech, religion and political opinions. (c) It means fair and equal treatment for citizens. (d) People elect their representatives direct in a democratic country. (e) Free and fair election is the precondition of democracy.
  6. (a) Truthfulness is the greatest of all human virtues. (b) We must cultivate the habit of speaking the truth. (c) Otherwise, we will never win the respect of others. (d) A lie never lies hidden for long. (e) Today or tomorrow it comes to light.
  7. (a) Globalization is a process of expanding trade and commerce all over the world by creating a borderless market. (b) With the development of high-tech communication media and transportation facilities, the world has come closer. (c) We can now learn instantly what is happening in the farthest corner of the world and travel to any country in the shortest possible time. (d) The people of the world can even share their joys and sorrows like next-door neighbours. (e) If one country is in distress; others can immediately come to its assistance.
  8. (a) Although smoking is injurious to health, many people are addicted to it. (b) People who smoke once become addicted to it and can’t give up this habit easily. (c) As they become chain smokers, they find it difficult to give it up. (d) They smoke because they think they are benefited by it. (e) If they want to lead a healthy life, they have to give up this bad habit anyhow.
  9. (a) Our total environment influences our life and our way of living. (b) The main elements of the environment are men, animals, plants, soil, air and water. (c) There are relationships among these elements of the environment. (d) When these relationships are disturbed, life becomes difficult or impossible. (e) So, it is our duty to keep the environment balanced and favourable.
  10. (a) Email has brought about a revolution in modern communication, (b) Massage can be transmitted from one country to another within seconds. (c) It is far cheaper than telephone calls. (d) Trade and commerce has become greatly dependent on this speedy mode of communication. (e) It has however, not reached everyone especially in developing countries like ours.
  11. (a) The Bangabandhu Satellite-1 is the first Bangladeshi geostationary and communication satellite. (b) It was manufactured by Thales Alenia Space and was launched on 11 May 2018 by Space X. (c) The satellite covers the whole South Asia including the Bay of Bengal. (d) Now, remote areas of the country can be provided with Internet service and disaster-time aid easily. (e) Satellite TV channels can use the cheap bandwidth and frequency and thus can save a huge amount of foreign currency.
  12. (a) We achieved our national flag at the cost of a sea of blood in 1971. (b) Its red round part symbolizes the rising of the sun of independence. (c) As the sun is the source of life on the earth, it also signifies our glorious existence. (d) Our national flag is the source of our spirit, hopes and aspirations. (e) So, we must defend our independence at any cost and save the existence and dignity of our national flag.
  13. (a) Humans can neither change the sun’s radiation nor the earth’s orbit around the sun. (b) But they can control the increase in the amount of greenhouse gases. (c) The carbon dioxide concentration had been raised alarmingly during the last hundred years. (d) The main cause of the increase in carbon dioxide level in the atmosphere lies in the burning of fossil fuels. (e) We humans are responsible for the alarming rise of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. 41. (a) 21 February is a memorable day in our national history. (b) We observe the day every year as International Mother Language Day. (c) On this day we pay tribute to the martyrs who laid down their lives to establish Bangla as a state language. (d) The struggle to achieve our language rights is known as the Language Movement. (e) The seed of the Language Movement was sown on 21 March 1948.
  1. (a) Hospitality has long been a part of our culture in Bangladesh. (b) People are very polite and friendly towards foreigners. (c) They like speaking to foreigners even without being introduced. (d) The Bangladeshis are interested in personal affairs of the foreigners. (e) No harm is meant by asking personal questions.
  2. (a) Drug damages brain. (b) When there is no hope left for the young people, they get addicted to drug. (c) The frequent taking of drugs leads a man to death. (d) The effect of drug is very poisonous. (e) Drug problem is acute in Bangladesh.
  3. (a) Human beings have responsibility for preventing the environment pollution. (b) We should keep the environment clean and danger-free. (c) Many factors are responsible for ecological imbalance. (d) Natural disasters are caused by ecological imbalance. (e) The changes in the world climate are the results of ecological imbalance.
  4. (a) When someone comes to Sri Lanka, they may often hear the word Ayubowan. (b) This word means may you have the gift of long life. (c) It is with this traditional greeting that everyone is welcomed to Sri Lanka, (d) Sri Lanka has many nicknames which are Serendip, Ceylon, Teardrop of India, Pearl of the Indian Ocean, etc.
  5. (e) These names reveal the richness and beauty of this island nation. (a) Women in rural Bangladesh have very few opportunities of work outside the home. (b) They are compelled to spend their whole life in doing household chores. (c) Recently, the ILO has launched a project for employment of rural women. (d) The project aims at training rural women in various economic activities. (e) Very poor women have started reaping the benefits of laudable project.
  6. (a) We must acknowledge our debt to the parents and then to nature. (b) The first lesson we learned was from our parents. (c) They taught us how to eat, how to talk and how to live. (d) But when we came out of our house, we discovered the endless mystery of nature. (e) We wondered how graceful the Creator is to arrange everything in order.
  7. (a) Our world is becoming smaller day by day with the blessings of science. (b) Now a man from one part of the world can communicate with a person of another part in a. second through the Internet. (c) Internet communication is the latest invention in the communication system. (d) A man can make friendship with anybody in any place or even a person choose life partner through Internet. (e) A student sitting in the reading room can use the London Library and collect necessary information.
  1. (a) Science has made our life different from what it was in the past. (b) In the past, after school hours, we would play in the field in the afternoon. (c) But children at present keep indoors and spend time on computer or TV. (d) They do not enjoy the sunset or even the beauty of a moonlit night. (e) This is why, their outlook is also different from ours.
  2. (a) A really educated mother plays a vital role to build up an educated nation. (b) A child grows up always in contact with its mother. (c) An educated mother knows well how to bring up and nurture her children to make them worthy citizen of the country. (d) So, if the mother is educated naturally her children will be educated. (e) An educated nation is therefore largely indebted to its educated mother.
  3. (a) Environment pollution has become one of the greatest problems in this modern age. (b) In our cities, air is constantly being polluted by smoke of factories and vehicles. (c) Even the ground we walk on both in urban and rural areas is polluted by garbage. (d) Water is also polluted in various ways in our country. (e) Measures must be taken to control such an alarming problem.
  4. (a) Man’s learning can’t be complete without acquisition of good manners. (b) Childhood is the proper time for learning good manners. (c) Smoking in presence of the elders is an act of disapprobation of good manners. (d) What is assumed as good manners in a country may not be the same in another country. (e) We should have the sense of decency in our dealing with others.
  5. (a) ICT means Information and Communication Technology. (b) In education sectors ICT works as a means of class presentation. (c) In health science ICT is used to diagnose disease and give good treatment. (d) Teachers can use ICT to take multimedia classes. (e) Patients can get treatment through tele-medicine which is run with the help of ICT.
  6. (a) Rohingya crisis is a pressing problem for Bangladesh in the recent times. (b) The crisis arises from geo-political, racial and communal factors and killing of thousands of innocent Rohingya Muslims. (c) The brutal Burmese Junta instigates the crisis and bedimmed the humanity. (d) For saving lives these ill-fated people are migrating to Bangladesh as it is safe abode for these refugees. (e) Giving shelter, providing foods and clothing Bangladesh has attracted the attention of the world community and our Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina has been endowed with the title of “The Mother of Humanity”. 55. (a) Language is a medium of expressing our feelings. (b) We communicate with others through language. (c) Language is meant for human feelings. (d) All the sounds do not mean language. Language is made of particular kinds of sounds. (e) Mosquitoes find a safe breeding ground on stagnant water.
  7. (a) Dengue fever will break out, if we fail to take proper steps in this respect. (c) Larva of mosquitoes should be destroyed by insecticides. (d) People can use or spray kerosene or other kinds of insect-killing powder to kill the larva, (e) They should keep their surroundings neat and clean regularly.
  8. (a) Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne tropical disease caused by dengue virus. (b) Dengue virus is spread by several species of female mosquitoes of Aedes types. (c) People infected with dengue suffer from sudden onset of fever including bleeding, muscle pains, rash, etc. (d) Patients who seek medical attention late have less chances of survivals. (e) The only way to prevent it is reducing mosquito habitats and limiting exposure to bite.
  9. (a) A large number of people in Bangladesh are unemployed. (b) It is not possible for the government to give employment to all. (c) Self-employment is a possible solution to this problem. (d) It means that people can engage themselves in economic activities. (e) People can train themselves in one or other of these vocations.
  10. (a) The moon has no light of her own. (b) She has an appeal on poets and artists. (c) To illuminate the earth, the moon reflects a small fraction of brightness. (d) The sun pours forth a vast flood of light. (e) The moon’s brightness highly depends on the gift of the sun.
  11. (a) Many people living in city areas are not careful of using natural resources. (b) They waste water by leaving the taps running and thus are wasting this resource. (c) Load-shedding hinders our industrial production by making the machine stop. (d) People are not careful of utilizing natural gas whenever they use it for day-to-day purposes. (e) If this wastage continues, our resources will run out very soon.
  12. (a) Character is an invaluable treasure of a man. (b) The man who bears a good character is respected by all. (c) A man of character epitomizes all noble qualities like honesty. (d) He occupies the supreme place of acceptance in every society by dint of good character. (e) So, all of us should try our best to bear a good character.
  13. (a) Aedes mosquito is found in Africa. (b) The considerate people should make the illiterate people conscious of dengue. (c) The attacked person feels untold pain in the whole body. (d) Aedes mosquito carries the virus of dengue fever. (e) Now the dengue fever spreads all over the world.
  14. (a) A freedom fighter is honoured everywhere in every country. (b) But he fights for a noble cause that is to defend his country. (c) Freedom fighters sacrifice their valuable lives for the cause of motherland. (d) The people of Bangladesh fought a glorious war against the Pak army in 1971. (e) We have lost our heroic sons in that war.
  15. (a) Education means the receiving of formal learning from any educational institution. (b) The purpose of education is to enlighten the individual. (c) Education aims at removing the darkness. (d) Education frees a man from restriction. (e) Education makes us conscious of our rights and responsibilities.
  16. (a) A man’s character can be best identified with unrighteousness. (b) The influence of a good company can change the bad nature of a man. (c) We should keep ourselves away from bad associations. (d) Righteousness can have no fellowship by the company he keeps. (e) When fire and water meet together they destroy each other.
  17. (a) World temperature is increasing rapidly day by day. (b) This increase in global warming is caused by increased amounts of carbon dioxide around the world. (c) Greenhouse effect is the most likely cause of this global warming. (d) Global warming may have destructive effect on life. (e) Bangladesh may fall victim to global warming.
  18. (a) Conflict between teenagers and parents is very common and one of the major problems of modern age. (b) One certain reason of conflict is the difficult behaviours of the adolescents that are the result of loneliness and communication gap. (c) Moody and sulky behaviours are the kind of behaviours which are common features of the teenagers. (d) Consequently, adolescents are self-centred and want to think for themselves. (e) They rebel against the ways and thoughts of older generation which they think are outdated.
  19. (a) Dengue is a kind of viral fever. (b) It has recently become a matter of great concern in our country. (c) The number of dengue patients has broken the previous records. (d) The mosquito named Aedes is responsible for spreading dengue virus. (e) All should come forward to keep our environment neat and clean to perish the mosquitoes.
  20. (a) Good manner is the best quality of human being and is a great virtue. (b) A man of good manners achieves success in every sphere of life. (c) In all religions, a great importance has been attached to good manners. (d) A person who possesses. this invaluable virtue is an ideal of humanity in all eras. (e) So, all of us should cultivate this great virtue from the early stage of life.
  21. (a) People do not eat the same food all over the world. (b) It varies from place to place. (c) The eating habits of the people of a country depend largely on its geographical position, climate and soil. (d) That is to say the kinds of food that people eat depend on what they can grow or afford to buy from other countries. (e) For instance, people in the tropical countries eat a lot of fruits and vegetables which grow abundantly in these regions.
  22. (a) Punctuality is a virtue which can make us successful in future. (b) It helps us become accurate in timing. (c) A person who maintains punctuality never gets late in his work. (d) He who is punctual is loved and admired by all. (e) If we become punctual, we will definitely succeed in life.
  23. (a) 21st February is declared the International Mother Language Day. (b) Everyone goes to observe the day at the Shaheed Minar. Shaheed Minar is covered with flowers. (c) The national flag is kept half-mast. (d)We offer flower at the foot of the Shaheed Minar.
  24. (a) The culture of a society can easily give a complete picture of life and living of that society. (b) To know the culture of a society, we need to study different patterns of it. (c) The modes of behaviour in one society differ from those in other societies. (d) Language, eating habits, etc, in Bangladesh are different from those in Britain. (e) The existing differences between different cultures are considered cultural differences.
  25. (a) It is true that ‘mother’ is the sweetest word. (b) This sweet name is entangled with our existence. (c) Our happiness and sorrows first touch our mother enormously. (d) Every religion gives mother the highest place. (e) According to our Prophet (sm); heaven lies at the feet of mother.
  26. (a) Addiction to mobile browsing has reached its new height among young generation. (b) Using mobile phones by young kids make them inattentive to their studies. (c) The young people invest their valuable time on playing games on mobile phones. (d) Even they are disobeying sometimes creating violation with parents. (e) Thus, they are becoming addicted to this device.

 

 

 

 

 

Class 9-10, First Paper, Model Questipns, Unseen Passage

Unseen passage

 

4. Read the passage on Altaf Mahmud. Complete the following table with information from the passage.

Altaf Mahmud was a musician, cultural activist, and martyred freedom fighter of the Bangladesh Liberation War. He was born on the 23 December, 1933. He was also a language activist of the Language Movement and composer of ‘Amar Bhaier Rokte Rangano’, the famous song written by Abdul Gaffar Chowdhury a famous journalist. In 1950, he sang gonoshongit in many places to inspire the activists of Language Movement. Along with his singing Mahmud continued to support the movement. He tuned the song ‘Amar Bhaier Rokte Rangano’ in 1969, in Zahir Raihan’s film “Jibon Theke Neya’. Altaf Mahmud took part in the Bangladesh Liberation War in 1971. He created a secret camp inside his house for the freedom fighters. But as the secret revealed, Pakistan Army caught him on August 30, 1971. He was tortured by them. A lot of other guerrilla war fighters like Shafi Imam Rumi were also captured by the Pak Army on that day. Along with most of them, he was lost ever since. His patriotic songs which were then broadcast at the “Swadhin Bangla Betar Kendra” also inspired the war fighters at that time. In 1977, Altaf Mahmud was awarded the Ekushey Padak for his valuable contribution to Bengali culture and the War of Liberation.

4. Complete the table below with information from the above passage.

Altaf Mahmud
Role Musician, cultural activist and freedom fighter
Life time From 1933 to (i) –
Who/What Activities Type of work/name Time
Altaf Mahmud sang (ii) — 1950’s
(iii) — was tuned song 1969
Altaf Mahmud (iv) —   1971
Bangladesh Government awarded him Ekushey Padak (v) —

5. Write a summary of the above passage in your own words.

 

Read the passage on Abul Kasem Fazlul Huq and answer questions no. 4 and 5.

Abul Kasem Fazlul Huq was born in 1873 at Saturia in Barishal. He received his primary education in a village Maktab. Then he entered Barishal Zilla School. He passed the Entrance Examination standing first in the Dhaka Division. After that, he went to Kolkata for higher education. At the age of twenty-one, he passed the BSc. Exam obtaining Honours in Chemistry, Physics and Math from the Presidency College, Kolkata. He took his MSc degree in Math in 1895. The next year, he was appointed as an examiner of MA in Math in Kolkata University. Then he passed BL Examination. Then he enrolled himself in the Kolkata High Court. He worked with Nawab Sir Salimullah. He played an important role in founding the All Indian Muslim League in 1906. Then he became Deputy Magistrate. But he resigned and again joined Kolkata High Court. In 1913, he became an elected member of BLC. Three years after, he attend the special joint| session of the Congress and the Muslim League in Lucknow. In 1918, he became the General Secretary of the Indian National Congress and the President of the All Indian Muslim League.

4. Complete the table below with information from the above passage.

Abul Kasem Fazlul Huq
His main contributions Founded the All Indian Muslim League and became the (i) — of it
His Honours subjects Chemistry, Physics and Maths
Who Event Date/Year Subjects Place Speciality
Abul Kasem Fazlul Huq was born 1873   (ii)  
He (iii) — 1894 Chemistry, Physics and Maths Presidency College, Kolkata obtaining

Honours

He took his MSc degree (iv) Maths    
He (v) — 1896 Maths Kolkata University of MA

5. Write a summary of the above passage in your own words.

 

Read the passage on Alessandro Volta and complete the following table with the information given in the passage.

Alessandro Volta was a famous Italian physicist. He is well-known for the invention of the first battery in 1800. He was born in Como, Italy on February 18, 1745. In 1774, he became a professor of Physics at the Royal School in Como. Volta studied the Chemistry of gases from 1776-1778. In November 1777, he discovered methane in a lake. In 1779, he became a professor of experimental Physics at the University of Pavia. In 1794, Volta married an aristocratic lady. In honour of his work, he was made a count by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1801. In 1782, he travelled to France and Germany. In 1815, the Emperor of Austria made him the director of Philosophical Faculty of Padua. In 1819, he retired and settled in his native town where he died in March 1827.

About Alessandro Volta
Aims Introducing his invention to the readers
Lifespan Born in 1745 and died in 1827 after (i) ……….. years of his retirement.
Who/What Event Year/Time Place/Country Workfield
Alessandro Volta professor 1774 (ii) — Physics
He discovered (iii) — methane in a lake  
He joined as a professor 1779 (iv) — experimental Physics
(v) — made Alessandro Volta director 1815 Padua Philosophical Faculty

5. Write a summary of the above passage in your own words.,

 

Read the following text carefully and answer the questions no. 4 and 5.

Abul Fazal, educationist and writer, was born on 1 July 1903 in the village of Keochia in Satkania Chattogram district. His father, Moulavi Fazlur Rahman, was an Imam of Chattogram Jame Masjid. He completed his BA from Dhaka University in 1928. In 1930, he did his BT from training College, Dhaka. He completed his Master’s degree in Bangla Language and literature from Kolkata University in 1940. He worked as a teacher of Bangla in Krishnanagar and Chattogram College. In 1973, he was made Vice Chancellor of Chattogram University. In 1975 he joined the Advisory Council of the Government of Bangladesh, but resigned on 23 June 1977. He wrote novels, short stories, plays, memories of travels, etc. His contribution to Bangla literature earned him the Bangla Academy Award (1962), the President’s Award (1963) the Adamjee Literary Award (1966), etc. He died on 4 May 1983 in Chattogram.

4. Complete the following table with the information from the passage.

Biography of Abul Fazal
Known as educationist and writer
Lifespan from 1 July 1903 to (i) —
Who What Event/Activity Time Place Specialty
Abul Fazal education (ii) — in 1940 Kolkata University (iii) —
Abul Fazal professional life Vice Chancellor in 1973 (iv) —  
Abul Fazal   joined (v) — Advisory Council of the  Govt

5. Write a summary of the above passage in your own words.

 

Read the passage on rescue of Thai footballer and answer questions No. 4 and 5.

One 23 June 2018, twelve Thai young footballers along with their coach missed in a cave network in Chiang Rai province in Thailand. From the next day national and international community became worried for them. Their age were between 11 to 16 and their coach was 25. The football team had been on an exploration to the cave network following a game. The group became stranded after monsoon rain caused the cave system to flood. The cave system named Tham Luang is 10 kilometres long. It is a snaking route which has a number of chambers already submerged in water. It took 6 hours to get where footballers were and five hours to come back to cave entrance. Thai rescuers began their expedition to find out them after the missing. International rescue team also joined them. On July 3 the footballers were discovered alive by a British diver. Spending nine days in darkness they were suffering from hunger. A Thai rescuer died while he was supplying them food and other necessities. Getting weather forecast the rescue team planned to rescue them immediately. Navy divers had to lead the boys along the underway path from the cave. On July 8, four boys were rescued. Finally all 13 were rescued in next three days.

4. Complete the table below with information from the above passage:

Missing of young Thai Footballers
Aim Rescue the team alive
Who Activities When Where/Place
12 Thai Footballers missed June 23, 2018 (i) —
International community (ii) — June 24, 2018 Tham Luang Cave, Chiang Rai. Thailand.
A British diver (iii) — July 3, 2018 Tham Luang Cave, Chiang Rai. Thailand.
A Thai Rescuer died (iv) — Tham Luang Cave, Thailand
(v) — were rescued next three days Chiang Rai, Thailand

5. Write a summary of the above passage in your own words.

 

Read the following passage and answer the questions no. 4 and 5.

Rabindranath Tagore was one of the most leading poets in the history of world literature. He was at the same time a poet, a novelist, a dramatist, a philosopher and a musician. He was born in the renowned Tagore family in March, 1861. After the completion of his house education, he was sent to school. But he did not like institutional education. So arrangements were made at house for his proper education. In his thirteenth year, Rabindranath along with his father went to visit Himalayas. At the age of seventeen he was sent to London to study law. But he studied literature with professor Henry Morley only for a few months and then returned home. Only at the age of eight he started composing poems. He wrote his poetic novel Banaphul at the age of fifteen. When he was sixteen, his poems and essays were being published in journals. After returning from England, he began to write tirelessly in all branches of literature. In 1911 he translated his poems of “The Gitanjali” into English which brought him the highest honour in the form of the Nobel Prize in 1913. One year after his awarding of the Novel Prize, he was made a knight by the British Government which he rejected as a protest against the atrocities of British Government at Jalianwalabagh. The University of Oxford honoured him with D.Litt., in 1940. Earlier in 1921, he laid the foundation of Viswa Bharati. At the age of eighty, Rabindranath Tagore breathed his last.

4. Complete the table below with information from the above passage.

Biography of Rabindranath Tagore
Known as a poet, a novelist, a dramatist, a philosopher and a musician
Life span From 1861 to (i) —
Who What Event/Activity Time/When Place/Where Subject/Specialty
Rabindranath tour went to visit (ii) — Himalayas accompanied by his father
Rabindranath education was sent to study (iii) —   (iv) —
  (v) — brought him the highest 1913 honour in the form of the Nobel Prize 1913    

5. Write a summary of the above passage in your own words.

 

Read the passage on SAARC and answer questions no. 4 and 5.

SAARC is a regional organization for mutual cooperation, friendship and development. The full form of SAARC is “South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation”. At the initial stage, there were only seven developing nations to form the organization. Later, Afghanistan was included as one of its member countries. SAARC started its journey through holding its first conference in Dhaka on 8 December 1985. At present, the member countries of this organization are Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Afghanistan. The secretariat of this organization is situated in the capital of Nepal. Its head is called Secretary General. There is a deep relationship between Bangladesh and SAARC. It was Bangladesh that took the first initiative to form SAARC. As the initiator of SAARC, Bangladesh has been playing a significant and strong role in its different activities. As one of the member countries it has also been making every effort to expand the trade between the member countries and to solve the regional conflicts and existing crisis between the neighbouring countries.

4. Complete the table below with information from the above passage.

Aim Mutual cooperation
Time Officially started in (i) —
Who/ What Event/ Activity When Where
(ii) — initiator of SAARC 1985  
Secretariat located   (iii) —
(iv) — included as the last member country    
First conference (v) —   Dhaka

5. Write a summary of the above passage in your own words.

 

Read the following passage and answer the questions no. 4 and 5:

Milton was a great poet after Shakespeare. His father early decided that Milton was to have a literary career. At the age of 7, in 1615 he got himself admitted in Star Palace School. But Milton could not pay attention to his studies in this school. After a couple of years, he left the school and studied at St. Paul’s School till 1624. In the succeeding year, John Milton entered Christ College in Cambridge. He took his M.A degree at the age of 24 and went to his father’s house in the village of Horton. Milton’s father, however, had faith in his son and allowed him to continue his studies at Horton from 1632 to 1638. During his time, he made himself master of everything worth knowing in the literature of Rome, Greece, Italy, France, Spain and the Bible. In 1643, Milton met Mary Powel in an occasion and married her. But this great poet became blind in 1652. The idea behind his famous work ‘Paradise Lost’ developed after his blindness. ‘Paradise Lost’ saw the light of the day in the year 1665. Nine years after its publications, this great artist in Literature died.

4. Complete the table below with the information from the passage.

John Milton
Name of events Place Year/Time What/Contribution
Born   (i) —  
Studied from 1617-1624 (ii) —    
(iii)   at 24  
Famous work     (iv) —
Milton passed away   (v) —  

5. Write a summary of the above passage in your own words.

 

Read the following text carefully and answer the questions no. 4 and 5.

The great men were born in different places of this world but their activities make them familiar and closer to us. Dr. Muhammad Shahidullah is one of those who contributed a lot towards Bangla language and merature he was the greatest scholar of Bengal. This great scholar was born on July, 1885 at 24 Pargonas in West Bengal, India. He passed his entrance examination in 1904 and obtained his B.A. degree six years later. It took him two years to complete his M.A. and another two years for his Bachelor of Law Degree. He later joined the University of Dhaka in 1921 as a Professor of Sanskrit and Bengali. He was awarded the Doctorate Degree from Sorborne University, Paris in 1928. “Bangla Shahitter Katha,” the first well-arranged history of Bengali literature was composed by him that was published in 1953. This great scholar remained busy with his work till he became seriously ill in 1967 and was confined to bed for about two and a half years. Dr. Shahidullah breathed his last on 13th July, 1969 in Dhaka. We remember him with great respect and gratitude.

4. Complete the table below with information from the above passage.

(Dr. Muhammad Shahidullah)
Speciality Great contribution to Bengali literature
Time Dr. Muhammad Shahidullah was born in (i) –
Who/What Event/Activity When Where
(ii) — passed entrance examination in 1904  
Dr.Muhammad Shahidullah joined as Professor in 1921 (iii) —
He (iv) — in 1928 Sorborne University, Paris
“Bangla Shahitter Katha” was published (v) —  

5. Write a summary of the above passage in your own words.

 

Read the passage on Gustave Eiffel and his Tower and answer questions No. 4 and 5:

The Eiffel Tower was named after Gustave Eiffel, a Frenchman who designed the tower. He was born in a prosperous family in 1832. He took his graduation from the Central School of Engineering in Paris and went to work for a railway construction company. His mother thought that he would not go far. “Be patient, mum. I’ve got some ideas. You’ll see,” Gustave assured his mother. For years, Gustave made plan after plan of dams, factories, stations and structures of great sized buildings. All over Europe engineers copied them. In the middle of 1880s, a group of French industrialists persuaded the government to organize a World Fair in Paris. Gustave proposed a 989 feet tower of iron as a symbol of the fair. The construction of the tower began in January 1887. Forty engineers and designers worked under Gustave’s direction for two years. The tower was finally completed in March 1889. It is the highest structure of iron made by man. No such structure had ever been constructed before. It is regarded as one of the wonders of the world.

4. Complete the table below with the information from the above passage:

Gustave Eiffel
Speciality Designer of the highest structure of iron made by man.
Time The construction of the tower began in (i) —
Who/ What Event/ Activity When Where
Gustave (ii) — in 1832 in a prosperous family
Gustave started working (iii) — for a railway construction company
(iv) — persuaded government to organise a fair in 1880s (v) —

5. Write a summary of the above passage in your own words.

 

Read the passage on Altaf Mahmud. Complete the following table with information from the passage.

Altaf Mahmud was a musician, cultural activist and martyred freedom fighter of the Bangladesh Liberation War. He was and on the 23rd December 1933. He was also a language activist of the Language Movement and composer of Amar Bhaier Rokte Rangano- the famous song written to commemorate the event. During the 1950s, he sang gonoshongit in many places to support the movement. He tuned the song ‘Amar Bhaier Rokte Rangano’ in 1969, in Zahir Raihan’s film Jibon Theke Neya. Altaf Mahmud took part in the Liberation War in 1971. He created a secret camp inside his house for the freedom fighters. But as the secret was revealed, Pakistan army caught him on August 30, 1971. He was tortured by them. A lot of other guerrilla war fighters were also captured by the Pak army on that day. Along with most of them, he was lost ever since. His patriotic songs which were then broadcast at the Swadhin Bangla Betar Kendra also inspired the war fighters at that time. In 1977, Altaf Mahmud was awarded the Ekushey Padak posthumously for his valuable contribution to Bengali culture and the War of Liberation.

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

Biography of Altaf Mahmud
Known as Musician, cultural activist and martyred freedom fighter
Lifespan From 23rd December 1933 to (i) —
Who What Event/Activity Time/ When Place/Where Purpose
Altaf Mahmud singer (ii) — during the 1950s in many places to inspire the activists of the Language Movement
Altaf Mahmud composer tuned the song ‘Amar Bhaier Rokte Rangano’ (iii) — in Zahir Raihan’s film Jibon Theke Neya  
Altaf Mahmud freedom fighter (iv) — in 1971 (v) — to free the country

5. Summarize the above passage in no more than 90 words.

 

Read the passage. Complete the following table with information from the passage.

Mount Everest is the highest mountain peak in the world. It is over 29,000 feet above the sea level. It was named after George Everest, an Englishman who first surveyed the Himalayas in 1841. Many expeditions had been led to conquer Mount Everest. Some of them were abandoned. Many climbers who took part in them lost their lives. Sir Edmund Hillary from New Zealand and his companion Tenzing Norgay from Nepal led an expedition in 1953. The expedition was set out on March 10. As the climbers were going up they set up camps at different places. They left some of their men in those camps. The highest camp was set up at 27,000 feet. ‘Only Hillary and Tenzing reached the height on March 25. But the top was 2000 feet away. They went up and up. After two months of difficult and dangerous climbing, they succeeded in reaching the top on May 10. They felt excited when they stood there. They have gone down in history as the conquerors of the highest mountain in the world. They were oven hearty welcome in 1954. Hillary went to Britain with Tenzing in 1955. They were given tribute in 1956. In 1956, they were recorded in the Guinness Book. In 1958, both of them were given honour of world hero.

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

The victory over Mount Everest details
Purpose To conquer the top of Mount Everest.
Starting The expedition started by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay in (i) —
Who/What Event Year/When Where/country Mission/ How
George Everest (ii) — 1841 the Himalayas  
Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay (iii) — 1953   (iv) —
They Have gone down in history   In the world (v) —

5. Summarize the above passage in no more than 90 words.

 

Read the passage. Complete the following table with information from the passage.

Neil A. Armstrong commanded the Gemini 8 mission and became the first human to walk on the moon as commander of Apollo 11. He was born in Wapakoneta, Ohio, on August 5, 1930. He received a Bachelor of Science degree from Purdue University and a Master of Science degree from the University of Southern California. Armstrong joined the Navy and flew as a naval aviator from 1949 to 1952. In 1955 he joined the National Advisory Committee for Flight Propulsion Laboratory and later was transferred to the High Speed Flight Station at Edwards Air Force Base, California, as a civilian pilot for NACA and NASA. Among the aircrafts he tested the X-15 rocket plane. On July 16, 1969, Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins departed for the moon. Four days later, Armstrong and Aldrin landed their Lunar Module in the moon’s Sea of Tranquility. Armstrong, and then Aldrin, stepped onto the surface and became the first humans to leave their footprints in the lunar dust. They explored the surface and gathered moon rocks for over two hours. The next day they fired off the surface and rejoined Collins in the orbiting mother ship. He was died August 25, 2012.

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

Biography of Neil A. Armstrong
Known as The first human who stepped on the surface of the moon
Lifespan (i) — Years
Date Description
1949 (ii) —
(iii) — joined NASA as a civilian pilot
20 July 1969 (iv) —
(v) — rejoined with Collins

5. Summarize the above passage in no more than 90 words.

 

Read the passage. Complete the following table with information from the passage.

Your hair and every cell in your body contain your unique DNA. It can tell you a lot about your family, health, and personality. DNA was discovered by a German scientist, Fredrick Miescher in 1869. But nobody realized its importance then. Other scientists thought that it was too simple to contain the map of how we are made. In 1953, a group of British scientists of Cambridge University finally discovered the structure of DNA and how it worked. They were given the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1962. Gradually, scientists learned to ‘read more and more of the information in DNA. In 1986, for the first time DNA test was used by the police. Some DNA are usually left by a criminal at the place where the crime was committed. This can be matched with DNA from a suspect. The test shows if the suspect is guilty.

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

Discovery of DNA
Main focus DNA carries all biological information of human body and moreover it is used to detect (i) —
Who/What Event Year Identity/Reason Where/When Specialty
Fredrich Miescher (ii) — 1869 A German scientist

 

  But nobody realized its

importance

(iii) — Finally discovered the structure of DNA 1953

 

  Cambridge University

 

 
They were given the Nobel Prize (iv) — for medicine

 

  Scientists learned to read more and more about DNA
The police Used DNA 1986   (v) — the suspect is guilty or not

5. Summarize the above passage in no more than 90 words.

 

Read the passage. Complete the following table with information from the passage.

Dhaka is a very ancient and historical city. It came to limelight when Islam Khan made Dhaka the seat of provincial government in 1612. Present old Dhaka was once the heart of Dhaka city. It has been visited by many foreigners. Johnson Road, Minto Road, Fuller Road, North Brook Hall Road. Waizghat, etc. bear the memories of those foreigners. Dr James Waiz was the civil surgeon of Dhaka. He published a book named ‘Note on the Races, Castes and Trades of Eastern’ in 1883. The foundation of Carzon Hall was laid by the then viceroy of India, Lord Carzon in 1904. Dhaka Collegiate School was the first govt. school in Dhaka which was established in 1835. After six years in the same building, Dhaka College started its functioning. In 1912, the viceroy Lord Hardinge announced the scheme for the University of Dhaka which was formally established nine years after this announcement. The city has witnessed many ups and downs of history. The oppression of indigo planters led to agrarian revolt in 1850 and in 1857 occurred the great Sepoy Movement. The Language Movement took place in 1952 when Salam, Barkat, Rafiq and Jabbar laid down their lives. This movement ultimately paved the way for our War of Liberation in 1971,

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

Who/What Event Place/Time/Award/Others
Dhaka is a very ancient and (i) —
(ii) — was the civil surgeon of Dhaka
“Note on the Races, Castes and Trades of Eastern” was published (iii) —
(iv) — of Curzon Hall was laid In 1904
The language Movement (v) — in 1952

5. Summarize the above passage in no more than 90 words.

 

Read the passage on Stephen Hawking. Complete the following table with information from the passage.

Stephen Hawking is considered the greatest physicist after Einstein. He was born in 1942 in an educated family. He was very skilled in mathematics from an early age. He got married in 1963. He got his PhD in Cosmology from Cambridge University at the age of 26. At the age of thirty-two he received the prestigious Albert Einstein award for theoretical physics. In 1979, he joined Cambridge University as Lucasian professor of mathematics. He became famous for his investigations into the origins of the universe. He wrote the book ‘A brief history of time: From the big bang to the present times. It became famous and established his reputation as a great scientist. Since the age of thirty, he has been confined to wheelchair with no power to control his body except for some limited movement of his head and hands only. He can speak only through a computer with a voice synthesizer. He is provided with twenty-four-hour nursing facilities by an American organization for his physical well-being. He lives with his wife and three daughters.

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

Biography of Stephen Hawking
known as (i) —
Year Activity Description achievement/award
1968   (ii) —  
(iii) —   Received Albert Einstein award  
1972   (iv) —  
  Investigations into the origins of the universe   (v) —

5. Summarize the above passage in no more than 90 words.

 

Read the passage and complete the table below with information from the passage (4-5).

Kazi Nazrul Islam is a rebel poet ant our national poet. Kazi Nazrul Islam was born in 1306 BS (1899 AD) in the village of Churulia near Asansol in the Burdwan District. He was born in a powerful Muslim Taluqdar family and was the second of three sons and a daughter, Nazrul’s father Kazi Faqeer Ahmed was the imam and caretaker of the local mosque and mausoleum. Nazrul’s mother was Zahida Khatun. His nickname was Dukhu Mian. His family was devastated with the death of his father in 1908. At the age of ten he was admitted to a local primary school. He did not obey the hard and fast rule of the school. So he often fled away from the school. When he was 12, he fled away from home and took a job in a baker’s shop in the town of Asansol. At the age of nineteen he joined the army as an ordinary soldier in the British army. Nazrul left the army in 1920 and settled in Calcutta and started writings. He wrote a lot of poems, short stories, gajals, novels etc. and travelled all the branches of Bengali Literature. He published his first novel “Bandhanhara” in 1920. His famous poem “Bidrohi” stirred the whole nation.

His poems inspired our freedom fighters in the liberation war of Bangladesh. In 1942 at the age of 43 he began suffering from an unknown disease, losing his voice and memory. In 1972, he was brought to Bangladesh from Kolkata and was declared our national poet. He died on 29 August, 1976.

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

Biography of Kazi Nazrul Islam    
Known as (i) —  
Life span 77 Years  
Year Activity Description
1909 (ii) —  
(iii) —   Joined army
first novel   (iv) —
1972   (v) —

5. Summarize the above passage in no more than 90 words.

 

Read the passage and complete the table below with information from the passage (4-5).

Jibanananda Das was born in a small town of Barisal in 1899. He took his Master’s Degree in English at the age of 22. The next year he started his teaching career as a Professor of English at the Kolkata City College. He lost the job in 1928 on the charge of publishing a poem in the Parichaya Patrika. But two years after he joined the Ramjash College, Delhi but returned to his place of birth the next year. He got an appointment in Brajamohan College, Barisal in 1935. In 1947 when the partition was made, Jibanananda Das left Bangladesh for India. In West Bengal, he started editing the Swaraj Patrika. In 1951, he joined the Kharagpur College. He was awarded Rabindra Purashkar in 1953. He met with a tram accident on the 14th October, 1954. He was hospitalized. After a few days, he passed away on October 22, 1954.

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

Who/What Event/Activity where When
Jibanananda Das lost job   (i) —
A poem published (ii) —  
Jibanananda Das joined (iii) — in 1930
Jibanananda Das joined Brajamohan College (iv) —
Jibanananda Das joined (v) — in 1951

5. Summarize the above passage in no more than 90 words.

Read the passage and complete the table below with information from the passage (4-5).

Nelson Mandela was born on July 18, 1918 in South Africa. He has two nick-names: Madiba and Black Pimpernel. From his boyhood, he saw the cruelty of the White to the Black one. At that time, the White people bait the Black people. It was unbearable for little Mandela. Becoming actively involved in the antiapartheid movement in his 20s, Mandela joined the African National Congress in 1942. For 20 years he directed a peaceful and non-violent defiance against the South African Government. For this he was in the jail on Robben Island for 18 years. In 1993 Mandela and F.W de Klerk were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In 1994, Mandela was elected the South Africa’s first black President. In 2009, Mandela’s birthday, July 18, was declared Mandela Day’ by the UN. Mandela died at his home in Johannesburg on December 5, 2013 at the age of 95.

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

Who/What Event Where/Party When/Age
Mandela (i) — South Africa 1918
He involved himself (ii) — 1942
He was prisoned (iii) —  
(iv) — declared Mandela Day   2009
He died (v) — 2013

5. Summarize the above passage in no more than 90 words.

 

Read the passage and complete the table below with information from the passage (4-5).

Shelley was born on August 4, 1792 at Sussex in England. At the age of twelve he was sent to Eton, one of the best schools in England where he began to write. At the age of eighteen his first work was published. The same year he entered into the University of Oxford. But next year he was expelled from Oxford for writing pamphlet named. “The Necessity of Atheism”. He married Harriet Westbrook in 1812. Two years after their marriage a daughter was born to them. When he was twenty-three his grandfather died and he inherited a vast property. Shelley is known for his lyric poetry. His famous lyric “Ode to the West Wind” was written in 1819. Next year both the poems “The Cloud” and “To a skylark” were written. He died a premature death only at the age of thirty by a boat capsize.

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

Biography of Shelley
Lifespan (i) — to —
Year Event Where/Why
(ii) — Admitted to school ‘Eton’ (iii) —
(iv) — Entering into Oxford University to study
1811 was expelled from oxford (v) —

5. Write a summary of the passage in no more than 90 to 100 words.

 

Read the passage and complete the table below with information from the passage (4-5).

Rabindranath Tagore was born at Jorasanko in Calcutta on the 7th May, 1861. He has no regular school education. But his education was not neglected. From the very boyhood he began to write poems of great merit and charm. Under the personal care of his father, Debendranath Tagore, he gained a deep knowledge in Bengali, Sanskrit and English. He was a versatile genius. He was a poet, a dramatist, a story writer, a novelist, a critic and an essayist. Some of his best poems are found in the ‘Gitanjali,”Sonar Tari,”Kheya,’ ‘Kalpana,”Balaka,’ etc. For his ‘Gitanjali’ he got the Nobel Prize in literature in 1913. His novels and plays are of high order. His songs are now very popular in our country. He was a great educationist too. He had his own ideas as to how to educate the children for their all-round development. He established a school at Santiniketan and afterwards founded the University of Viswa Bharati.

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

Events When Where/In which field How/Why
(i) — 1861 Jorasanko  
Writing poems (ii) — Calcutta  
(iii) —   Bengali, Sanskrit & English by personal care of his father
Won Nobel Prize 1913 (iv) — for writing Gitanjali
(v) —   Santiniketan for educating children

5. Summarize the above passage in no more than 90 words.

 

Read the passage and complete the table below with information from the passage (4-5).

Robert Browning is one of the greatest Victorian poets. He is known as a psychological poet. He was born in Camber well in the outskirts of London in 1812. From his home and from his first school at Pokka, he could see London and the city light by day light. by night and the smoky chimneys by day. His schooling was short and desultory, his education being attended to by private tutors and by his father. Like Tennyson, this boy found his work very early. Then he fell under the influence of Shelly and his first known work Pauline in 1833. In 1846, he suddenly became famous, not because he finished in that year, his Bells and pomegranates but because he closed with the best known literary woman in England, Elizabeth Barrett. Browning gave his best-known volumes dramatic Lyrics in 1842, dramatic Romances and Lyrics 1845 and dramatic persona 1864. The Ring and the Book appeared in 1868, he had given to the world the noblest expression of his poetic genius. The death of Elizabeth Barrett is a great shock in his life. She suddenly died in 1861 and was buried in Florence. Browning died in 1889.

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

Biography of Robert Browning
Known as (i) —
Lifespan 1812 to 1889
who/What Event Time/Place
Dramatic Persona (ii) — 1864
(iii) — died 1861
The Ring and the Book appeared (iv) —
Browning (v) — Camber Well

5. Write a summary of the passage in no more than 90 to 100 words.

 

Read the passage and complete the table below with information from the passage (4-5).

Albert Einstein, the greatest scientist of the twentieth century and one of the supreme intellects of all times, was born in March 14, 1879 in the city of Ulm in Germany. He attended high school in Switzerland and became a Swiss citizen in 1901. He was appointed an examiner at the Swiss Patent Office in 1902. He served at this post for three years. He received his Ph. D. in 1905 from the University of Zurich, but was unable to find an academic position at that time. However, the same years he began to publish original papers on the theoretical aspects of problems of Physics. Within a few years, these papers, particularly the one on relativity, established his reputation as one of the most brilliant and original scientists in the world. His theories were highly controversial. In spite of this, he was appointed a professor at the University of Berlin, at the same time becoming a member of the Prussian Academy of Science. In 1921 he was awarded Nobel Prize for Physics. Einstein’s situation in Germany became precious when Hitler rose to power. He moved to Princeton, New Jersey, U.S.A. in 1933 to work at the Institute for Advanced Study and in 1940 he became a United States citizen. Einstein’s first marriage ended in divorce, but his second was quite happy. He had two children, both boys. He died in 1955 in Princeton.

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

Biography of Albert Einstein
Known as the greatest scientist of the twentieth century
Lifespan (i) — to —
Citizenship Country Year How
German Germany (ii) — By birth
Swiss Switzerland (iii) — Attending high school to Switzerland
American (iv) — 1940 (v) —

5. Write a summary of the passage in no more than 90 to 100 words.

 

Charles Dickens was born on 17th February in 1812 at Port Sea. His father was a clerk in the Navy pay office. At the age of 3 his family moved to Chatham. By that time his father got promotion in his service. But when Dickens was only 12 his father was arrested for debt and taken to the Marshal Sea Prison. The family had to fall in troubles. At the age of 12 Dickens was bound to take a job in Warren’s Black Factory owned by a relative. They had to live with hardship. Dickens again began his schooling but he left school again when he was 15. He took up the job of aft office boy in a farm. At the same time, he started learning short hand. In 1828, he left the job and became a shorthand writer. After two years he became a reporter of the press gallery of the House of Commons. At the age of 18 he began to write his first book sketched by Boz which appeared in 1831. Later he became a famous writer. At the age of fifty-eight he had a sudden stroke at dinner and died on the 9th June.

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

Biography of Charles Dickens    
Lifespan (i) — to —  
Who/ What Event Time
Family of Dickens moved to Chatham (ii) —
(iii) — arrested for debt 1828
A job in a factory (iv) — 1824
Dickens’ first look (v) — 1831

5. Write a summary of the passage in no more than 90 to 100 words.

 

Zahir Raihan was one of the most talented film makers in Bangladesh. He was born on 19 August 1935 in the village Majupur, in Feni district. He was an active worker of the Language Movement. He was one of the ten students to go out in a procession on 21 February 1952 despite a ban on such activities. As a result, he and many others were arrested and taken to prison. Zahir was also present at the historical meeting of Amtala on February 21, 1952. He also took part in the mass movement in 1969. In 1971, he joined the Liberation War. All through his life, Zahir dreamt for a democratic society, a society that will ensure freedom of speech and will. He had many dreams about our film industry too. He made a legendary film Jibon Theke Neya based on the Language Movement of 1952. It was a revolt against the then autocratic government. The family presented in that film was a miniature East Pakistan ruled by an autocrat who had to go to the prison for her conspiracy. During the liberation war this film was shown outside Bangladesh. Critics like Satyajit Ray, Mrinal Sen, and Ritwik Ghatak appreciated this film. Zahir gave all his money to the Freedom Fighters’ trust that he got from his film shows. Besides, his great documentary on Pakistani atrocities, Stop Genocide, helped create world sentiment in favour of our liberation war. On 30 December 1971, someone informed Zahir about an address somewhere at Mirpur, where he might find his brother, the famous writer Shahidullah Kaiser.

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

Biography of Zahir Raihan
Attend to (i) —
Lifespan 1935 to 1971
Information event/activities
His dream (ii) —
A legendary film Jibon Theke Neya (iii) —
(iv) — Great documentary
Shahidullah Kaiser (v) —

5. Write a summary of the passage in no more than 90 to 100 words.

 

The Nobel Prize is the world’s most prestigious and important prize. It has been given since 1901. This prize is given to persons with outstanding contributions to physics, chemistry, literature, medicine, peace and economics. Economics was added to the list in 1969 for the first time. The Noble prize was instituted by a man who was the inventor of dynamitic. This scientist was Alfred Bernard Nobel. He was born in Stockholm, Sweden on October 21, 1833 and he died in 1896. Though he was a citizen of Sweden, he was educated in Russia. He earned a huge sum of money by selling dynamite. At the time of his death in 1896, Nobel left behind a huge amount of money. He also left a will indicating that the interest on this money should be given as prizes to person for their outstanding contribution to physics, chemistry, medicine, literature and peace. This prize was named as Nobel Prize. The first Nobel Prize was given to Rontgen on 10th December, 1901 for his inventing X-rays.

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

Biography of Alfred Bernard Nobel
Known as Father of destruction
Invention      
Name of events place Year/ Time Achievement
Nobel Prize instituted   (ii) —  
Economics added to the list   (iii) —  
Alfred educated (iv) —    
    In 1901 (v) —

5. Write a summary of the passage in no more than 90 to 100 words.

 

Read the passage and complete the table below with information from the passage (4-5).

Jasimuddin was a famous Bengali poet. He was also a song writer, prose writer, folklore collector and radio personality. He is known as pollikobi because through his poems he depicted the Bengali rural life. He was born in the village of Tambulkhana in Faridpur District on 1 January 1903. He received his early education at Faridpur Welfare School. He obtained BA degree in Bangla from the University of Calcutta in 1929 and MA in 1931. Jasimuddin joined the University of Dhaka in 1938 as a lecturer. He left the university in 1944 and joined the Department of Information and Broad Casting. He worked there until his retirement in 1962 as Deputy Director. Jasimuddin collected more than 10,000 folk songs. He wrote many poems, dramas, novels, memoirs music etc. His major works are Rakhali, Nakshi Kanthar Math, Sojan Badiyar Ghat, Bedder Meye, Madhumala. The major honours and awards that received are President Award for Pride performance, Pakistan (1958), D. Lit by Rabindra Bharati University, India (1969), Ekushey Padak (1976), Bangladesh and Independence Day Award (1978). He died on 13 March 1976 and was buried near his ancestral home at Gobindapur.

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

Biography of Jasimuddin
Known as Pollikobi
Life span (i) — to —
Who/What Event/Activity Year/When Place/Where
He obtained BA degree (ii) — the University of Calcutta
He (iii) — 1938 the University of Dhaka
He joined (iv) — Department of Information and Broadcasting
He got President Award for Pride ICT performance 1958 (v) —

5. Write a summary of the passage in no more than 90 to 100 words.

 

Read the passage and complete the table below with information from the passage (4-5).

Captain Mohiuddin Jahangir was an officer in the Army during the Liberation War of 1971. He was born on 7 March, 1949 at Rahimganj Village uner Babugan Thana in Barishal District. He completed his HSC from Barishal BM Colege. In 1967, he took admission in the department of Statistic in Dhaka University On October 5, 1967 he joined the armed forces as a cadet in the Pakistan Military Academy. He was commissioned in the Engineering Corps in 1968. He was promoted to the rank of Captain on 30 August in 1970. He was an officer in Sector 7 of the Mukti Bahini. He was given the responsibility to fight at the Chapai Nawabganj border in Rajshahi. On 14 December 1971 he was killed in an attempt to break through the enemy defenses on the bank of the Mahananda River. He was buried near Sona Masjid. In recognition of his valor and sacrifice in the Liberation War, Mohiuddin Jahangir was awarded with the highest state honor of Birsrestho.

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

Captain Mohiuddin Jahangir    
Speciality One of the greatest freedom fighters to attain martyrdom  
Recognition Birshrestho  
Event/ Activity Where/ Place When
Born Rahimganj (i) —
(ii) — Dhaka University 1967
Joined as a cadet (iii) — 1967
(iv) — in the Engineering Corps 1968
Was killed on the bank of Mahananda (v) —

5. Write a summary of the passage in no more than 90 to 100 words.

 

Read the following text carefully and answer the question no. 4 and 5:

Mammals are animals with fur and they feed their babies on milk. Many pet and farm animals are mammals, including dogs, cats, rabbits, cows and sheep. Men are mammals too. Bats are the only mammals that can fly. They also have such good hearing that they can fly in the dark. They live on moths, mice or soft fruits. The Cheetah is the fastest mammals. It can run faster than 60 miles an hour. Cheetah eats flesh of other animals. Most of the mammals have four legs and a tail. But mammals like dolphins and whales have fins and flippers instead of legs and they live in water. Dolphins love to leap out of the water and splash back in. They chase after food such as fish. The biggest whales such as humpback have a mouth full of comb like plates to sieve out their food from the water. They mostly eat tiny shrimps called krill

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

Mammals
Main focus (i) – of various types of mammals
Types of animals Habitation Characteristics Food
Bats land and trees can fly in the dark (ii) —
Cheetah joined (iii) —  
Dog enlisted (iv) —  
(v) —   sieve out food from water fish

5. Write a summary of the passage in no more than 90 to 100 words.

 

Munshi Abdur Rouf was a Lance Nayek in East Pakistan Rifles during the Bangladesh Liberation War. Munshi Abdur Rouf was born on 1 May, 1943 at Salamatpur village under Boalmari thana (currently Madhukhali thana) in Faridpur district. Rouf had to stop his education at his eighth grade. He joined the East Pakistan Rifles on 8 May, 1963. He had to increase his age three years in order to get the job. After the preliminary. training at the EPR Camp at Chuadanga, Rouf went to West Pakistan to receive advanced training. He was enlisted in the East Bengal Regiment on May 1963 and was attached with a regular infantry unit during the War of Liberation. Munshi Abdur Rouf embraced. martyrdom on 18 April 1971 at Kurighat in Chattogram Hill tracts after causing extensive damage to Pakistan Army with his MG and forcing them to retreat. He was buried at Naniarchor upazilla in Rangamati district. He was awarded Birsreshtho, which is the highest recognition of bravery in Bangladesh.

4. Read the passage again. Now, complete the table with relevant information from the text.

Munshi Abdur Rouf
Life span Born in 1943 and died in (i) —
Specialty Awarded the highest recognition of bravery ‘Birshrestho
Who/ What Event/Activity Year Place/ Where
He joined (ii) — the East Pakistan Rifles
He enlisted 1963 (iii) —
He (iv) — 1971 at Kurighat in Chitagong Hill tracts
He was buried 1971 (v) —

5. Write a summary of the passage in no more than 90 to 100 words.

 

Read the text and answer the questions.

Abraham Lincoln was the 16th president of the USA. He is famous for his Gettysburg Address. It was delivered by him during the American Civil War, on November 19, 1863. Lincoln was born on February 12, 1809 in Kentucky, the USA. His parents were from Virginia. In 1819, his mother died. Then his father moved to Indiana state. He grew up there. He was a captain in the Black Hawk War. He got the nomination for president in 1860. Then he became the President of the USA. In 1861. Lincoln declared a ban on slavery in America on January 1, 1863. He was reelected President in 1864. On Good Friday, April 14, 1865, he was assassinated at Ford’s theater in Washington. 

4. Read the passage and complete the table below with information from the passage:

Biography of Abraham Lincoln
Speciality 16th president of the USA
Famous for his Gettysburg Address
Name of Events Place Year/Time Contribution
Born (i) —
(ii) — November 19, 1863
Became the President (iii) —
in 1863 (iv) —
Died (v) —

5. Write a summary of the passage in not more than 90 to 100 words. 

 

Read the passage carefully and answer the questions following it. (4-5).

Bangladesh is an independent country. It came into being in 1971. It did not come automatically. In 1947 Pakistan became independent consisting of East and west Pakistan. Bangladesh was the then East Pakistan. From the very beginning west Pakistan tried to exploit us. They tried to deprive us of the state language. In 1952 we established our right through the Language Movement. Later the election of 1954, the Education Movement of 1962, Mass Movement of 1969 and the election of 1970 were our glorious achievements. In 1971, the Military Govt. did not transfer power to the majority party. Rather on 25 March 1971 the Pak Army started killing public brutally. As a result, our war of Freedom began. On 17 April Acting Government of Bangladesh was formed at Meherpur. The members of Army, Navy, Police. EPR of East Pakistan and young people joined the Freedom Fight. After nine month’s struggle we were able to achieve complete independence defeating the Pakistani Army on 16 December, 1971. So the 16th December is our victory Day.

4. Complete the following table with the information given in the passage.

About the independence of Bangladesh
Birth in 1971
the name of events Place Year/time Achievement
(i) — in 1969 Formed Acting Government of Bangladesh (ii) … the Language Movement in (iii) — 16 December, 1971 (iv) —

 

    Beginning of the war of Independence (iv) —  

5. Write a summary of the passage in not more than 90 to 100 words. 

 

Read the following text carefully and answer questions 4 and 5        

The world is full of great men. They have come to different places of this world. Dr. Mohammad Shahidullah was one of those who contributed a lot towards the Bengali language and literature. He was the greatest scholar of Bengal. The great scholar was born at 24 Pangrams in West Bengal on 10th July, 1885. He passed the entrance Examination in 1904. He obtained his B.A. degree in 1910, M.A. in 1912 and B.L. in 1914. He joined the University of Dhaka in 1921 as a professor of Sanskrit and Bengali. He was awarded the Doctorate Degree from Sorboe University of Paris in 1928. His` Bangle Shahitter katha’ published in 1953 was the first well-arranged history of Bengali literature. In 1966 he was seriously ill and was in sick bed for about two and a half years. The great scholar breathed his last on 13 July, 1969 in Dhaka. We all remember him with gratitude and respect.

4. Complete the following table with the information given in the passage. 1×5=5

About Dr. Mohammad Shahidullah
Speciality greatest scholar of Bengal
Contribution Bengali language and literature
Name/who/what Event/Activity What/Where/When
Dr. Mohammad Shahidullah was born (i) —
He (ii) — 1921
He (iii) — Sorboe University of Paris
Bangla Shahitter katha (iv) — 1953
He died (v) —

5. Write a summary of the passage in not more than 90 to 100 words.

 

Read the following text carefully and answer questions 4 and 5

Feroza’s childhood was full of sufferings and sorrows. In 1972 at the age of 12 she was married to a 24-year old unemployed man in Chittagong. Feroza entered into her husband’s house with the dreams and hopes of a young girl but all she saw was more want. When her first son was born she was 19. Feroza’s toiling days became harder with the birth of her second son in 1982. Her husband was still unwilling to work and therefore she had to work even harder to feed all the five mouths. When she was 24 her third son was born. Each day became more difficult for Feroza. No matter how hard she worked she could never earn enough to feed everyone. Eight years went by and Feroza was still struggling for herself and her family. Then she came to learn about the Grameen Bank. She became a member of the Bank, took a loan and started her own ‘rice-husking’ business. Gradually she managed to improve her conditions and managed to repay the loan. In 1995 Feroza took an even larger loan and started a stationery shop alongside her husking business. She went to the adult literacy centre and learned to read and write. By 2000 Feroza’s worst days were over. She had solvency, security and happiness.

About Feroza’s childhood
condition (i) —
Who Event/ Activity Place/ where Time/ year
Feroza was born Chittagong (ii) —
Her husband (iii) — Chittagong 1972
(iv) — Birth Chittagong 1979
she learn about the Grameen Bank    
she (v) — From Grameen Bank In 1995

5. Write a summary of the passage in not more than 90 to 100 words.

 

Read the following text carefully and answer questions 4 and 5

Florence Nightingale did not like easy and pleasant occupations of society; instead of going our parties, she visited London hospitals and studied how sick people were nursed back to health and strength. In those days, hospital nurses were very ignorant and she was shocked by the roughness and mismanagement that prevailed in those hospitals. So, she went to Germany and studied nursing there and then she went to Paris. At last, when she was quite certain, she had mastered her subject. She returned to England and began her work of improving the nursing in the hospitals. While she was engaged at this work, a war broke out in Crimea between Russia and England. At first, people thought only of the glory of the battle and the courage of the soldiers who went singing to their death. But soon other stories came to England, dreadful stories of the wounded being left to die. England was shocked by these things and everybody cried out that something heroic must be done to stop the sufferings of the brave soldiers. That was done by Florence Nightingale. She went to Crimea with less than forty nurses and in a few months she had succeeded in transforming the nursing of the solders.

4. Complete the following table with the information given in the passage.

About Florence Nightingale
Disliking easy and pleasant occupations
Ambition nursing
Name/who Event/Activity What/Where
Florence Nightingale disliked (i) —
 She (ii) — hard tasks
She visited (iii) —
She (iv) — Germany and Paris
She returned (v) —

5. Summarize the text in section A in your own words (around 85 words)

 

Read the following text carefully and answer questions 4 and 5

Hazrat Muhammad (SM.) is the last prophet of Allah and the leader of all prophets. He was born the famous Quash tribe of Mecca in 570 A. D.  His father Abdullah died before his birth, and his mother Amena died when he was only six. He was brought up by a nurse named Halima, grandfather Abdul Muttalib and uncle Abu Taleb. At last at the age of 25 he married a widow named Khadija. He retired to the cave of Mount Hire and meditated on the problems of life and death. At last at the age of forty light dawned upon him and he got the new truth. The new faith was first accepted by his wife Khadija. Then they put every difficult in his path, subjected his followers to severe tortures and tried to kill him. So for the sake of religion he sent man of his followers to Medina and then in 622 A. D. he himself went there. This is called the Hijrat. From this date the Islamic era Hijri began. The prophet and his followers were forced to fight a number of battles like Bandar, Ohud and Khandak. At last the prophet conquered Mecca in 630 A.D. and succeeded in bringing all Arabia to his faith. This great and noble soul passed away in 632 A. D. at the age of 63. At present on fifth of the people of the world are the followers of this great and noble prophet.

4. Complete the following table with the information given in the passage.

The life of Hazrat Muhammad (SM.)      
Life span 570 A. D to 632 A. D.    
Speciality (i) —    
Who Event/ Activity Place/ where Time/ year
Hazrat Muhammad (SM.) (ii) — Mecca 595 A. D
He (iii) — Mecca 610 A. D
He (iv) — Medina 622 A. D
He Conquered  Mecca   (v) —
Muhammad (SM.) Died Medina 632 A. D

5. Write a summary of the passage in not more than 90 to 100 words. 

 

Read the following text carefully and answer questions 4 and 5

Hobbies are activities that we pursue in our leisure time. People’s hobbies and interests keep on changing according to their gender and age. For example, kids are always curious, so they choose hobbies where they can discover things. They like hobbies like reading, stamp collecting. coin collecting, gardening, riding bicycles etc. Whenever women choose their hobbies, they pursue creative skills, they use their imagination, So, they are fond of latest fashion, innovative cooking, stitching, gardening as their hobbies, Men want to do more challenging and thrilling things as pastime. They like traveling, driving, fling, mountaineering.

4. Complete the table below with information from the above passage.

About People’s hobby
meaning pursuance in leisure time
Different types of hobbies Different types of people Age Causes of interest
Reading, stamp collecting etc (i)…… 6-18 (ii)……
Stitching, cooking etc. Women Over 18 (iii)…..
Traveling, driving etc (iv)…… (v)….. Challenge and thrill

5. Write a summary of the passage in not more than 90 to 100 words. 

 

Read the following text carefully and answer questions 4 and 5

It was the eve of World War 2, October 1938. Mrs Smith sat on her favourite rocking chair and closed her eyes. It was a long tiring day. She looked out of the window; it was dark – quite dark. The tension of the war hung in the air. Mrs Smith was restless. Her husband William Smith and son William Smith Junior were off to the border. She switched on the radio and a deep male voice floated in. It was an invasion alarm! What actually happened on that night was Orson. Welles and his Mercury Theatre presented a radio adaptation of H.G. Well’s novel ‘War of the Worlds’ on the air. Wells meant the programme to be a Halloween joke. But the beginning of the programme was missed by many listeners. They mistook it for news coverage of an actual invasion of the USA. Panic spread from one end of the country to the other. A number of people died as a result of accidents or by suicide.

4. Read the passage and complete the table below with information from the passage:

About the effect of misreprestation of mass media
Time eve of World War 2
Who Event/ what Place/ where Time/ year
Mrs Smith (i) — on rocking chair October 1938
(ii) — Joined the war to the border October 1938
Orson Welles and his Mercury Theatre (iii) —   eve of World War 2
H.G. Well’s novel (iv) — on the air October 1938
A number of people (v) — USA eve of World War 2

5. Write a summary of the passage in not more than 90 to 100 words. 

 

Read the text and answer the questions.

Jasimuddin was a famous Bengali poet. He was also a song writer, prose writer, folk lore collector and radio personality. He is known as Pollikobi because through his poems he depicted the Bengali rural life, He was born in the village of Tambulkhana in Faridpur District on 1 January 1903. He received his early education at Faridpur Welfare School. He obtained BA degree in Bangla from the University of Calcutta in 1929 and MA in 1931. Jasimuddin joined the University of Dhaka in 1938 as a lecturer. He left the university in 1944 and joined the Department of Information and Broad Casting. He worked there until his retirement in 1962 as Deputy Director. Jasimuddin collected more than 10,000 folk songs. He wrote many poems, dramas, novels, memoirs music etc. His major works are Rakhaki, Nakshi kanthar Maath, Sojan Badiyar Ghat, Bedher Meye, Madhumala etc. The major awards and honors that he received are President Award for Pride performance (1958), Bangladesh and Independence Day Award (1978). He died on 13 March 1976 and was buried near his ancestral home at Gobindopur.

4. Read the passage and complete the table below with information from the passage:

Biography of Jasimuddin
known as Pollikobi
Speciality a song writer, prose writer, folk lore collector and radio personality
Who/What Event/Activity Year/When Place/Where
Jashimuddin born 1903 (i) —
He obtained BA degree   (ii) — the University of Calcutta
He (iii) — 1938 the university of Dhaka
He joined (iv) — department of Information and Broad Casting
He got president award for pride performance 1958 (v) —

5. Write a summary of the passage in not more than 90 to 100 words.

 

Read the following passage carefully and complete the table below with information from the passage

Louise Pasteur was a French chemist and microbiologist. He is remembered for his remarkable invention of the causes and preventions of diseases. He was born on December 27, 1822 in Dole, Jura, French. He entered primary school in 1831. In 1838he left for Paris to join the Institution of Barbet but became homesick and returned home. In 1839 he got into the college Royal de Beasancon and received B.A. degree in 1840. He did his B.Sc. in Chemistry from the Dijon in 1842. He received his medical license in 1845 as a doctor. He was appointed Professor of Physics at the Dijon Lycee in 1848. He invented the vaccines for Rabies in 1886. He died on September 28, 1895 at the age of 72.

4. Read the passage and complete the table below with information from the passage:

Biography of Jasimuddin
Speciality French chemist and microbiologist
Event   Place  Year/Time Contribution
Born (i) —
Received B.Sc in Chemistry (ii) — (iii) —
Received medical license (iv) —
in 1886 (v) —

5. Write a summary of the passage in no more than 60 to 70 words.

 

Read the following passage carefully and complete the table below with information from the passage

Louise Pasteur was a French chemist and microbiologist. He is remembered for his remarkable invention of the causes and preventions of diseases. He was born on December 27, 1822 in Dole, Jura, French. He entered primary school in 1831. In 1838he left for Paris to join the Institution of Barbet but became homesick and returned home. In 1839 he got into the college Royal de Beasancon and received B.A. degree in 1840. He did his B.Sc. in Chemistry from the Dijon in 1842. He received his medical license in 1845 as a doctor. He was appointed Professor of Physics at the Dijon Lycee in 1848. He invented the vaccines for Rabies in 1886. He died on September 28, 1895 at the age of 72.

4. Read the passage and complete the table below with information from the passage:

Biography of Jasimuddin
Speciality French chemist and microbiologist
Event   Place  Year/Time Contribution
Born (i) —
Received B.Sc in Chemistry (ii) — (iii) —
Received medical license (iv) —
in 1886 (v) —

5. Write a summary of the passage in no more than 60 to 70 words.

 

Read the following text carefully and answer question 4 and 5.

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela was born on 18 July, 1918 in Mvezo, South Africa. He was an anti-apartheid revolutionary, politician, and philanthropist. He was South Africa’s first black elected in a democratic election. In 1961, he led a sabotage campaign against the apartheid government. In 1962, he was arrested, convicted of conspiracy to overthrow the state, and sentenced to life imprisonment. He served over 27 years in prison. He was released in 1990, during a time of escalating civil strife. Mandela joined negotiations with President F. W. de Klerk to abolish apartheid and establish multiracial elections in 1994, in which he led the ANC to victory and became South Africa’s first black president. He served as President of South Africa from 1994 to 1999. He received more than 250 honours, including the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize, the US Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Soviet Order of Lenin and the Bharat Ratna, etc. He is held in deep respect within South Africa as Madiba, or Tata Father.. He is often described as ‘the father of the nation’. He died on 5 December, 2013 in Houghton Estate, South Africa.  

4. Complete the following table with the information given in the passage.

Biography of Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela
Speciality anti-apartheid revolutionary, politician, and philanthropist
Who/What Information Time/ when Place/ where
Nelson Mandela (i) — 8 July, 1918 Mvezo, South Africa
He led sabotage campaign (ii) — (iii) —
He (iv) — (v) — South Africa

Answer to the question no-4.

i. was born; ii. 1961; iii. South Africa; iv. served as President; v. 1994 to 1999.     

5. Write a summary of the passage in not more than 90 to 100 words. 

 

Read the passage carefully and answer the question 4 and 5.

Sher-E-Bangla is one of the most popular leaders of Bangladesh. He was born in 1873 at Chakhar in Barisal. His father Mohammad Wazed Ali was a famous lawyer. He passed the Entrance Examination and went to Calcutta for higher studies. At the age of 22 he passed the M.A and was placed in the first division. After two years, he obtained B.L. degree with distinction and joined the Bar. At the age of 33, he was opinion with govt. In 1913, he became the member of Bengal Council. In 1915, he was made General Secretary of Indian Congress. In the same year he was made President of All India Muslim League. He was the Chief Minister of Bengal. In 1924, he established many educational institutions in Bengal as an Education Minister. He was the Mayor of Calcutta Corporation in 1935-36. In 1937, he was the first elected Prime Minister of Bengal. On 23rd March1940 he proposed his historical Pakistan resolution in Lahore Conference of Muslim League. He led the united front in the general election of East Pakistan until 1958. He died at the age of 89. People of Bangladesh remember him with gratitude.

4. Fill in the blanks of the table below with the information from the passage. 

Biography of Sher-E-Bangla
Life span From 1873 to 1962
Year Event  Place
(i) — Sher-E-Bangla obtained M.A. degree   
1915 He took part in an election (ii) —
1940 (iii) — Lahore Conference
(iv) — He obtained B.L. degree  
(v) — He died  

5. Write a summary of the passage in not more than 90 to 100 words. 

 

Read the following text carefully and answer question 4 and 5.

Suchitra Sen, a legendary Indian actress, was born on 6 April, 1931 in Pabna, Bangladesh. Her father Karunamoy Dasgupta was the headmaster of the local school and her mother Indira Devi was a homemaker. She was their fifth child and third daughter. She received herformal education in Pabna. Partition threw off her family to West Bengal. She was the first Indian actress to receive an award at an international film festival. In 1972, she was awarded the Padma Shri, one of the highest civilian awards in India. From 1979 on, she retreated herself from public life. In 2005, she refused the Dadasaheb Phalke Award, the highest cinematic award in India. In 2012, she was conferred the West Bengal Government’s highest honour: Banga Bibhushan. She departed on 17 January, 2014 in Kolkata, India.

4. Complete the following table with the information given in the passage.

Biography of Suchitra Sen
Speciality a legendary Indian actress
Name/ Who Information Time/ When Place/ Where
Suchitra Sen (i) — on 6 April, 1931 (ii) —
(iii) — was awarded the Padma Shri in 1972 (iv) —
Suchitra Sen departed (v) — in Kolkata, India

5. Write a summary of the passage in not more than 90 to 100 words.

 

Read the text and answer the questions 4 and 5:

William Shakespeare (1564 – 1616) was born at Stratford-upon-Avon in a house in Henley Street. This is preserved intact. His mother, Mary Arden, was one of the daughters of Robert Arden, a yeoman farmer of Wilmore: his father, John Shakespeare, was a Glover and wool dealer of good standing who held the office of Bailiff of the Borough in 1568. From the age of seven to about 14, he attended Stratford Grammar School receiving an excellent well-rounded education. At the age of 18 Shakespeare married Anne Hathaway, who was seven years his senior and three months pregnant. She was of ‘yeoman’ stock – her family owned a farm one mile west of Stratford in Shottery. He endured her until he could stand it no longer and fled to London to become an actor. He then became actor-manager and part-owner in the Black friars and afterwards the Globe Theatres. Shakespeare’s acting career was spent with the Lord Chamberlain’s Company, where he was a first-rate actor. The company was renamed the King’s Company in 1603 when James succeeded to the throne. Among the actors in the group was the famous Richard Burbage. The partnership acquired interests in two theatres in the Southward area of London, near the banks of the Thames – the Globe and the Black friars. Shakespeare returned to Stratford for his later years where he died at the age of 52 and now lies at rest in his special grave at Holy Trinity Church.

4. Complete the following table with the information given in the passage.   

Biography of William Shakespeare
Speciality Greatest dramatist
Who/ what Event/ activity Where/whom When
William Shakespeare lived with his family Stratford (i) —
He married (ii) — 1582
He (iii) —   1592
He died (iv) — 1616
He returned Stratford (v) —

5. Write a summary of the passage in not more than 90 to 100 words. 

 

Read the passage carefully and answer question 4.

William Wordsworth was a major English romantic poet. He was born on April 7, 1770, in Cocker Mouth, Cumberland, Lake District of England. He was born into a remarkable family. His father was an attorney. Dorothy, his younger sister, was his best friend. In 1778 when he was only seven, his mother died. And that year he first went to Grammar School. In his childhood, he learnt poetry of Milton and Shakespeare from his father. His father died in 1783 and then he became dependent on his relatives. He first wrote a poem (sonnet) in 1787. In 1787 he went to St. John’s College, Cambridge. And he graduated from that college in 1791. Then he went with his friends on a walking tour to France and Italy. He spent the next year there. While in France he fell in love with a French woman Annette Vallon.

He was greatly influenced by the French Revolution in 1791. He had a close friendship with another romantic poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Wordsworth also traveled with Dorothy and Coleridge. They Jointly published a book named Lyrical Ballads in 1798. In this book they explained their new poetic theory. They introduce a new idea of poems. He was poet laureate of England.

4. Complete the following table with the information given in the passage.

Biography of William Wordsworth
Speciality romantic poet
The name of events place year/Time Achievement
Birth (i) —    
Learning poetry of Milton and Shakespeare (ii) —    
Death of his father    (iii) —  
French revolution (iv) —    
  In 1798   (v) —

5. Write a summary of the passage in not more than 90 to 100 words.

 

Class 11-12, First Paper, Model Questipns, SUMMARY and THEME

Summary and theme

Summary and theme

 

Amidst killer speeds I stand

Facing the traffic, stretching my hand.

I am seen on kids’ books and as cartoons everywhere

Educating people and asking them to beware

Of the erratic traffic and the signboards

Seen on almost all the roads.

So that you’re safe

I see each one of you

But my sweat, my plight on the road sees who?

Be it sunny or rainy,

For your safety I must be

Vigil and agile, on the middle

Standing erect, as fit as a fiddle.

Oh! My ear hurts! Oh! My head aches!

Oh! Look at the weather…such unpredictable days!

But I cannot swerve; I must be on duty.

I care for your safety.

Be it noisy or dusty;  Be it sunny or rainy;

I must be on duty. I care for your safety

Theme: The poem is all about the life of a traffic policeman. He is a very familiar figure all over the world. A traffic policeman leads a very risky and tiresome life but no one pays heed to him. He has to carry on his duties in all circumstances. He is always concerned about the safety of the people on the roads.
Summary: The poem narrates the tale of routine work of a traffic police. The police stand in the middle of deadly speeding vehicles and with his stretching hand he regulates the traffic, controls speed, stops and allows them. He is a familiar figure depicted in children’s books educating people and warning about violations of traffic rules. His task is to ensure safety of those travelling in the vehicles and for that he has to routinely remain alert amidst deafening noise of horns, sounds. He endures these and had weathers but remains on duty for people’s safety guiding traffic.

 

Blow, blow, thou winter wind,

William Shakespeare

Blow, blow, thou winter wind,

Thou art not so unkind

As man’s ingratitude ;

Thy tooth is not so keen,

Because thou art not seen,

Although thy breath be rude.

Heigh-ho! sing heigh-ho! unto the green holly:

Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly:

Then heigh-ho, the holly!

This life is most jolly.

Freeze, freeze, thou bitter sky,

That dost not bite so nigh

As benefits forgot:

Though thou the waters warp,

Thy sting is not so sharp

As friend remembered not.

High-ho! sing heigh-ho! unto the green holly…

Theme: The contrast between nature and human beings is nicely depicted in the poem. The ingratitude of human being is shown to be harsher and crueler than the winter wind. Again, breach of trust anti betrayal of friends and relatives are shown to be crueller and harsher than the forces of nature.
Summary: The bitter cold of winter is not so bitterly felt as the ungratefulness of man. The insincerity of a friend is bitter. Love is foolish and the frozen. Sky-is not so bitter as the betrayal of man. When the beneficiary forgets the benefits, it is more bitter than the biting sky. The sting of water warp is not more bitter than the friend who forgets friendship.

 

The School Boy
by William BlakeI love to rise in a summer morn,
When the birds sing on every tree;
The distant huntsman winds his horn,
And the sky-lark sings with me.
O! what sweet company.But to go to school in a summer morn,
O! it drives all joy away;
Under a cruel eye outworn.
The little ones spend the day,
In sighing and dismay.
Ah! then at times I drooping sit,
And spend many an anxious hour,
Nor in my book can I take delight,
Nor sit in learnings bower,
Worn thro’ with the dreary shower.
How can the bird that is born for joy,
Sit in a cage and sing.
How can a child when fears annoy.
But droop his tender wing.
And forget his youthful spring.

O! father & mother. if buds are nip’d,
And blossoms blown away,
And if the tender plants are strip’d
Of their joy in the springing day,
By sorrow and care’s dismay.

How shall the summer arise in joy.
Or the summer fruits appear.
Or how shall we gather what griefs destroy
Or bless the mellowing year.
When the blasts of winter appear.

Theme: The presentation of innocence as freedom from constraint and self-consciousness is the main theme of the poem. Here the child starts out taking pleasure in an uninhibited life, full of trust in his world, both natural and human. The fragility of this state is clear from images as ‘blossoms’ and ‘tender plants are stripped. The child soon experiences the ‘woe’ in life leading to failure and betrayal.
Summary: In the poem a young school boy appreciates the beauty and joy that a summer day brings when birds sing, huntsman blows his horn, and skylark gives sweet company. On such a day the idea of going to school take away all joy because the children have to spend the whole joyless day under the stern teacher’s discipline and watch. The lessons that he gives are not enjoyed by the children who looks for the escape from such chains. Young children are birds of freedom born for unbounded joy not to be caged in like this. Therefore, the boy fervently appeals to his parents not to send him to school where his tender mind will be destroyed. Lie should be allowed freedom to enjoy not to be tainted by grief and worry which would bear no fruit in future.

 

‘Out, Out‘

 Robert Frost

The buzz saw snarled and rattled in the yard

And made dust and dropped stove-length sticks of wood,

Sweet-scented stuff when the breeze drew across it.

And from there those that lifted eves could count

Five mountain ranges one behind the other

Under the sunset far into Vermont

And the saw snarled and rattled, snarled and rattled,

As it ran light. or had to bear a load.

And nothing happened : day was all but done.

Call it a day. I wish they might have said

To please the boy by giving him the half hour

That a boy counts so much when saved from work.

His sister stood beside him in her apron

To tell them ‘Supper’. At the word, the saw.

As if to prove saws knew what supper meant.

Leaped out at the boy’s hand, or seemed to leap

He must have given the hand. However it was,

Neither refused the meeting. But the hand!

Theme: The way how modern mechanical society forced a young boy and his sister to become victims of its atrocities is nicely shown here. The young boy, though supposed to spend his time in playing, is bound to work in a sawmill being pressed by the cruelty of reality which is another important factor here.
Summary: The poem speaks of a boy put under heavy burden of work where from there seems to be no escape. Even a small respite and call for supper by his sister seems to be a great relief. That thinking of escape and freedom from such drudgery makes brings a little mindfulness. That causes the accident of the saw he is using to make firewood. His hand is cut. His appeal is to save his hand and save his life. But he sees life going out. Doctor’s treatment comes of no help. He dies. Others just find the loss of this boy’s life not much important and go back to their usual work.

 

I Have Seen Bengal’s Face

Jibanananda Das

Translation of Jibanananda Das’s “Banglar Mukh Ami Dekhiyachhi” by Fakrul Alam

Because I have seen Bengal’s face I will seek no more;

The world has not anything more beautiful to show me.

Waking up in darkness, gazing at the fig-tree, I behold

Dawn’s swallows roosting under huge umbrella-like leaves. I look around me

And discover a leafy dome-Jam, Kanthal, Bat, Hijol and Aswatha trees-

All in a hush, shadowing clumps of cactus and zedoary bushes.

When long, long ago, Chand came in his honeycombed boat

To a blue Hijal, Bat and Tamal shade near the Champa, he too sighted

Bengal’s incomparable beauty. One day, alas. In the Ganguri,

On a raft, as the waning moon sank on the river’s sandbanks,

Behula too saw countless aswaths bats besides golden rice fields

And heard the thrush’s soft song. One day, arriving in Amara,

Where gods held court, when she danced like a desolate wagtail,

Bengal’s rivers, fields, flowers, wailed like strings of bells on her feet.

Theme: This poem expresses the poet’s pure love for his native land. The poet provides a picturesque description of the transparent beauty and grace of his land. He is reluctant to see anything more after he has seen the unique beauty of this country. In his view, the country is full of attractive sight, sound, shade, the song of birds, fields and rivers. The ancient people and even the mythical character Behula observed this beauty of nature. The poet also -hints at the sadness of the people at the end of the poem.
Summary: The poem is about the poet’s expression of intense love for his motherland. His love for the country is so deep that he poetically expresses that he would like to come back to this beautiful dear land again and again in life after life. As the poet is Hindu by religion and believes in transmigration of soul, he affirms that even if he has to take birth as an inferior creatures like a kite or magpie to come back here he would do so. He narrates the exquisite beauty of this land-Bengal where trees are green, birds abound, old traditions and myths remained alive. The memories of life’s association with.

 

Dreams

D. H. Lawrence

All people dream, but not equally.      

Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their mind,

Wake in the morning to find that it was vanity.

But the dreamers of the day are dangerous people,

For they dream their dreams with open eyes.

And make them come true.

Theme: The dream is the central idea of the poem. Different people have different dreams. Those people who dream unconsciously or subconsciously cannot make their dream true but those who dream consciously can make their dream fruitful.
Summary: The theme of the poem is dreaming. The poet is telling in the poem that dreams in sleep are untrue and lead to nothing. But dreaming consciously is like determining for something. Therefore, one who dreams when fully awake or aware is very strong resolute and determined person and they realize their dreams.

 

“Dreams”

Langston Hughes

Hold fast to dreams

For if dreams die

Life is a broken-winged bird

That cannot fly.

Hold fast to dreams

For when dreams go

Life is a barren field

Frozen with snow

Theme: The poet here has highlighted the importance of dreams in men’s lives. He says that nothing can be achieved if there is no dream in life. To fulfill the desire and achieve goals, one must dream. Without dreams, the prospect of improving life is impossible because no dream means no dreams achieved. A life without dreams has no purpose. It becomes weary, monotonous and lifeless. So one must not stop dreaming because dreams bring comfort, solace and hope in the real world.
Summary: The theme of the poem is dreams. The poet wants to say here that dreams are very important for life. For, if there are no dreams in life one cannot advance far like a broken winged bird. Without dreams life becomes joyless, tasteless and not worthy of living. Here dreams are not the dreams we see in sleep. Dream means goals, higher aim and objective in life.

 

The Lake Isle of Innisfree

W.B. Yeats

I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree,

And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made;

Nine bean rows will I have there, a hive for the honey bee

And live alone in the bee loud glade.

 

 And I shall have some peace there, for peace comes dropping slow

Dropping from the veils of the moing to where the cricket sings;

There midnight’s all a glimmer, and noon a purple glow,

And evening full of the linnet’s wings.

 

 I will arise and go now, for always night and day

I hear lake water lapping with low sounds by the shore;

While I stand on the roadway, or on the pavements grey,

I hear it in the deep heart’s core.

 

Theme: Being tired of urban life, the poet here longs for the peace and tranquillity of Innisfree, a place free from urban noise and chaos. So, he wants to build a cabin there with clay and reeds to live in. There he will have a garden with exactly nine bean rows. There will be dim midnight, bright noon and musical evening. Really, the poet talks about absolute peace where rapid industrial progress in modern society is creating hectic madness among people running attar material progress only abandoning nature.
Summary: The poem speaks of the poet’s plan and dream of a life in peace and tranquility. He waits to go to Innisfree lake area to live in that peaceful place in the company of bees. Each would come normally in that lap of tranquil nature. Summer’s night and day will pass amidst the peaceful singing of birds, murmuring sound of the lake. The poet will enjoy in full standing on the road breathing it in.

 

From September 1, 1939 

W. H. Auden

 I sit on one of the dives

On Fifty-second Street

Uncertain and afraid

As the clever hopes expire.

Of a low dishonest decade:

Waves of anger and fear

Circulate over the bright

And darkened lands of the earth,

Obsessing our private lives;

The unmentionable odour of death

Offends the September night. 

Theme: The poem depicts the poet’s uncertainty and fear regarding the outbreak of the Second World War. Sitting in a bar, the poet observes that the people who are the victims of World War II have lost their mind and so all the hopes and aspirations of future development diminish away. This is the decade of dishonesty. Anger and fear are darkening the lands of the earth and wrecking the people’s private lives. There is nothing but the toll of death all around, which commenced on the September night.
Summary: The poet here is sitting in concern, worries, and hopes fading and feels around the wave of fear that is gripping the world. War and destruction and death are laboring in the horizon as the poet senses.

 

The Charge of the Light Brigade

Lord Alfred Tennyson

Half a league, half a league,

Half a league onward,

All in the valley of Death,

Rode the six hundred.

“Forward, the Light Brigade!

Charge for the guns” he said:

Into the valley of Death

Rode the six hundred.

“Forward, the Light Brigade!”

Was there a man dismay’d?

Not tho’the soldiers knew

Some one had blunder’d:

Theirs not to make reply,

Theirs not to reason why,

Theirs but to do and die:

Into the valley of Death Rode the six hundred.

Cannon to right of them,

Cannon to left of them,

Cannon in front of them

Volley’d and thunder’d;

Storm’d at with shot and shell,

Boldly they rode and well,

Into the jaws of Death,

Into the mouth of Hell

Rode the six hundred.

Flash’d all their sabres bare,

Flash’d as they turn’d in air

Sabring the gunners there,

Charging an army while

All the world wonder’d:

Plunged in the battery-smoke

Right thro’ the line they broke;

Cossack and Russian

Reel’d from the sabre-stroke

Shatter’d and sunder’d.

Then they rode back, but not

Not the six hundred.

Cannon to right of them,

Cannon to left of them,

Cannon behind them

Volley’d and thunder’d;

Storm’d at with shot and shell,

While horse and hero fell,

They that had fought so well

Came thro’ the jaws of Death,

Back from the mouth of Hell,

All that was left of them,

Left of six hundred.

When can their glory fade?

O the wild charge they made!

All the world wondered.

Honour the charge they made,

Honour the Light Brigade,

Noble six hundred!

Summary of the poem

The poem is written; in the context of the heroic feat and sacrifice of a light brigade of six hundred soldiers charging against the – Russian-Turkish army in Crimean War. The poem describes the heroic spirit, undaunting spirit of the soldiers whose love for Britain and loyalty to its leadership is supreme for which they were ready sacrifice themselves and they did so. For, this brigade charged without knowing the extent of the enemy’s strength and without any reinforcement and support behind them. They dashed into the enemy’s range of cannon fire from left and right. There was no escape left for them and they did not retreat to save their lives to uphold the honor of their great country.

 

She Walks in Beauty 

 Lord Byron

 She walks in beauty, like the night

Of cloudless climes and starry skies;

And all that’s best of dark and bright

Meet in her aspect and her eyes:

Thus mellowed to that tender light

Which heaven to gaudy day denies.

One shade the more, one ray the less,

Had half impaired the nameless grace

Which waves in every raven tress,

Or softly lightens o’er her face;

Where thoughts serenely sweet express,

How pure, how dear their dwelling-place.

And on that cheek, and o’er that brow,

So soft, so calm, yet eloquent,

The smiles that win, the tints that glow,

But tell of days in goodness spent,

A mind at peace with all below,

A heart whose love is innocent!

Theme: The theme of the poem is about the exceptional beauty of a woman. This beauty is both internal as well as external. The poet here expresses his feeling when he saw the striking beauty and grace of the extraordinary beautiful woman. The poet describes her as so innocent, pure and heavenly. She is also compared to the beauty of the night and cloudless starry skies. To the poet, she is a simple and perfect woman whose mind is at peace and full of love.
Summary of the poem

The theme of the poem is poet Byron’s concept of exquisite beauty-beauty in perfection without blemish. He is highlighting and trying to elaborate this concept of perfect beauty with his romantic imagery and comparisons drawn from nature. Beauty is Personified into a female human whose aura has been likened to cloudless climate and starry sky where the best of darkness and brightness give a combined effect of perfection. Her eyes are likened to tender light. Her face is likened to pureness itself with serene sweet expression. Smiles on that face are eloquent and ever winning while the inner self of this beauty is also calm, .peaceful with innocent love. This is Byron’s romantic construct of what beauty should be like.

 

“I Died for Beauty, but was Scarce” 

Emily Dickinson

I died for beauty, but was scarce
Adjusted in the tomb,
When one who died for truth was lain
In an adjoining room.

He questioned softly why I failed?
“For beauty,” I replied.
“And I for truth, -the two are one;
We brethren are,” he said.

And so, as kinsmen met a night,
We talked between the rooms,
Until the moss had reached our lips,
And covered up our names. 

Theme: Beauty, truth and failure are the key factors of the poem. Again the tune of the poem is that one should not waste one’s entire life to reach a goal that will only end in failure. It is also implied that the ultimate failure of a long sought-after goal is death.
Summary: In the poem the theme of beauty and truth has been deal with. The two have been shown as one. The two have been likened to two dead persons-one who died for beauty and the other for truth. The two are: thus inalienably connected inseparable at one in their graves even and are hence interlocked in eternal association.

 

Time, You Old Gipsy Man  

Ralph Hodgson

TIME, you old gipsy man,

Will you not stay,

Put up your caravan

Just for one day?

All things I’ll give you

Will you be my guest,

Bells for your jennet

Of silver the best,

Goldsmiths shall beat you

A great golden ring,

Peacocks shall bow to you,

Little boys sing,

Oh, and sweet girls will

Festoon you with may.

Time, you old gipsy,

Why hasten away?

Last week in Babylon,

Last night in Rome,

Morning, and in the crush

Under Paul’s dome;

Under Paul’s dial

You tighten your rein—

Only a moment,

And off once again;

Off to some city

Now blind in the womb,

Off to another

Ere that’s in the tomb.

Time, you old gipsy man,

Will you not stay,

Put up your caravan

Just for one day?

Summary: In this poem, ‘Time, You Old Gipsy Man’, the poet Ralph Hodgson told about time. He said that time never stays. It always runs and runs. For this, he names the time “Old gipsy man”. To stop the time, he offered the time things such as belts for its jennet of the best silver, a big golden ring etc. He told time that peacocks will bow, little boys will sing songs, sweet girls will festoon the time with may. He requested the time to put up its caravan just for one day, but the time never stays.  It passes and passes. Nobody can stop its ever-busy frigate even for a second. We know how precious thing is time for us. If we don’t use it properly, it will run away and never come back. So, we need to use the time properly.

 

Ode On Solitude

By Alexander Pope 

Happy the man whose wish and care

A few paternal acres bound,

Content to breathe his native air

In his own ground. 

Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread,

Whose flocks supply him with attire,

Whose trees in summer yield him shade,

In winter fire. 

Bless’d who can unconcern’dly find

Hours, days, and years slide soft away,

In health of body, peace of mind,

Quiet by day; 

Sound sleep by night: study and ease

Together mix’d; sweet recreation;

And innocence, which most does please,

With meditation. 

Thus let me live, unseen, unknown,

Thus unlamented let me die;

Steal from the world, and not a stone

Tell where I lie.

Theme: To be in a state of solitude means that one has withdrawn from the world and has taken up a life of seclusion. This could be for various reasons, as one may have been born this way, one may have lost care for the world’s troubles, or one may just want to have a quieter life. This poem talks about how a life of isolation is still a happy and quiet life, and to maintain this peace, one must not only remain out of the world, but also remain so secluded that others cannot pester with the world’s problems. This poem has an overall happy, content, and peaceful, yet a bit hopeful, mood. The happy mood is seen mostly in the first stanza. The content mood is seen in the first three stanzas. In the first, third, and fourth stanzas, one can see the peaceful mood, and the hopeful mood can be seen in the fifth stanza. This poem also has an air of self-sufficency or accomplishment about it.

 

 

 

I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud

By William Wordsworth

I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o’er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze,

Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the Milky Way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

Appreciation: Once the poet was walking alone and moving aimlessly. He compared himself to a cloud that floats over the valley and hills. Suddenly he saw a bunch of daffodils beside the lake and under the trees. They were fluttering and dancing in the air. And the daffodils were golden colored. They were shining like the stars and blinking in the vast sky. They also reached the margin of the river. The poet saw thousands of daffodils in a single sight. They were dancing livelily moving their heads. Thus the poet sunk into a world of imagination.

 

Under the greenwood tree”

William Shakespeare

(from As You Like It)

 

Under the greenwood tree

Who loves to lie with me,
And turn his merry note

Unto the sweet bird’s throat,

Come hither, come hither, come hither:

            Here shall he see

            No enemy

But winter and rough weather.

 

Who doth ambition shun

And loves to live i’ the sun,

Seeking the food he eats,

And pleased with what he gets,

Come hither, come hither, come hither:

            Here shall he see

            No enemy

But winter and rough weather.

Theme of Under the Greenwood Tree

If one wants to spend a peaceful and a life without tensions and problems, one should leave all the ambition and falsehood of this fake world behind and give up luxury for the contentment of heart and mind. One should spend his life in the asylum of tree where he will find peace, friendship and happiness. The voice of birds will make him feel relaxed. Forest (village) life is preferable then city or town life because the forest life is closely contacted to beauty of nature and one can get rid of the trivial enmities

 

Go and Catch a Falling Star

John Donne

Go and catch a falling star,

Get with child a mandrake root,

Tell me where all past years are,

Or who cleft the devil’s foot,

Teach me to hear mermaids singing,

Or to keep off envy’s stinging,

And find

What wind

Serves to advance an honest mind.

If thou be’st born to strange sights,

Things invisible to see,

Ride ten thousand days and nights,

Till age snow white hairs on thee,

Thou, when thou return’st, wilt tell me,

All strange wonders that befell thee,

And swear,

No where

Lives a woman true, and fair.

Appreciation: In the poem, the poet asks to do a few impossible things. It is really impossible to catch a falling star, impossible to get a child from a mandrake root. He also wants to know where the past goes away and who cleft the devil’s foot. These are really impossible to tell. Even it is impossible to make him hear the

mermaid’s song and keep him off from envy. There is no wind that can suddenly make a man honest. If any person gets born with the power to see the unseen and the impossible things, if he rides a long way until his hairs get gray and when he returns, the poet will request him to tell how many wonders he has seen. The poet strongly says that this man can never say that he has seen a true and fair woman anywhere in the world.

 

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Farewell, farewell! but this I tell

To thee, thou Wedding-Guest!

He prayeth well, who loveth well

Both man and bird and beast.

He prayeth best, who loveth best

All things both great and small;

For the dear God who loveth us,

He made and loveth all.

Appreciation: In this poem the poet strictly focuses on only thing and that is love. And this love is a divine love that comes from the God. He says that people who love man, birds and the animals are those who worship the best because through loving them, one can come close to the God. He also says that people who do

not create any discrimination between the small and the great, rich and the poor are the best people to the God. God is the creator of us and he has created love. So He loves him who loves his all the creations.

 

Leisure

William Henry Davies

What is this life if, full of care,

We have no time to stand and stare.

No time to stand beneath the boughs

And stare as long as sheep or cows.

No time to see, when woods we pass,

Where squirrels hide their nuts in grass.

No time to see, in broad daylight,

Streams full of stars, like skies at night.

No time to turn at Beauty’s glance,

And watch her feet, how they can dance.

No time to wait till her mouth can

Enrich that smile her eyes began.

A poor life this if, full of care,

We have no time to stand and stare.

Appreciation: The poet writes this poem with a gloomy mood thinking over the life. He asks himself about the life and He means it to us. He means that life is really worthless if we don’t have any to time to see our outside, to take a seat under the trees, to watch the herd of the sheep and cows. Life becomes tasteless if we

do not have time to see the roadside scenario, to enjoy a night full of stars, to see the beauty of someone and the feet that move in dancing. Life becomes dull if we do not have time to see the smile that starts in one’s eyes and ends in the lips. The poet concludes that if we really don’t have time to do the above things, then our lives are poor and incomplete.

 

To Daffodils

Robert Herrick

Fair Daffodils, we weep to see

You haste away so soon;

As yet the early-rising sun

Has not attain’d his noon.

Stay, stay,

Until the hasting day

Has run

But to the even-song;

And, having pray’d together, we

Will go with you along.

We have short time to stay, as you,

We have as short a spring;

As quick a growth to meet decay,

As you, or anything.

We die

As your hours do, and dry

Away,

Like to the summer’s rain;

Or as the pearls of morning’s dew,

Ne’er to be found again.

Appreciation: Our life is not constant, rather transitory. Today or tomorrow, we all will pass away. The poet reminds us the fact through his poem. He compares human life to the Daffodils. Daffodils bloom in the spring and wither away within a short period of time. Comparing to Daffodils he says that we have a short time to stay on this earth. We all are going to leave this earth very soon. He compares our life duration to the duration of the spring. It comes and goes so quickly. He also compares our life to the summer rain and the dews of the morning that once go never come back. Thus the poet reminds himself and us to get prepared to leave this earth.